Age is just a number for Brady and Luck

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Age is just a number for Brady and Luck

As a guy whos spent the last three years dating a girl who's six years his junior, Id like to think that I know a thing or two about age discrepancy. And while Im sure there are probably more Norv Turner fans in San Diego right now than CSNNE readers who give the slightest crap about my personal life, for the sake of Tom Brady and Andrew Luck, take a second and hear me out. Itll be quick, and honestly, not even that personal.

This is by no means a groundbreaking statement, but one thing I can say for sure is that a relationship (as long as everyones legal) should never be defined by age. In many ways, nothing should, but in terms of a relationship . . . I mean, its just life. Everyone lives it differently. Some 30-year-olds act like theyre 20, some 30-year-olds act like theyre 50, some 30-year-olds bounce back and forth between the two, freaking themselves out every step along the way. Which group is right? Depending on whom you ask, theyre all right. Or theyre all wrong. Its a total mess. And sometimes that mess results in a connection between two people who are in similar stages at different ages. And sometimes it works. Age isnt always a big deal.

But with that being said and re-iterating the fact that my girlfriend is now a far beyond legal and professional human being Ill admit that theres nothing creepier or more jarring about our six-year difference than when we play a game of How old were you in . . .

For instance, in the spring of 1998, I was graduating high school and she was finishing up sixth grade. In 2002, I was graduating college and she was a high school sophomore. In 2012, Im expecting Chris Hansen to bust through my door with a camera crew. But only when I think about it in those terms.

And thankfully, thats not the reality.

OK, back to Tom Brady.

Heading into Sundays game against the Colts, there are a ton of interesting storylines surrounding New England, Indianapolis, and really, the entire NFL. We can talk about how the Pats defense needs to redeem itself after last weeks disaster. We can talk about Chuck Pagano and the feel good story of the year. We can talk about HOW SOMEONE ON THE JETS SAID THAT TIM TEBOW SUCKS AND PRETEND THAT ANYONE CARES!

But more than anything, I want to talk about Brady vs. Luck: Chapter 1.

Here in New England, we do our best not to think about Tom Bradys age. And for the most part, I dont think we need to. While theres no doubt that hes getting older, at this point, its clear that Tom Bradys 35 goes against the stereotype. For all the grumblings about his downfall, Bradys still averaging 293.9 yards a game and is on pace to eclipse 4700 passing yards for only the third time in his career. His 0.8 interception percentage matches his lowest ever. On that note, only five guys in the league have thrown more passes than Brady this season, but not one starting quarterback has thrown fewer interceptions. His 80.9 Total Quarterback Rating ranks second in the NFL, and is his best since ESPN started tracking the stat back in 2008.

Bottom line: With Brady, age isnt a big deal. Not yet at least.

But with that being said, and as much as its all true, Tom Bradys 35 is no match for a little game of How old were you in . . . with Andrew Luck.

For instance, when the Pats drafted Brady in the spring of 2000, Andrew Luck was in the fourth grade. When 24-year-old Brady arrived in the fall of 2001, Luck had just turned 12. In the spring of 2008, as Brady was in recovery from the most historic loss of his career (and no one had even heard of Bernard Pollard), Luck was giving the valedictorian speech at Stratford High School in Houston.

Think about that for a second: Tom Brady is 35. Andrew Luck is 23.

In a way, it leaves you with even more respect for how long Bradys been doing this. But on the other hand, it also reminds you of how long Bradys been doing this. Its like, OK, he might not be old, but my God, hes old! And Luck? He was born in 1989! In my head, he shouldnt even be old enough to have his drivers license, never mind lead a team into Gillette Stadium.

But obviously, the dynamic between Tom Brady and Andrew Luck cant be defined by a 12-year discrepancy.

First of all, because of everything I already said about Brady. And second, because the age of 23 has nothing on Andrew Luck. The kids a freak in every positive connotation of the word. He's barely human.

On the field, its already clicking. Since throwing three interceptions in Week 1 at Chicago (aka the most horrifying way for any quarterback to kick off his NFL career), Lucks thrown more than one interception in a game only once, and has only thrown two over the course of Indys four-game winning streak. For the season, his QBR (77.6) ranks fourth in the NFL, behind only Peyton Manning, Brady and Matt Ryan. Hes not as good as he will be, but Lucks already a legitimate quarterback. Hes not 23. And off the field, thats only magnified.

