BruinsSenators: 5 from the First

BruinsSenators: 5 from the First

By Joe Haggerty
CSNNE.comOTTAWA Here are five thoughts from the first period with the Bruins and Senators locked in a scoreless tie at Scotiabank Place after the first 20 minutes of ho-hum action.1)Bruins looking awfully tired at the tail end of a nine-day trip through three different time zones thats seen them go 5-0-0 to this point. While its fortunate theyre playing an Ottawa Senators featuring such hockey household names as Colin Greening, Zack Smith, Erik Condra and Francis Lessard, the Bs will need something of substance to break through the Craig Anderson brick wall.2)Three shots on net for Jason Spezza, who is playing with some jump, fore-checking and genuinely appearing like he actually wants to win a hockey game. The Bs could be in trouble if Anderson continues to stand on his head, Spezza continues to be inspired for two more periods and the Bs cant knock the fatigue in their legs.3)Near miss from the Brad Marchand, Patrice Bergeron and Mark Recchi trio at the end of the first when Marchand found Recchi trailing the play, and he dropped it back to a wide open Bergeron. The Bs center never cleanly handled the puck, and would have had a goal if he couldve snapped a shot off. This is looking one of those nights when that line might have to grit, grease and grime a goal or two through the crease.4)Two blocked shots and a hit for Steve Kampfer, who looks pretty invested in both ends of the ice and seems to have knocked the rust of his game that was pretty evident in Edmonton.5)Ten saves for Tuukka Rask in the first as the Bs were outshot by a 10-6 margin. His best was a stuff job on Sergei Gonchar jumping into the play after Spezza had fired a puck toward the net. In both sets of games at the beginning and end of the trip, Rask has been better on the second night of consecutive starts.

Don Sweeney: Bruins 'lost a good player' in Colin Miller

Don Sweeney: Bruins 'lost a good player' in Colin Miller

CHICAGO – Don Sweeney said the Bruins knew and expected they were going to lose one of three players in the NHL expansion draft, and it’s pretty clear it was going to be Adam McQuaid, Kevan Miller or Colin Miller leaving the team. The B’s took Kevan Miller out of the equation by leaving him on the protection list after a strong season while also playing some of his best hockey in the playoffs.

That left McQuaid and Miller with each of the two D-men standing an equal chance of getting selected by the Vegas Golden Knights, and the 24-year-old puck-moving Miller going to Vegas for the time being. It remains to be seen if Miller sticks with the Golden Knights, or if there is an eventual plan to flip him elsewhere like perhaps an interested party in Toronto.

Sweeney said the Bruins didn’t want to lose a player with potential like Miller, but it’s also true that he would have been stuck behind younger, better D-men on the depth chart with Charlie McAvoy and Brandon Carlo as better right-handed options.

“It was an interesting process to go through. It was hard at times because you felt like other teams were able to find deals to keep their team together while you felt vulnerable in that regard,” said Sweeney at the B’s team hotel in Chicago during a Thursday availability with the media. “You knew you were going to lose a good player. You knew they had targeted three players on our team that we felt they would target, and unfortunately we’re losing a good, young player.

“We thought highly of Colin. He was part of a big trade for us and we wish him well moving forward. We thank for him doing his part with the organization. We lost a good player.”

Clearly, the Bruins lost a defenseman with skills and youth on his side, but it’s also a young guy that hasn’t put it all together yet while never posting more than 16 points in each of his two seasons with the Black and Gold. Perhaps he will put together the offensive package at his next landing spot after showing flashes in Boston over the last two years, but that unknown factor while no longer being considered a prospect is the reason he didn’t find himself on the protected D list along with Zdeno Chara and Torey Krug.  

Bruins' 2017-18 schedule has three Habs games in eight days

Bruins' 2017-18 schedule has three Habs games in eight days


The Bruins released their schedule for the 2017-18 season Thursday, with their campaign beginning at TD Garden on Oct. 5 against the Predators. 

Two things stand out in Boston’s schedule. Eleven of their final 15 games are on the road, and they don’t play the Canadiens until mid-January.  

Then, when the B’s and Habs do finally meet, they play three times in an eight-day span. The rivals face each other Jan. 13 in Montreal, Jan. 17 in Boston and Jan. 20 in Montreal. The Bruins’ final regular-season meeting with the Habs is March 3. 

To see the full schedule, click here.