Bruins beat up on Stars in wild one, 6-3

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Bruins beat up on Stars in wild one, 6-3

By Danny Picard
CSNNE.com

BOSTON -- @font-face font-family: "Times New Roman";p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal margin: 0in 0in 0.0001pt; font-size: 12pt; font-family: "Times New Roman"; a:link, span.MsoHyperlink color: blue; text-decoration: underline; a:visited, span.MsoHyperlinkFollowed color: purple; text-decoration: underline; table.MsoNormalTable font-size: 10pt; font-family: "Times New Roman"; div.Section1 page: Section1; Three drops of the puck. Three fights. Four seconds.

Thursday night's game at the TD Garden began with the Bruins making a statement with their fists, and they followed it up by making a statement with their sticks. They scored four goals in the first period after engaging in three separate fights and then survived a third period let-down to beat the Stars, 6-3, Thursday night.
"We know theyre a physical team and we knew that before heading into the game. We wanted to obviously respond and show its our building --and we wanted to be physical," said PatriceBergeron, who finished with two goals and an assist in the win. "I mean it wasnt necessarily supposed to be fights, but it happened that way. Our guys did a great job responding and doing that, but Ialsothink the team had to respond for these guys that chipped in and fought with goals. I think we did that."

The Bruins' Gregory Campbell, Shawn Thornton, and Adam McQuaid dropped their gloves one after another in the game's opening seconds, marking one of the most memorable nights at the Garden in a long, long time.

Bergeron's two goals were both the result of going hard to the net and receiving perfect feeds from Brad Marchand. Milan Lucic and Shawn Thornton had two more to help the Bruins finish the first period with a 4-0 lead.

Dallas got a goal midway through the second period from Karlis Skrastins, and Brenden Morrow and Brad Richards added two more in the third, but it wasnt enough.

All of it began when Campbell lined up at the right wing on the games opening faceoff, and after some talk, dropped the mitts with Steve Ott the moment the puck was dropped.

Once that was finished, Thornton dropped the gloves with Krystofer Barch immediately following the next puck drop.

And just when you thought the chaos was over, McQuaid put a beatdown on Brian Sutherby, immediately following the third faceoff.

According to the Elias Sports Bureau, the last time there were six fighting majors within the first five seconds of a game was in 1996.

Lucic and Bergeron went on to each score in the first 1:20 of the game, forcing Stars coach Marc Crawford to pull goalie Andrew Raycroft after just two shots. One more fight ensued soon thereafter as Andrew Ference pummeled Adam Burish after Burish fired a shot at goalie Tuukka Rask after the whistle.

Bergeron then put the Bruins up 3-0 midway through the first period, and Thornton sniped the top-right corner to give the Bs a 4-0 lead with four minutes left in the period.

Boston held a 4-1 lead after two periods, but allowed two Dallas goals in the first three-and-a-half minutes of the third, which cut the Bruins lead to 4-3, forcing Claude Julien to call a time out.

Two minutes after the Stars made it a one-goal game, rookie Tyler Seguin put a spin-around shot through Kari Lehtonens five hole, giving the Bs a 5-3 lead.

Marchand made it 6-3 with 2:20 left in the game, putting home an empty netter out front, after Bergeron missed a hat-trick bid by hitting the right side of the empty net.

Danny Picard is on Twitter at http:twitter.comDannyPicard. You can listen to Danny on his streaming radio show I'm Just Sayin' Monday-Friday from 9-10 a.m. on CSNNE.com.

Morning Skate: Larry Robinson parts ways with Sharks

Morning Skate: Larry Robinson parts ways with Sharks


Here are all the links from around the hockey world, and what I’m reading, while refraining from shoving any world leaders today.

*Larry Robinson and the San Jose Sharks are parting after working together for five seasons, per FOH (Friend of Haggs) Kevin Kurz.

*Speaking of Kurz, he also has a Sharks mailbag on which players are most likely to be traded out of San Jose during the offseason. Somebody has got to go, and you’d think it would be somebody without much tread left on the tires.

*Moving on to other topics, Anaheim Ducks center Ryan Kesler said that losing a Game 6 in the Western Conference Finals to the Nashville Predators was the “toughest” loss of his career. I don’t see how this is possible. You see, Kesler is no slouch at falling short. In fact, he’s a tremendous loser, having dropped a Game 7 of the Stanley Cup Final at home in 2011 as a member of the Vancouver Canucks, and also having lost a Gold Medal Game for Team USA at the hands of Sidney Crosby and Canada in 2010 in overtime that was also played in Vancouver. It took a simple Google search to find an actual postgame video of Kesler crying into his hockey glove on the bench in the aftermath of Game 7 vs. the Bruins. So, pardon me if I’m not buying Kesler talking about a conference finals loss as the worst of his career when he was one home win away from being a Stanley Cup champion in Game 7, and proceeded to lose like he’s done many, many times in the most important games of his career. Dude, you’ve been through tougher losses. Trust me on that one.  

*The idea of trading Alex Ovechkin might be gaining some traction with the Capitals fan base, but it doesn’t seem to be based on reality at this point.

*The pride of Melrose, Mass, Conor Sheary, delivered in Game 7 for the Penguins as they return to the Stanley Cup Final in back-to-back seasons.

*Bobby Ryan said his strategy for success in the playoffs, at least in part, was staying off the phone. Maybe he ought to try that a bit more during the regular season.

*Congrats to the folks at NBC for another successful Red Nose Day that featured a reunion of the “Love Actually” cast among other things.