Bruins talk NHL lockout at golf tournament

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Bruins talk NHL lockout at golf tournament

They were golfing on Monday, and by the looks of things, the Bruins may have plenty of free time for more golf this fall.

Claude Julien, Cam Neely, and a number of Bruins players took part in the team's annual charity golf tournament on Monday, but golf wasn't exactly on the minds of everyone in the organization.

The NHL lockout deadline is Saturday, and without a new CBA in place, it looks more and more likely that it'll occur.

CSNNE's Jessica Moran was on the scene, where Bruins players like Shawn Thornton and Andrew Ference don't seem particularly happy with the process to date.

"We want to fix the problem but we're not just going to take a 20-percent cut or a 24-percent cut or whatever it is across the board and give it to rich teams to get richer," Thornton told reporters. "That's not the answer. It didn't work last time, we were told it would, and now we're looking for solutions and I think our proposal addresses those issues."

But are the players optimistic in a deal soon? Unfortunately, no.

"I don't know if optimistic is the right word, not the way things have been going so far," Ference said. "It's pretty tough to be optimistic. You know, I think that at the beginning of the summer there were a lot of great talks. Hopefully that can continue."

But the talks have slowed, and the two sides are still far apart. The NHL has been through a lockout in the recent past, with many players bolting overseas. That will certainly be the case again.

"It would be the Czech Republic for sure," David Krejci said when asked where he would play if there was a lockout. "That's where I live, that's where I'm from, so that's my home. It would be Czech, but I'm here, I really hope it's going to start. It was a long summer.

"I want to play somewhere because I haven't played in a while," Bruins goaltender Tuukka Rask said. "If you don't play and you jump right in the NHL you have an eight-month layover and you could be a little rusty."

Rust could be an issue for the Bruins once the NHL season begins whenever that is. But rest and health certainly shouldn't be. Unless any players get injured while playing overseas, the B's should be plenty healthy for the upcoming season.

"Never felt so healthy, so it's good," Thornton said. "All the injuries have healed up. I think that's probably true across the board. I've seen the guys I've been skating with and everybody looks ready to go."

Coach Julien expects each and every player to show up in shape when the time comes.

"I don't think there's a single lazy player on our hockey club that would stop training or stop getting themselves ready for a season," he said, "because I think everybody is anticipating that there is going to be a season and that's the way it should be."

But that anticipation diminishes by the day.

Don Sweeney: Bruins 'lost a good player' in Colin Miller

Don Sweeney: Bruins 'lost a good player' in Colin Miller

CHICAGO – Don Sweeney said the Bruins knew and expected they were going to lose one of three players in the NHL expansion draft, and it’s pretty clear it was going to be Adam McQuaid, Kevan Miller or Colin Miller leaving the team. The B’s took Kevan Miller out of the equation by leaving him on the protection list after a strong season while also playing some of his best hockey in the playoffs.

That left McQuaid and Miller with each of the two D-men standing an equal chance of getting selected by the Vegas Golden Knights, and the 24-year-old puck-moving Miller going to Vegas for the time being. It remains to be seen if Miller sticks with the Golden Knights, or if there is an eventual plan to flip him elsewhere like perhaps an interested party in Toronto.

Sweeney said the Bruins didn’t want to lose a player with potential like Miller, but it’s also true that he would have been stuck behind younger, better D-men on the depth chart with Charlie McAvoy and Brandon Carlo as better right-handed options.

“It was an interesting process to go through. It was hard at times because you felt like other teams were able to find deals to keep their team together while you felt vulnerable in that regard,” said Sweeney at the B’s team hotel in Chicago during a Thursday availability with the media. “You knew you were going to lose a good player. You knew they had targeted three players on our team that we felt they would target, and unfortunately we’re losing a good, young player.

“We thought highly of Colin. He was part of a big trade for us and we wish him well moving forward. We thank for him doing his part with the organization. We lost a good player.”

Clearly, the Bruins lost a defenseman with skills and youth on his side, but it’s also a young guy that hasn’t put it all together yet while never posting more than 16 points in each of his two seasons with the Black and Gold. Perhaps he will put together the offensive package at his next landing spot after showing flashes in Boston over the last two years, but that unknown factor while no longer being considered a prospect is the reason he didn’t find himself on the protected D list along with Zdeno Chara and Torey Krug.  

Bruins' 2017-18 schedule has three Habs games in eight days

Bruins' 2017-18 schedule has three Habs games in eight days


The Bruins released their schedule for the 2017-18 season Thursday, with their campaign beginning at TD Garden on Oct. 5 against the Predators. 

Two things stand out in Boston’s schedule. Eleven of their final 15 games are on the road, and they don’t play the Canadiens until mid-January.  

Then, when the B’s and Habs do finally meet, they play three times in an eight-day span. The rivals face each other Jan. 13 in Montreal, Jan. 17 in Boston and Jan. 20 in Montreal. The Bruins’ final regular-season meeting with the Habs is March 3. 

To see the full schedule, click here.