Lucchino: The Red Sox Years

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Lucchino: The Red Sox Years

Tuesday was Truck Day at Fenway Park, but for a brief moment, Larry Lucchino stepped away from the hunky dory festivities to address a very serious issue

Francona: The Red Sox Years

"Ive got more compelling, true, non-fiction I want to read," Lucchino said, when asked for his take on the recently-released book from Francona and Dan Shaughnessy.

But as the Herald's Mike Silverman writes, even though Lucchino hasn't read the book, "he's heard enough, he says, to know that the authors he only cites Shaughnessy write misleadingly about how the team truly operates and is governed. And 'the notion that (Henry and Werner) are not passionate baseball fans and deeply committed to winning is just absurd and offensive.

SRO TAKE: OK, first of all, there's no way Lucchino hasn't read this book. At the very least, he's read all the parts that are about him, and I'd guess, everything about the owners in general. I don't say that because he's Larry Lucchino, but because he's a human being. Someone writes a highly-publicized book filled with "misleading" statements about the way you run your business, and you just ignore it? No one has that kind of will power. Not even the almighty Lucchino.

Second of all, Larry can deny and refute every single word of what Shaugnhessy wrote, but almost no one in Boston is going to give him the benefit of the doubt. It's not that Francona's incapable of stretching the truth, but compared to Lucchino, Tito's Abraham Lincoln. If only one of them is being honest, who do you believe?

Lastly, in this situation, there's only one way for Larry to really earn the trust and respect of Red Sox fans.

Read the book, or just admit that he's read the book. And then collaborate with me on a response Lucchino: The Red Sox Years.

We'll sit down for two months, and talk about everything that was reported in Shaughnessy's version. We'll talk about the truth. What really happened. Correct all the misleading aspects of what Francona and Theo Epstein had to say.

Of course, his words can't tell the whole story. I'll have to find a few other people not John Henry or Tom Werner to back up and complement his version. But seeing that his version is the truth, it shouldn't be that hard. And at the end of the day, won't it be an enormous weight off his shoulders? No more lying. No more spin. No more deceit. Just complete transparency and a real behind-the-scenes look at the negativity that's surrounded these Red Sox owners.

Finally, we'll know and understand the truth. And by next Truck Day, life in Red Sox Nation will be nothing but puppy dogs and ice cream.

And whatever lies are told in the meantime.
Rich can be reached at rlevine@comcastsportsnet.com. Follow Rich on Twitter at http:twitter.comrich_levine

Former Red Sox prospect Andy Marte killed in car crash in Dominican Republic

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Former Red Sox prospect Andy Marte killed in car crash in Dominican Republic

Former major leaguer Andy Marte, a one-time top prospect in the Red Sox organization, was killed in a car crash in the Dominican Republic on Sunday. He was 33.

Marte was killed the same day that Royals pitcher Yordano Ventura died in a separate car crash in the Dominican. Ventura was 25. Coincidentally, Ventura was the Royals starting pitcher in Marte's final major league game, for the Arizona Diamondbacks on Aug. 6, 2014.

Marte, drafted by the Braves in 2000, was ranked the No. 9 prospect in baseball in 2005 when the third baseman was traded to the Red Sox as part of the deal that sent shortstop Edgar Renteria to Atlanta and Marte became the top-ranked prospect in the Red Sox organization.  

Marte was traded by the Red Sox to the Indians in 2006 in the deal that sent Coco Crisp to Boston and spent five seasons with Cleveland. His best season was 2009 (.232, six home runs, 25 RBI in 47 games). After a six-game stint with Arizona in 2014, he played in South Korea the past two years.  

Metropolitan traffic authorities in the Dominican told the Associated Press that Marte died when a car he was driving his a house along the highway between San Francisco de Macoris and Pimentel, about 95 miles (150 kilometers) north of the capital.
 

Royals pitcher Yordano Ventura killed in car crash in Dominican Republic

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Royals pitcher Yordano Ventura killed in car crash in Dominican Republic

Kansas City Royals pitcher Yordano Ventura was killed in a car crash in in the Dominican Republic on Sunday morning, according to multiple reports. Ventura was 25 years old.

Highway patrol spokesman Jacobo Mateo told the Associated Press that Ventura died on a highway leading to the town of Juan Adrian, about 40 miles (70 kilometers) northwest of Santo Domingo. He says it's not clear if Ventura was driving.

Ventura was killed the same day former major leaguer Andy Marte died in a separate car crash in the Dominican. Coincidentally, Ventura was the starting pitcher in Marte's final MLB game, for the Arizona Diamondbacks on Aug. 6, 2014. 

Ventura was 13-8 with a 4.08 ERA for the Royals' 2015 World Series champions and 11-12 with a 4.45 ERA in 32 starts in 2016. The right-hander made his major league debut in 2013 and in 2014 went 14-10 with a 3.20 ERA for Kansas City's A.L. pennant winners. 

Ironically, Ventura paid tribute to his good friend and fellow Dominican, Oscar Tavares, who was also killed in a car crash in the D.R. in October 2014, by wearing Tavares' initials and R.I.P. on his cap before Ventura's start in Game 6 of the World Series in 2014. 

Ventura is the second current major league player to die in the past five months. Former Miami Marlins ace Jose Fernandez was killed in a boating accident in Miami on Sept. 25.