Bruins crush Canucks 8-1, lose Horton in Game 3

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Bruins crush Canucks 8-1, lose Horton in Game 3

By DannyPicard
CSNNE.com

BOSTON -- @font-face font-family: "Times New Roman";p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal margin: 0in 0in 0.0001pt; font-size: 12pt; font-family: "Times New Roman"; a:link, span.MsoHyperlink color: blue; text-decoration: underline; a:visited, span.MsoHyperlinkFollowed color: purple; text-decoration: underline; table.MsoNormalTable font-size: 10pt; font-family: "Times New Roman"; div.Section1 page: Section1; The Bruins got back into the Stanley Cup Finals Monday night, scoring four second-period goals and four third-period goals to defeat the Vancouver Canucks 8-1 in Game 3 at TDGarden.

Boston now trails the series, 2-1.

Tim Thomas, heavilycriticized for the way he played Vancouvers game-winning goal in Game 2, made 40 saves in backstopping the victory.

What will be heavily criticized on Tuesday will be AaronRomes first-period hit on Nathan Horton.

Horton was taken off the ice on a stretcher and was sent toMassachusetts General Hospital after the Canucks defenseman came off his feetand crushed Horton with a devastating hit at the Vancouver blue line just overfive minutes into the game.

Horton had received a pass at center ice and quickly dishedit off to his left. Moments later, Rome stepped up at the blue line and hitHorton while Horton was looking the other way.

The Bruins said after the first period that Horton hadmovement in all of his extremities.

Rome was ejected from the game.

Vancouver outshot Boston 12-7 in the first period butthe Bruins made their statement in the second, scoring four goals andtaking a 4-0 lead into the third period.

Andrew Ference got the scoring started 11 seconds yes, 11seconds into the second. It took the same amount of time in overtime of Game2 for Alex Burrows to score the game-winner.

Ference was responsible for the initial neutral-zoneturnover that led to that game-winner. He got his revenge by wristing aknuckle-puck from the left point and into the top-right corner for a 1-0Bruins lead.

Mark Recchi made it 2-0 with 20 seconds left on a powerplay, 4:22 into the second period. Recchi was set up in the corner, and threw apass out front that was intended for Rich Peverley. But before it even got tohim, Ryan Kesler reached out with his stick, and re-directed the puck throughRoberto Luongos legs and into the net.

Brad Marchand gave the Bs a 3-0 lead while Vancouver was ona power play, with 8:30 left in the period. The short-handed goal was a one-maneffort that started with a stick lift from Marchand in the neutral zone.

Marchand took the puck hard down the right wing, and beatKesler wide at the circle. He came across the slot all alone, stayed patient,and shot the puck top-shelf after Luongo went down.

David Krejci added the fourth goal by putting home a reboundoff a low Michael Ryder shot from the high slot, with 4:13 left in the period.

In a chippy third period that saw Shawn Thornton, MilanLucic, and Dennis Seidenberg ejected, Daniel Paille gave the Bruins a 5-0 leadwhile scoring Bostons second short-handed goal of the night, skating down theleft wing and putting a shot on Luongo that hit the goaltenders glove andtrickled in.

Jannik Hansen gave Vancouver its only goal of the night,with 6:07 left in the game, putting home a one-timer from the left post.

Recchi, Chris Kelly, and Michael Ryder scored three moreagainst a clearly deflated Canucks team in the final 2:21 to make the final 8-1.

Danny Picard is on twitter at http:twitter.comDannyPicard

Don Sweeney: Bruins 'lost a good player' in Colin Miller

Don Sweeney: Bruins 'lost a good player' in Colin Miller

CHICAGO – Don Sweeney said the Bruins knew and expected they were going to lose one of three players in the NHL expansion draft, and it’s pretty clear it was going to be Adam McQuaid, Kevan Miller or Colin Miller leaving the team. The B’s took Kevan Miller out of the equation by leaving him on the protection list after a strong season while also playing some of his best hockey in the playoffs.

That left McQuaid and Miller with each of the two D-men standing an equal chance of getting selected by the Vegas Golden Knights, and the 24-year-old puck-moving Miller going to Vegas for the time being. It remains to be seen if Miller sticks with the Golden Knights, or if there is an eventual plan to flip him elsewhere like perhaps an interested party in Toronto.

Sweeney said the Bruins didn’t want to lose a player with potential like Miller, but it’s also true that he would have been stuck behind younger, better D-men on the depth chart with Charlie McAvoy and Brandon Carlo as better right-handed options.

“It was an interesting process to go through. It was hard at times because you felt like other teams were able to find deals to keep their team together while you felt vulnerable in that regard,” said Sweeney at the B’s team hotel in Chicago during a Thursday availability with the media. “You knew you were going to lose a good player. You knew they had targeted three players on our team that we felt they would target, and unfortunately we’re losing a good, young player.

“We thought highly of Colin. He was part of a big trade for us and we wish him well moving forward. We thank for him doing his part with the organization. We lost a good player.”

Clearly, the Bruins lost a defenseman with skills and youth on his side, but it’s also a young guy that hasn’t put it all together yet while never posting more than 16 points in each of his two seasons with the Black and Gold. Perhaps he will put together the offensive package at his next landing spot after showing flashes in Boston over the last two years, but that unknown factor while no longer being considered a prospect is the reason he didn’t find himself on the protected D list along with Zdeno Chara and Torey Krug.  

Bruins' 2017-18 schedule has three Habs games in eight days

Bruins' 2017-18 schedule has three Habs games in eight days


The Bruins released their schedule for the 2017-18 season Thursday, with their campaign beginning at TD Garden on Oct. 5 against the Predators. 

Two things stand out in Boston’s schedule. Eleven of their final 15 games are on the road, and they don’t play the Canadiens until mid-January.  

Then, when the B’s and Habs do finally meet, they play three times in an eight-day span. The rivals face each other Jan. 13 in Montreal, Jan. 17 in Boston and Jan. 20 in Montreal. The Bruins’ final regular-season meeting with the Habs is March 3. 

To see the full schedule, click here.