What Luck has been forced to deal with behind the scenes this year makes Week 1 at Soldier Field feel like a home game against the Stanford JV. Theres the pressure of being the No. 1 pick. The pressure of taking over for one of the best quarterbacks in NFL history. And . . . theres pressure and emotional chaos that comes with your coach being diagnosed with cancer three games into the season, and being forced to leave the team. Lucks handled it with ease. At least on the surface. His comfort and confidence with the media is almost bizarre. Its hard to believe that someone that age could be so polished, but at the same time so introspective and revealing. To be honest, it reminds me a lot of Tiger Woods, which is at least somewhat concerning. But for now, Luck is already as good as advertised.

Of course, hes not on Bradys level yet, and I think the final score on Sunday will prove that. But the game will also serve as the first chapter in what will likely become a historically significant NFL rivalry. A tailor made passing of the torch.

Brady says that he wants to play five more years, and theres no reason to believe that he cant. But if he wants to stick around, he better get used to dealing with Luck.

The two might be 12 years apart, but it wont be long before their lives and careers converge on the same path. And while you can sometimes make that work in a relationship, in football, it's a collision course.

For Brady and Luck, Sunday's just the beginning.

Rich can be reached at rlevine@comcastsportsnet.com. Follow Rich on Twitter at http:twitter.comrich_levine

Affleck offers passionate Brady defense when asked about Deflategate

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Affleck offers passionate Brady defense when asked about Deflategate

When the topic of Deflategate was broached on HBO's Any Given Wednesday with Bill Simmons, which debuted this week, Ben Affleck became all kinds of fired up.

"What they did was suspend Tom Brady for four days for not giving them his [expletive] cellphone," Affleck said. "I would never give an organization as leak-prone as the NFL my [expletive] cellphone . . . so you can just look through my emails and listen to my voicemails?"

Affleck grew up in Cambridge, Mass. and is a passionate Patriots fan. He made no attempts to hide his fandom, and his appreciation for Brady, as he and Simmons (also a Patriots fan) discussed the football-deflation controversy that has now lasted well over a year. 

Affleck, who said he would want to cast himself as Brady if ever a Deflategate movie was made, harped on the fact that the league wanted Brady to turn over his phone. 

"Maybe Tom Brady is so [expletive] classy and such a [expletive] gentleman," Affleck said, "that he doesn’t want people to know that he may have reflected on his real opinion on some of his co-workers."

Brady is waiting for the Second Circuit to make a decision as to whether or not it will rehear his case against the NFL. Earlier this offseason, the Second Circuit reinstated Brady's four-game suspension issued by the league when a three-judge panel ruled in favor of the NFL, 2-1. 

Pro Football Talk wrote on Thursday that a decision from the Second Circuit could come at any time. If the rehearding request is denied, Brady could then take the case to the Supreme Court. Should the Second Circuit grant Brady a rehearing, his suspension would be delaed until the court reached a decision. In that case, Brady could potentially play the entire 2016 season before a decision came to pass. 

Brady posts high school essay to Facebook on living in his sisters' shadow

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Brady posts high school essay to Facebook on living in his sisters' shadow

Tom Brady wasn't always the most famous person in his family. Growing up, his sisters were the accomplished athletes in the household. 

For his latest Throwback Thursday style Facebook post, Brady published a pair of photos of an old high school essay that he wrote in the fall of his senior year in 1994. It was titled "The way my sisters influenced me."

I found an essay I wrote in 1994... I love my big sisters! #tbt. Thanks for the good grade Mr Stark!

Posted by Tom Brady on Thursday, June 23, 2016

In it, he discusses some of the difficulties of growing up with three older sisters and no brothers. Because Maureen, Julie and Nancy Brady had achieved so much in softball, basketball and soccer, Brady -- or "Tommy," as he signed his paper -- had trouble getting noticed. 

Of course, it wouldn't be long before Brady was headed from San Mateo, California to Ann Arbor, Michigan in order to play football for the Wolverines. He probably had no trouble garnering attention by then. Still, it's funny to read about how he felt overlooked in his youth. 

He closed the essay explaining that he knew his sisters would always provide him support throughout his life, adding, "hopefully, just maybe, one day people will walk up to them and say, 'Aren't you Tommy's sister?' or 'Hey where is your brother?' Maybe . . . "

If the Brady sisters didn't get those kinds of comments by the time the baby of the family was given an 'A' for his English assignment, it probably didn't take long before they did. About seven years later, he took over as the starting quarterback of the Patriots.