Video: Larry Bird hits a bunch of threes

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Video: Larry Bird hits a bunch of threes

Spend enough time searching YouTube for one specific "thing" and they'll eventually just do the searching for you.

Just like that. One day you'll visit the site, start to type "keyboard cats," "barefoot grannies," or whatever else into the engine, andBOOM. It's already on the home page: A list of recommended videos containing the VERY content you were about to search for.

Anyway, I know that this feature has been around forever, but I needed to explain how I came across a video called: "Larry Bird hits a bunch of threes."

And that's the explanation. It was just sitting on my YouTube homepage when I visited the site this morning. Did I click on it? Of course. It's called "Larry Bird hits a bunch of threes." That may be the most simple and genius title to any video in existence.

And after clicking, I wasn't disappointed. It was the most random and entertaining 3:50 of my day. So I figured I'd share.

The description under the video only states that the footage came from a 1991 regular season game between the Pacers and Celtics, but through a little research, I figured out that the night in question was March 4, 1991. In other (more depressing) words, just about 22 years ago.

The final score was Celtics 126, Pacers 101, and as the video suggests, Bird did hit a bunch of threes. He was 7-10 from deep on that night and finished with 29 points, 10 assists and seven rebounds.

As for the video . . .

It picks up in the middle of a random first-quarter possession, with 25-year-old Reggie Lewis being guarded on the perimeter by 25-year-old Reggie Miller. (Crazy to think that they were and still should be the same age. Reggie Miller isn't even that old.) Lewis drives to the lane, but loses the ball. It's picked up by Kevin Gamble and worked around to Bird who then drains a three in Chuck Person's eye.

And we're off.

Tommy Heinsohn is in the booth with someone who's most definitely not Mike Gorman. And Chuck Person is most definitely not the only guy about to be abused by Larry Bird.

Over the course of this 3:50 minute video, Detlef Schrempf also gets it a few times. LaSalle Thompson does too. There's one play where Dee Brown is running a pick-n-roll with Kevin McHale and kicks it out to Larry for a three right in Miller's mug. There's another play where Larry starts to shoot, pump fakes, loses Rik Smits and slings a pass to an open Robert Parish for an incredibly awkward lay-in. There are two occasions where Miller hits a three-pointer and you can see the blood start to boil in Bird's finger tips. In both cases, on the next possession, he gets the balls and immediately makes it rain from incredibly deep, striking Reggie's three from the record.

There are other highlights, including the play-by-play guy's building insanity with every Bird three. It goes from "There's Bird for three" to "Yikes!! Another one!" to my personal favorite "Oh my! Oh my!! Oh my!!!" Larry's got some great passes in there too, including dishes to Gamble and Lewis. At the 1:50 mark, there's even a shot of Bird dribbling the ball between his legs! Don't know if I've ever seen that before.

Towards the end the clip, Kevin McHale gets in on the three-point action with a third quarter buzzer beater, and then the video finishes up as randomly and awesomely as it began . . .

With Dee Brown going coast to coast and finishing with the most athletic play I've seen this season (from a player who's now 44 years old).

"I tell you what . . . PUT IT IN THE HIGHLIGHT FILM!!" Heinsohn screams.

Thankfully, someone listened. And thankfully, that someone's highlight film popped up on my YouTube homepage. (Thanks to fatal9ish for the content)

Enjoy . . .

I told you Dee's finish was great. He was a rookie here. Only 22 years old. Less than a month removed from winning the Dunk Contest. And why I am still typing? This post was supposed to end right after the video.

Rich can be reached at rlevine@comcastsportsnet.com. Follow Rich on Twitter at http:twitter.comrich_levine

Blakely: Thomas isn't a starter, but new All-Star voting is an improvement

Blakely: Thomas isn't a starter, but new All-Star voting is an improvement

BOSTON – There’s certainly some disappointment among Celtics Nation that Isaiah Thomas just missed out on being an All-Star starter in the East.

But one thing we can certainly see with the new voting system … it works way better than the old way of choosing starters.

This was the first year that the NBA decided to allow current NBA players as well as a select panel of media choose who the starting five in the Eastern and Western Conferences would be.

The fan vote would count for 50 percent while media and players would each represent 25 percent of the final tally.

From there, the players would receive a fan ranking, a media ranking and a player ranking.

Because of the aforementioned breakdown – fans count for 50 percent while media and players represent 25 percent of the vote – the fan ranking would be counted twice while the media and player rankings would be counted once.

Let’s look at Isaiah Thomas’ situation which ultimately came down to him and Toronto’s DeMar DeRozan for the final starting spot in the backcourt.

Thomas was fourth in the fan voting, second in the player voting and first among guards in the media voting. So when you add the fan voting (4 *2) + player voting (2 *1) + media voting (1*1), you get a total of 11 which is then divided by 4 to arrive at a score of 2.75.

Now let’s look at DeRozan.

He was third in the fan voting, third in the player ranking and second in the media voting among guards. So his score when you add the fan voting (3*2) + player voting (3*1) + media voting (2*1), you get a total of 11 which when divided by 4 brings you to a score of 2.75 – same as Thomas.

The tiebreaker was the fan vote which meant DeRozan and not Thomas, would get the starting nod in next month’s All-Star game.

As much as it may suck that Thomas lost out because of this system, he would not have had a shot at being a starter under the old system in which the fans were the ones to pick starters.

In fact, it would have been Chicago’s Dwyane Wade in the starting lineup under the old system.

No disrespect to D-Wade, but he has not had an All-Star worthy season. And had the old system been in place, he would be an all-star and thus take up a roster spot of another player who frankly, is more deserving.

And if you take a glance out West, they too would have had a starter who has not had an All-Star caliber season.

Golden State’s Zaza Pachulia finished second in the voting among Western Conference forwards, fueled in large part to his home country, Georgia, voting early and often for him. Because of the media and player voting, Pachulia wound up sixth among Western Conference big men which is still too high when you consider some of the players behind him – Memphis’ Marc Gasol, Minnesota’s Karl-Anthony Towns, San Antonio’s LaMarcus Aldridge and Los Angeles Clippers’ DeAndre Jordan – who are all having better seasons.

While no one would say this new system is perfect, considering how this year’s voting would have panned out under the old rules, this change by the league is a good one that should stick around.

NOTE: I was among the media panelists selected by the NBA to vote for this year’s All-Star starters. My selections in the East were Cleveland’s LeBron James, Kevin Love and Milwaukee’s Giannis Antetokounmpo in the frontcourt with Cleveland’s Kyrie Irving and Boston’s Isaiah Thomas in the backcourt. My Western Conference selections were Kevin Durant of Golden State, Anthony Davis of New Orleans and Kawhi Leonard of San Antonio in the frontcourt, with Houston’s James Harden and Oklahoma City’s Russell Westbrook in the backcourt.