Canadiens say Bruins don't play dirty

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Canadiens say Bruins don't play dirty

The Vancouver Sun used an image of Brad Marchand as a rat in today's paper that can now be found on their website. It's clear how that part of North America feels about Marchand and the Bruins. But is that the sentiment in other cities?

Sure, the Bruins are tough and unmerciful when it comes to doling out physical punishment on the ice. But how does one determine then if the Bruins have stepped over the line between "physical" and "dirty" territory?

How about asking the Bruins sworn hockey enemies since the dawn of NHL history?

With the Montreal Canadiens in town, CSNNE.com asked a group of Habs players whether they felt that the Bruins were considered an honest and clean team, or if the accusations of dirty play were in fact accurate.

(Warning: The answers may shock and surprise you. Readers may actually find themselves growing to like Canadiens players.)

Canadiens defenseman and vocal leader Josh Gorges looked shocked when asked if he considered the Bruins a dirty team.

I dont think the Bruins are a team where you saw coming in 'Ive got to have my head up here because theyre going to do something dirty,' " said Gorges. Its a physical team. They play hard. They hit. Do they cross a line? I dont know. I think they play physical. Hockey is a physical game. Do they get suspensions? Of course they have, but you could say the same thing about 29 other teams in the league.

Take Marchand's speed bag" incident from last years Finals, when he repeatedly punched Vancouver's Daniel Sedin. Marchand was given penalties for the string of undefended punches to the Canucks superstar, but that isnt something Gorges finds dirty in his book of hockey.

If you get a punch in the face after a whistle I dont think thats being dirty. Thats part of hockey. Hes going to get a penalty and maybe you throw one back and get a penalty too. I dont think thats dirty hockey. I think its part of the aggression of playing hockey and thats what makes our sport great -- the physicality part of it. I love that part of the game.

Surely Bruins Public Enemy No. 1 P.K. Subban would be licking at his chops to throw both Marchand and the rest of the Bruins under the bus after the run-ins theyve had over the last two years.

Right . . . right?

The Habs defenseman said he respects the Bs for the way they play the game despite their frequent skirmishes during the season and postseason.

You dont ever want to see players get suspended. Marchand is a great player and a big part of their team, said Subban. We need to focus on whoever is in the lineup. Whether its Marchand or Benoit Pouliot on that first line we just need to be ready to play.

The Bruins are in your face. You know what I mean? Theyve had a lot of success over the years. Theyre Stanley Cup champions. Theyre playing some good hockey this year. Whatever theyre doing, theyre doing something right. Whenever you play them you know theyll get in your face, theyll finish their checks and theyre gonna work hard. For our team coming into this building its going to be the work ethic thats going to let us have success here, and nothing else.

Habs defenseman Hal Gill is in a unique position, having played for both Montreal and Boston. The veteran blueliner said the Bruins merely plays the kind of game they've played for 40 years without crossing the line that would be considered cheap or dirty.

Theyre a physical team and they like to intimidate and come in with force. Its not about who's tougher. Its about going to the dirty areas and getting the job done. The Bruins have always been a big and imposing team. Theyre big and theyre strong, said Gill. They toe that line. Thats part of their modus operandi.

Form their lips to Vancouver's ears. The Habs opinions prior to their Thursday clash with the Bruins speak volumes.

Don Sweeney: Bruins 'lost a good player' in Colin Miller

Don Sweeney: Bruins 'lost a good player' in Colin Miller

CHICAGO – Don Sweeney said the Bruins knew and expected they were going to lose one of three players in the NHL expansion draft, and it’s pretty clear it was going to be Adam McQuaid, Kevan Miller or Colin Miller leaving the team. The B’s took Kevan Miller out of the equation by leaving him on the protection list after a strong season while also playing some of his best hockey in the playoffs.

That left McQuaid and Miller with each of the two D-men standing an equal chance of getting selected by the Vegas Golden Knights, and the 24-year-old puck-moving Miller going to Vegas for the time being. It remains to be seen if Miller sticks with the Golden Knights, or if there is an eventual plan to flip him elsewhere like perhaps an interested party in Toronto.

Sweeney said the Bruins didn’t want to lose a player with potential like Miller, but it’s also true that he would have been stuck behind younger, better D-men on the depth chart with Charlie McAvoy and Brandon Carlo as better right-handed options.

“It was an interesting process to go through. It was hard at times because you felt like other teams were able to find deals to keep their team together while you felt vulnerable in that regard,” said Sweeney at the B’s team hotel in Chicago during a Thursday availability with the media. “You knew you were going to lose a good player. You knew they had targeted three players on our team that we felt they would target, and unfortunately we’re losing a good, young player.

“We thought highly of Colin. He was part of a big trade for us and we wish him well moving forward. We thank for him doing his part with the organization. We lost a good player.”

Clearly, the Bruins lost a defenseman with skills and youth on his side, but it’s also a young guy that hasn’t put it all together yet while never posting more than 16 points in each of his two seasons with the Black and Gold. Perhaps he will put together the offensive package at his next landing spot after showing flashes in Boston over the last two years, but that unknown factor while no longer being considered a prospect is the reason he didn’t find himself on the protected D list along with Zdeno Chara and Torey Krug.  

Bruins' 2017-18 schedule has three Habs games in eight days

Bruins' 2017-18 schedule has three Habs games in eight days


The Bruins released their schedule for the 2017-18 season Thursday, with their campaign beginning at TD Garden on Oct. 5 against the Predators. 

Two things stand out in Boston’s schedule. Eleven of their final 15 games are on the road, and they don’t play the Canadiens until mid-January.  

Then, when the B’s and Habs do finally meet, they play three times in an eight-day span. The rivals face each other Jan. 13 in Montreal, Jan. 17 in Boston and Jan. 20 in Montreal. The Bruins’ final regular-season meeting with the Habs is March 3. 

To see the full schedule, click here.