Bruins working power-less play at practice

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Bruins working power-less play at practice

By JoeHaggerty
CSNNE.com
WILMINGTON, Mass. The Bruins finished 20th in the NHL in power play percentage with a 16.2 percent success rate through the season, and languished without their Marc Savard-playmaking presence healthy and producing in the middle of the man advantage.Savard isnt walking through that door and may not walk through that door ever again, but that didnt stop the Bruins from getting to work on the power play during Wednesdays practice.Everybody was present, accounted for and healthy, but the PP got special attention by Claude Julien, Geoff Ward and Doug Houda at the end of practice.The special teams need plenty of work and strengthening, and that started at Ristuccia Arena with Milan Lucic, Nathan Horton and David Krejci camped down low with Zdeno Chara and Tomas Kaberle on the point.The second working Bs unit had Mark Recchi, Rich Peverley and Brad Marchand with Patrice Bergeron and Dennis Seidenberg on the points, and all of them are trying to work up some magic.Its an area that Tyler Seguin could potentially help out with, but the Bruins will start off against the Habs with the 19-year-old as a healthy scratch unlikely to play in the first couple of games. Instead, the power play hopes will center on Kaberle and the calming influence he brings to the blue line a plan that hasnt exactly worked since the former Toronto Maple Leafs star arrived in Boston.The Bruins were 7-for-67 in 24 games with Kaberle after his trade from Toronto, and have managed only a 10 percent success rate on the man advantage after it was expected hed be the answer man in Boston. If it turns into a special teams festival then the Bruins might be in trouble against the Canadiens, but theyve got to find a way to do some man advantage damage when given the chances.We all realize how important these things are. Were playing a team thats very good on the power play, said Julien. Theyve had success. Weve got to stay out of the box as best we can, and when we are going to end up in the penalty box our penalty kill has to be good for us.As you know specials teams play a big role in the playoffs, and we expect special teams to come up big for us.
Joe Haggerty can be reached at jhaggerty@comcastsportsnet.com.Follow Joe on Twitter at http:twitter.comHackswithHaggs

Haggerty's NHL Power Rankings: So long, Wings' streak

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Haggerty's NHL Power Rankings: So long, Wings' streak

The Washington Capitals remain on top, but it's time to recognize the Red Wings' 25-year playoff streak that will come to an end this spring.

Saturday, Feb. 25: Shea Theodore waits for his time with Ducks

Saturday, Feb. 25: Shea Theodore waits for his time with Ducks

Here are all the links from around the hockey world, and what I’m reading, while giving two thumbs up to The Lego Batman Movie after a screening with my 3 1/2 year old.

*Alex Prewitt has a profile on Anaheim defenseman prospect Shea Theodore as he waits for his time with the Ducks.

*The Vancouver Canucks have a mumps problem this season, and we continue to wonder why this is becoming an issue again in a first-world society.

*PHT writer and FOH (Friend of Haggs) Jason Brough has Patrick Eaves dealt to the Ducks for what could be first round pick if Anaheim advances far enough through the playoffs.

*Flyers GM Ron Hextall says that Philly’s young team won’t be buying ahead of next week’s NHL trade deadline.

*Along with his “Sutter-isms”, diversity is a family value for the Los Angeles Kings head coach Darryl Sutter.

*Dave Strader gets back into the broadcast booth with the Dallas Stars, and will be a welcomed addition to the national NBC broadcast of Bruins/Stars on Sunday afternoon.

*As cold as he was earlier in the season, New York Rangers goalie Henrik Lundqvist is heating up now for the Blueshirts.

*For something completely different: Brie Larson is already prepping for her role as Captain Marvel by stepping up her game as an influence for positive change among her Hollywood peers.