Same old, same old from JHW

881219.jpg

Same old, same old from JHW

In the past, I've given John Henry a hard time about his obsession with only conducting interviews over e-mail. My belief was, and is, that whole thing just seemed a little too calculated and controlled. Like most things associated with this ownership group, there was just something so distant and disingenuous about him only existing in cyber space.

I know he got a lot of flack for barging into the 98.5 studios that afternoon, but I loved seeing that from Henry. I wish he'd carry himself like that more often. Like a real person. With real emotions. With passion that goes beyond what can be expressed with different fonts and punctuation.

But with all that being said, Henry finally did speak today down in Fort Myers. He spoke REALLY spoke to reporters for the first time since the end of last season . . .

And it was a total let down.

Here's Henry on:

Rumors that the Sox are for sale: "The last 12 years have been the best years of my life," he said. "You just don't get an opportunity to own the Boston Red Sox, so as long as we can do it, the three of us (chairman Tom Werner and CEO Larry Lucchino) are committed to being here. These thoughts that we're somehow selling, those are just erroneous."

Liverpool: "Last year's losses on the field weren't the result of Liverpool . . . I would say that all three of us are intimately involved every day with everything that goes on in Fenway Sports Group."

The perception that the Sox are too PR conscious: "I have to laugh. That's just laughable. It's ludicrous to say we signed any player, since we've been here, for PR purposes. I don't think anybody would assert that. And if it's asserted, it's just ludicrous."

And those are the highlights. In other words, there were no highlights. He said nothing that we haven't heard before. Nothing that sheds light on what we didn't already know. Nothing to help Sox fans feel better about the direction of the team, because who's to say if he's even telling the truth.

It probably doesn't matter. When you think about it, is there anything that Henry can say to make this situation better? Short of "It's with a heavy heart that I announce that the Red Sox have parted way with Larry Lucchino," I don't think so.

The situation is beyond words and promises.

It won't get better until the Sox make it better on the field.

Regardless of anything Henry says to reporters or fires off from keyboard.

Unless he, Larry and Tom feel like filming a line-for-line recreation this video.

That's sure to win back some support. At least from me.

Rich can be reached at rlevine@comcastsportsnet.com. Follow Rich on Twitter at http:twitter.comrich_levine

McAdam: Poor homestand puts Red Sox on tough road

McAdam: Poor homestand puts Red Sox on tough road

The Red Sox had their chance.

They could have beefed up during the just-completed homestand and taken advantage of the worst team in the American League (Minnesota) and another that was only three games over .500 when it came to town (Detroit).

Instead, the Red Sox were just 2-5 in the last seven games at Fenway, losing ground in the standings to the Orioles and Blue Jays rather than making the race tighter.

That's not to suggest the Red Sox played their way out of contention in the last week. There are better than two months remaining in the season and the schedule isn't yet two-thirds complete.

Moreover, there is no dominant team in the East, and, thus, no one capable of pulling away and leaving the rest of the teams in their wake.

Baltimore and Toronto are flawed, too, as the first 100 or so games of the season have demonstrated.

But what the disappointing homestand means is this: Because they didn't win as much as they should at Fenway in the last week, the Sox will have to make up for that on the road.

As has been talked about ad nauseum in the last week, the schedule is about to become more demanding for the Red Sox. It's bad enough that they're in the middle of a stretch that will see them enjoy one (1) day off in the span of 44 days. Making matters worse is that 41 of the final 63 games are away from home -- including the next 11.

Put another way: The Red Sox have not yet had a three-city road trip this season, but all four of their remaining trips are of the three-city variety, including two that include travel to the West Coast.

The Red Sox have played fairly well on the road (21-19) -- they're one of just four teams in the American League with a winning road record -- but the simple fact remains: It's harder to win on the road than it is at home. And that's before you take into consideration the toll that lengthy road trips can take.

Of the next three road opponents, one has a losing record, and another is just two games over .500. Only the Los Angeles Dodgers, next weekend's interleauge road opponent, are playoff contenders from among that group.

Then again, the Red Sox thought they could roll over the Twins last weekend and came away with a four-game split, so it's difficult to handicap these things.

It should help, too, that the Red Sox are getting healthier.

Junichi Tazawa returned this week, and Craig Kimbrel could be back as early as Monday in Seattle. Chris Young and Josh Rutledge could rejoin them before they head out on their next road swing in mid-August.

With all the talk of the daunting schedule and demanding travel ahead, Dustin Pedroia was having none of it.

"We can play just as well on the road as we have at home,'' said Pedroia. "That stuff (the schedule) is irrelevant.''

Maybe. But one way or another, we're about to find out.

Source: Sox seek smaller pieces, not big names, at trade deadline

Source: Sox seek smaller pieces, not big names, at trade deadline

BOSTON -- According to an N.L. talent evaluator who is familiar with some of the Red Sox ongoing talks with teams leading up to the non-waiver trade deadline, the Sox seem focused on adding a bullpen piece and/or back-end starters.

The need for the former is rather obvious, given the current injuries to Criag Kimbrel and Koji Uehara. The Sox can use some upgrades and another experienced arm to guide them through the final two months.

As for the rotation, it's not a surprise that the Sox aren't serious bidders for more glamorous names like Chris Sale, since that would require them to gut their farm system.

But the team's starter depth is perilous, with only Clay Buchholz in reserve. It makes perfect sense that the Sox would be seeking someone else to help provide them with insurance against further injuries or under-performance.

Will Red Sox' recent poor homestand come back to haunt them?

Will Red Sox' recent poor homestand come back to haunt them?

Lou Merloni joins Early Edition to discuss whether he thinks the Red Sox poor homestand against the Twins and Tigers will ultimately come back to haunt them.