Valentine's in-depth conversation with Bob Costas

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Valentine's in-depth conversation with Bob Costas

Every so often, something in the dozens (and dozens) of e-mails that arrive here daily catches your eye.

Like Bobby Valentine talking about an "amazing" conversation he had with Josh Beckett in which Beckett explained "the method to the madness" as to why he can be so, ah, deliberate on the mound. And how he plans to address the clubhouse problems with the Red Sox. And how he's learned to be less stubborn than he was during earlier managerial stints with the Rangers and Mets. (Hint: His time in Japan helped.)

It's all part of a transcript provided by the MLB Network of Valentine's conversation with Bob Costas for an episode of Studio 42 with Bob Costas that will air Monday at 9 p.m. It was a fascinating read that included . . . aw, you don't need me to tell you. Here's what they sent:

On whether any of the reported clubhouse behavior by Red Sox pitchers in 2011 would continue:
"I certainly hope not. I hope that its not because the big, bad policeman is standing on the corner and monitoring everything that is going on. I hope that its a conscious effort of players, coaches, clubhouse men, trainers all being on the same page, all understanding the difference between right and wrong. And I think they all know that if in fact that happened, that it was wrong and theyll try to right it . . .

"Im sure things will be addressed, but they need to be addressed and they need to get out of the way. We cant make like it really didnt happen. I wasnt here. I dont know what happened, and you know what Bob? I dont care what happened. The only thing I know is because it happened, I am here. Lets face it. So Im not going to try to figure out the past. Im going to try to figure out the present and the future."

On talking with Josh Beckett about his pitching rhythm:
"It was an amazing conversation that I had with him where he educated me about the method to the madness, and it is maddening, I think, for many to watch that. Many of the Yankees did complain. The reason they complained is in this competitive nature that Josh created, if he waited, they lost. They lost their rhythm. They lost their timing and they lost the at-bat. The more victories that he gained by waiting longer, the more he did it . . . Josh was very good. He watches video, he saw the cadence of some of these guys and he disrupted it. They say the job of a hitter is to time the pitch and the job of the pitcher is to disrupt the timing of the hitter. Well, thats what he was doing. Not with his pitches, but his pre-pitch setup. Now, the rule book does say that with nobody on base, it is twelve seconds. Now, maybe theyre going adjust that rule or maybe theyre not going to enforce that rule. Im not sure where were going with that."

On what he expects in 2012:
"Im expecting a wonderful spring training where I can get to know people. I think that this group of guys with the front office structure and the ownership structure and the fandom thats here, the 100-year anniversary of Fenway Park, there is going to be something special going on here this year and I think Im going to be part of it.

"I think Ill put the guys to work and make sure they understand that a foundation is very important and understand that theres nothing wrong with working hard and having fun as youre doing it to build this new group. This is not going to be the same team that started last year that everyone said was going to win 120 games and walk away with one of the toughest divisions in baseball. This is a team that has some question marks that we have to build around. This is a team that has gotten a little older over a year and this is a team that is competing against a lot tougher teams in the American League in 2012 than were here in 2011. So its time to wake up, smell the roses, drink the coffee and lets go to work.

On taking nine years to become a manager again:
"I dont think I was a fit in places like Seattle where theyre trying to build or Cleveland where they have their own sets of rules in things that theyre doing. Thats where the jobs were open. I think this was a questionable fit here and it became more of a fit the more I think Ben Cherington got to know me."

On accepting lineup suggestions from the front office and ownership:
"I dont think its anything new. I think Tom Grieve did that in Texas. Im sure he did. Steve Phillips did it in New York. Even Fred Wilpon a couple times made suggestions about what should be done and you know what? I did it a couple times because I was probably at that time in search of answers and you never know for sure whats that right answer. So yeah, lets try it. We can do that as long as youre willing to risk a few outs, a few innings and maybe even a game."

On what criticism of him has been fair in the past:
"I think early on I thought there was only one way and I got under a lot of peoples skin because of that. I learned that there is more than one way. I continue to try to appreciate and adjust, but there is a line where professionalism needs to exude itself and needs to raise above whatever else is going on, and I like my players to be as professional as they could possibly be."

On hows he learned to be less stubborn:
"I think that Japanese experience of six years of speaking another language in another country, eating another food, becoming a minority, let me understand that I couldnt just say it louder and I couldnt just say it with my name attached to it. I had to prove it and I had to also incorporate some of their ideas into what I was doing. Otherwise I couldnt last there."

On players not running balls out:
"It was too much to ask for the greatest player I ever managed. It was Rickey Henderson. The third time he did that in a Mets uniform was the last time he did it in a Mets uniform. He hit the one, he picked his jersey and he went looking into our dugout and the ball hit the top of the wall. He was at first base and a double play ensued and he was in a new uniform very shortly after."

