BruinsAvalanche: 5 from the Second

BruinsAvalanche: 5 from the Second

By Joe Haggerty
CSNNE.comDENVER Here are five thoughts from the second period with the Bruins leading the Avalanche by a 4-1 score at Pepsi Center after 40 minutes of play in the Mile High City.1)Marc Savard took a hit to the head little more than three minutes into the second period when he and Matt Hunwick collided in the corner with Savard extended in an awkward position. Hunwick finished a clean check and Savard was rolling around on the ice in pain after the side of his head smacked into the dasher by the boards. Television replays apparently showed thatSavard might have beencrying with a towel up to his face as he skated off the ice to the dressing room, and he didnt return to the game. Not good. 2)Three points for Mark Recchi after his second period goal when Brad Marchand breaks out with the 42-year-old and feeds Recchi for a wide open score to give the Bs an insurance goal. The line of RecchiMarchandBergeron are rolling today, and look like theyll be together for a long, long time. Nine shots on net for the trio.3)With his first goal of the night, Recchi became the eighth Bruins skater to crack double-digits in goals scored this season with his 10th strike of the season. A little different from last season, eh?4)Zdeno Chara and Patrice Bergeron both putting up a plus-3 after the first two periods. Some excellent hockey being played out there by each of them.5)The Avs are a good young team, but theyve got some real issues with their defensemen. They need to step it up a notch or two as a unit unless Craig Anderson is expected to do his best Tim Thomas impersonation behind a leaky Colorado defense.6)Two goals for Milan Lucic, who has responded in the best way possible from a very off game against Buffalo the last time out. Its looking like Lucic is getting his game back.

Bruins don't extend qualifying offer to Joe Morrow

Bruins don't extend qualifying offer to Joe Morrow

With free agency just around the corner, the Bruins have officially cut ties with former first-round pick and last bastion of the Tyler Seguin trade, Joe Morrow.

The 24-year-old Edmonton native arrived in Boston along with Loui Eriksson, Reilly Smith and Matt Fraser in exchange for Seguin when he was shipped to Dallas, and now all of those players have moved on from Boston as well. Boston does still carry Jimmy Hayes on their roster, a player traded from Florida in exchange for Smith, as a last remnant of the Seguin deal, but it isn't expected to be too long before Hayes moves on from Boston as well.  

The B’s announced on Monday afternoon that they hadn’t extended a qualifying offer to Morrow, as well as P-Bruins power forward Colton Hargrove, as a restricted free agent, and that both B’s youngsters were now free to sign with any of the 30 NHL teams as free agents.

The Bruins extended qualifying offers to restricted free agents in Noel Acciari, Linus Arnesson, Austin Czarnik, Zane McIntyre, David Pastrnak, Tim Schaller, Ryan Spooner and Malcolm Subban, and will retain the associated team rights with all of those players. Negotiations are ongoing between the Bruins and Pastrnak continue over a long term deal that would put him in the same $6 million plus per season level as teammate Brad Marchand, but one source with knowledge of the negotiations indicated it’s “not close” to being a done deal.

Some RFA’s like Spooner and Subban might not necessarily fit into the long term plan for the Black and Gold, but they need to maintain their rights if they hope to trade them as valued assets down the line.

Morrow never put together the talent that made him a former first-round pick while he was in Boston, and totaled just one assist in 17 games for the B’s before playing well in five playoff games after getting pushed into duty due to injuries. In all Morrow finished with two goals and nine points along with a minus-8 rating in 65 games over three seasons in Boston, but could never string together an extended run of consistent play at the NHL level.

With the Bruins in the market to bring on another left-shot defenseman into the Boston fold this summer, it was pretty clear that the time had come to move on from Morrow while allowing him to potentially develop as an NHL D-man elsewhere.