Boston Bruins

NHL shouldn't overthink offsides challenges any longer; they should just get rid of them

NHL shouldn't overthink offsides challenges any longer; they should just get rid of them

When the hockey world grew tired of shootouts, the league took something of a half measure. Rather than eliminate the shootout, the league moved overtime from 4-on-4 to 3-on-3. It worked; games that were tied at the end of regulation were more likely to end in the five-minute OT period than before, thus reducing the frequency of shootouts. 

Now, the NHL is dealing with its latest cumbersome gameplay issue: the offsides challenge. A half-measure isn’t as desirable in this case. No more half measures, Walter. 

The offsides challenge was introduced with good intentions, but it’s simply too easy to abuse. And really, when the option is there with only a timeout at risk, why wouldn’t a coach roll the dice that maybe a guy was offsides entering the zone 29 seconds before the goal was scored? 

The option needs to be taken away. Rely on blueline cameras and automatically look at anything close on a goal that’s scored off the rush. It would take two seconds and would save the refs from another Matt Duchene incident while saving the viewer a lot of time. Let anything else go the way of the dry scrape. 

There’s the temptation to instead tweak -- maybe make offsides challengeable if the entry in question occurs within however many seconds -- but that would just mean more time would be wasted seeing if a play was even challengeable. 

It was proposed at the GM meetings in Chicago that if a coach loses an offsides challenge, his team will be assessed a two-minute penalty. That sounds great as a deterrent, but it won’t stop instances of the needless why-the-hell-not challenge. Late in games, coaches might be just as likely to take their chances in a tie game or a one-goal game. That goal allowed could likely be the deciding tally, so if they’re likely to lose anyway, some coaches might still go for the time-wasting Hail Mary. 

And of course, the loser there is the person hoping to catch their train out of North Station in time, or the person who might doze off during the stupid challenge, wake up four hours later on their couch and develop back issues over time. That was a friend, not me. 

Colin Campbell said at the GM meetings in Chicago ahead of the draft that the league is trying to "temper" the negative reaction the offside challenge has received from players and fans. 

There’s really only way to do that, and that’s to get rid of it.

See you in a year when we’re going through the same thing with goalie interference. 

Morning Skate: Kurz takes Sharks' coverage to The Athletic

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Morning Skate: Kurz takes Sharks' coverage to The Athletic

Here are the links from around the hockey world, and what I’m reading, while appreciating Jimmy Kimmel more with each passing day.

*Congrats to FOH (Friend of Haggs) Kevin Kurz on his move to The Athletic. Here he details why he’ll now be covering the Sharks for them.

*Joffrey Lupul has apologized for intimating that the Toronto Maple Leafs are “cheating” when it comes to player injuries.

*PHT writer Cam Tucker has Loui Eriksson looking to bounce back with the Vancouver Canucks after a tough first year there. He’ll probably be better than he was last season, but one thing I learned about Eriksson during his time in Boston is that you’re not going to see his best unless there’s a reason for him to be at his best. Sitting in Vancouver in the middle of a comfortable, big money contract on a mediocre-to-bad hockey team isn’t exactly going to ratchet up the urgency.

*Tampa Bay defenseman prospect Mikhail Sergachev has “NHL written all over him” after a strong start to training camp with the Lightning. That’s music to management’s ears down there after they gave up Jonathan Drouin for him in the offseason.

*Nick Cotsonika chronicles the “big first step” that the NHL has made into China with an exhibition game there between the Kings and Canucks.

*This blog post pokes fun at Don LaGreca for a rant about geometry, but I agree with his overall point that the vast majority of people choose to like sports exactly because it doesn’t include these complex mathematical formulas that the fancy stats brigade is trying to introduce into the sports world with more and more force.

 

Bruins' Krug suffers fractured jaw, out at least three weeks

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Bruins' Krug suffers fractured jaw, out at least three weeks

BRIGHTON -- Now that the preseason games have started, it was inevitable that the injuries were going to start popping up for the Bruins.

Torey Krug will be out at least three weeks after suffering a non-displaced fracture in his jaw after taking a puck to the mouth in the second period of Tuesday night’s win over the Red Wings. And both Matt Beleskey (foot contusion) and Jakob Forsbacka Karlsson (upper body) are considered day-to-day with injuries.

Forsbacka Karlsson tumbled head-first into the end boards in the second period Tuesday. Beleskey suffered his injury in Monday night’s win over the Canadiens in Quebec City.

The Krug injury is significant, of course, and likely to cause him to miss at least the first few games of the regular season. It’s a tough break for the puck-moving defenseman, who missed all of last year’s playoffs because of a knee injury after staying healthy for the first 81 games.

It will give the Bruins a chance to give much closer looks to younger, left-shot defensemen like Matt Grzelcyk, Robbie O’Gara, Jeremy Lauzon and Jakub Zboril. All three were ticketed to start the year in Providence.

Here is the expected lineup for tonight’s game against the Philadelphia Flyers at TD Garden, with Anders Bjork getting his first official look while skating right wing on a line with Brad Marchand and Patrice Bergeron:
 
Marchand-Bergeron-Bjork
Gabrielle-Nash-Acciari
Blidh-Cave-Senyshyn
Agostino-Spooner-Heinen
 
Chara-Carlo
Grzelcyk-Cross
Lauzon-Postma