Bruins win another in the third period

617774.jpg

Bruins win another in the third period

Once again the Bruins separated from their opponent in the final 20 minutes of regulation in Bostons 3-2 victory over the Montreal Canadiens at TD Garden. It's become something of a calling card.

The Bruins have outscored other NHL teams by a 48-22 margin in the third periods of NHL games this season and that isnt just an accident.

Its also because the Bruins dont hold the third period up as an be-all end-all for winning or losing games either. They just simply look at it as an opportunity to continue attacking with the same consistent flow from the beginning to the ends of games. It's an approach that is the residue of winning a championship.

It also helps if youve done some researching into King Arthurs Court, as Tim Thomas seems to have done.

Its probably because were trying to play every period the same and were not putting an over-emphasis on any period, said Tim Thomas, who made 16 saves in a final 20 minutes that saw him in full brick wall mode. We have confidence that we have stronger as the game goes on.

Stronger 'til dawn like Sir Lancelot. I dont know if you guys know what that means. Back in medieval times the duels would go all night because they had the heavy armor and they could hardly move, and the legend is that Lancelot would just keep getting strong the longer they went on. So thats what I mean by that.

Much of it is predicated on the depth of their lines and their overall physical style that wears down opponents, but theres also the simple mechanics of a team that knows the best time to break their opponents.

When we play our game we just try to be consistent and I think the consistency eventually pays off. Its usually in the third period, said Andrew Ference. Good things happen if we get a good fore-check going and we get some extended shifts in their zone. It tires teams out, and I think that there are mistakes that are made when youre tired.

When were playing really good hockey, I think that helps us out. I think teams just, especially their defensemen . . . when our forwards do a good job and our fore-check can be really effective, guys get worn out.

Wave after wave of attackers come for the Bruins as Claude Julien rolls four lines. Brad Marchand and Patrice Bergeron finally busted through with Marchands dangling one-on-one move following an elite Tyler Seguins saucer pass. That play was made possible by a softened Montreal defensemen corps that had made some mistakes through the game like P.K. Subbans soft play that turned into a goal off David Krejcis skate in the second period but was really ripe for the kill in the final 20 minutes.

Travis Moen gave away the puck to Bergeron by the Habs blue line, and Marchands score arrived just seconds later.

Theres a reason the Bs are a gaudy 17-0-0 when taking a lead into the third period: Killer instinct and good goaltending.

The team often talks about playing a full 60 minutes, but maybe they should just simply embrace the slogan stronger 'til dawn because thats exactly what they are.

Don Sweeney: Bruins 'lost a good player' in Colin Miller

Don Sweeney: Bruins 'lost a good player' in Colin Miller

CHICAGO – Don Sweeney said the Bruins knew and expected they were going to lose one of three players in the NHL expansion draft, and it’s pretty clear it was going to be Adam McQuaid, Kevan Miller or Colin Miller leaving the team. The B’s took Kevan Miller out of the equation by leaving him on the protection list after a strong season while also playing some of his best hockey in the playoffs.

That left McQuaid and Miller with each of the two D-men standing an equal chance of getting selected by the Vegas Golden Knights, and the 24-year-old puck-moving Miller going to Vegas for the time being. It remains to be seen if Miller sticks with the Golden Knights, or if there is an eventual plan to flip him elsewhere like perhaps an interested party in Toronto.

Sweeney said the Bruins didn’t want to lose a player with potential like Miller, but it’s also true that he would have been stuck behind younger, better D-men on the depth chart with Charlie McAvoy and Brandon Carlo as better right-handed options.

“It was an interesting process to go through. It was hard at times because you felt like other teams were able to find deals to keep their team together while you felt vulnerable in that regard,” said Sweeney at the B’s team hotel in Chicago during a Thursday availability with the media. “You knew you were going to lose a good player. You knew they had targeted three players on our team that we felt they would target, and unfortunately we’re losing a good, young player.

“We thought highly of Colin. He was part of a big trade for us and we wish him well moving forward. We thank for him doing his part with the organization. We lost a good player.”

Clearly, the Bruins lost a defenseman with skills and youth on his side, but it’s also a young guy that hasn’t put it all together yet while never posting more than 16 points in each of his two seasons with the Black and Gold. Perhaps he will put together the offensive package at his next landing spot after showing flashes in Boston over the last two years, but that unknown factor while no longer being considered a prospect is the reason he didn’t find himself on the protected D list along with Zdeno Chara and Torey Krug.  

Bruins' 2017-18 schedule has three Habs games in eight days

Bruins' 2017-18 schedule has three Habs games in eight days


The Bruins released their schedule for the 2017-18 season Thursday, with their campaign beginning at TD Garden on Oct. 5 against the Predators. 

Two things stand out in Boston’s schedule. Eleven of their final 15 games are on the road, and they don’t play the Canadiens until mid-January.  

Then, when the B’s and Habs do finally meet, they play three times in an eight-day span. The rivals face each other Jan. 13 in Montreal, Jan. 17 in Boston and Jan. 20 in Montreal. The Bruins’ final regular-season meeting with the Habs is March 3. 

To see the full schedule, click here.