Pedro comes home

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Pedro comes home

The Red Sox are experiencing a rare gust of positive publicity this afternoon, thanks to the announcement that Pedro Martinez has re-joined the organization as Special Assistant to the General Manager.

For more on what that actually means, here's Ben Cherington, via the team's official press release: "Pedro will be involved in several areas, including the evaluation, mentorship, and instruction of young players in Spring Training and throughout the season."

Translation: Pedro's going to do whatever the hell he wants. He'll come and go as he pleases. He'll be great to have around, but he won't always be around. Bottom line: I highly doubt you'll see him sitting in Johnny Pesky's old dugout seat 81 games a year.

And that's fine. After all, that's Pedro. He did whatever he wanted when he was pulling in eight figures as the ace of one of the most obsessed-over franchises in sports. There's no question that he'll approach this new position with that same unique Pedroality. Personally, I'm already looking forward to team picture day, when everyone's waiting around the Monster as Lucchino stands in the corner screaming into his cell phone: "Where the eff is Martinez?! God damn it, Ben. I told you this was a stupid."

It's going to be awesome. Just the idea of having Pedro around, even if it's only once in a while, is going to be awesome. If he takes the job seriously, you have to think that he can make an impact. Who doesn't respect Pedro Martinez? Who knows more about the art of pitching and the mentality a player needs to be successful (especially in Boston)? Even if he doesn't take it that seriously, it will just be fun to have Pedro back in the mix; a welcomed diversion from the mess the Three Stooges have made.

Either way, it's winwin.

But here are three ways it can get even better.

1. Pedro needs to join Twitter. He was born for Twitter.

2. Pedro must insist that the Sox hold a special pre-game ceremony to honor the life and legacy of Nelson de la Rosa who was conspicuously and flagrantly absent from last year's centennial celebration.

3. You've heard of teams growing playoff beards, but that's played out. On the other hand, playoff jehri curls are an untapped commodity, and just what this team needs to get back to the top. And if they don't make the playoffs? I don't care. Call them "last place jehri curls."

As long as there are jehri curls.

Rich can be reached at rlevine@comcastsportsnet.com. Follow Rich on Twitter at http:twitter.comrich_levine

Ortiz quells comeback speculation: 'My playing time has expired'

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Ortiz quells comeback speculation: 'My playing time has expired'

Forget that cryptic Tweet to the Globe. David Ortiz isn't walking through that door, fans. At least not as a player.

"My playing time has already expired," Ortiz told ESPN Deportes. "Baseball is not something that you wake up today and you say, 'I'll play tomorrow.' Baseball is something that carries a lot of sacrifice, a lot of preparation, and there is a reason why we train the entire year to play it, practice every day, especially during the season, because it is a sport of consistency."

No one really thought he was contemplating a comeback, but last week he Tweeted this . . .

. . . and that raised hopes that he'd changed his mind.

Not so.

 

Red Sox avoid arbitration with Bogaerts, Holt with 1-year deals

Red Sox avoid arbitration with Bogaerts, Holt with 1-year deals

Facing a 1 p.m. Friday deadline to avoid arbitration, the Red Sox reportedly agreed to a one-year, $3.6 million deal with center field Jackie Bradley Jr., and also avoided hearings with six other players.

Shortstop Xander Bogaerts, utilityman Brock Holt, pitchers Joe Kelly, Robbie Ross Jr., Tyler Thornburgh and catcher Sandy Leon also agreed to one-year deals.

Terms of the deals were not announced.

It leaves left-handers Fernando Abad and Drew Pomeranz as the only arbitration-eligible Red Sox without a deal.