On the infamous mustache he wore on June 9, 1999 during a New York Mets vs. Toronto Blue Jays game:
"The mustache and the glasses were basically Robin Venturas idea when he said, 'You have to go out there. You have to go out there.' . . . He gave me the glasses, I put them on. He gave me the hat, I put it on. I looked in the mirror and I said, 'No, I dont think this is going to get it,' and I took the eye-black stencil off and put one side on one side of my upper lip and I took the stencil off and put it on the other side and I looked at him and I said, 'What do you think?' and he said, 'Theyll never know.' Ten thousand dollars later and a couple days suspension, they all knew . . . No, I didnt know I was going to get caught. I was just standing there. I was on the bench. I was just standing down the stairs and I was only there for two batters. I wasnt there for the whole game. I guess I thought I would get noticed. I didnt know about caught."

On managing a National League-style of play:
"With 'Moneyball' and with a lot of the new terminologies that are out there, there is this term 'small ball', which is in fact baseball. Thats what baseball is. Home run ball, home run derby is that other thing that was played during the 1990s and strikeout ball is what you play in the backyard, but small ball is baseball, where youre actually advancing runners to gain an advantage to score runs to win the game. At times, baseball needs to be applied in all games that are close games. Sometimes, youre going to score more runs in one inning than the other team scores in the entire game, and those are blowouts and fun and days that I become a spectator a lot more than a director of what might be going on."

Belichick says all three QBs could use more game reps

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Belichick says all three QBs could use more game reps

Bill Belichick was expansive Saturday when asked on a conference call how he'll split the quarterback reps for the Patriots final preseason game Thursday in New York.

"I think that’s a good question, it’s a fair question, it’s one that we really have to give some good consideration to," Belichick began. "As I said before, I think whatever we do will benefit whoever does it. We want to get Jimmy [Garoppolo] ready for the Arizona game. Tom [Brady] isn’t going to be playing for a while, so it’s kind of his last chance to play until he comes back after a few weeks. Jacoby [Brissett] certainly could use all the playing time that he can get. I think that whichever players we play will benefit from it and it will be valuable to them. We could play all three quarterbacks a lot next week and they’d all benefit from that and it would all be good, but we can’t."

Since they can't, Belichick said there will be situational work done with whoever isn't going to get the game reps.

"We only have one game and so many snaps, so we’ll have to, between practice and the game, put them in some situations that are somewhat controllable like a two-minute situation or things like that that you know are going to kind of come up one way or another," said Belichick. "You can sort of control those in how you want those broken down, what’s best, what does each guy need and how can we get the best we need for each guy. I need to let them get the reps that they need, but it’s how do we get the team ready for what they need to be ready for. They all need to get ready for different things.

What Jimmy’s role is in a couple weeks is going to be a lot different than what Tom’s is, and it’s going to be a lot different than what Jacoby’s is. At some point later on, those roles are going to change again. So again, there’s no perfect solution to it. We’ll just do the best we can to try to have our individual players and our team as well prepared as possible at whatever point that is that we have to deal with, and whenever those situations come up."

As I wrote earlier today, this is the sticky and uncomfortable situation arising from Deflategate. It's not a Tom Brady penalty. It's a team penalty when one considers the ripple effects. And there's no handbook to consult.

 

Saturday's Red Sox-Royals lineups: Young in LF, Hill at 3B vs. KC lefty Duffy

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Saturday's Red Sox-Royals lineups: Young in LF, Hill at 3B vs. KC lefty Duffy

The Red Sox look to end their three-game losing streak tonight when the play the middle game of their three-game series with the Kansas City Royals at Fenway Park.

Against Royals' left-hander Danny Duffy (11-1, 2.66 ERA), the Red Sox start right-handed hitters Chris Young in left field and Aaron Hill at third base. Duffy has won his past 10 decisions and came into Saturday with the fifth-best ERA in the American League. He joined the rotation from the bullpen on June 1.

Left-hander David Price (12-8, 4.00) gets the start for the Red Sox. Price has won his past three decisions, going eight, six and eight innings and not allowing more than three runs in each start. 

The Royals won the series opener 6-3 Friday night.

The lineups:

ROYALS
Paulo Orlando CF
Cheslor Cuthbert 3B
Lorenzo Cain RF
Eric Hosmer 1B
Kendrys Morales DH
Salvador Perez C
Alex Gordon LF
Alcides Escobar SS
Christian Colon 2B
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Danny Duffy LHP

RED SOX
Dustin Pedroia 2B
Xander Bogaerts SS
David Ortiz DH
Mookie Betts RF
Hanley Ramirez 1B
Sandy Leon C
Chris Young LF
Aaron Hill 3B
Jackie Bradley Jr. CF
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David Price LHP

Saturday, Aug. 27: Adding toughness Habs' priority

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Saturday, Aug. 27: Adding toughness Habs' priority

Here are all the links from around the hockey world, and what I’m reading, after a busy morning celebrating my 3-year-old’s birthday at the trampoline park. Yee-ha.

*PHT writer Joey Alfieri says that adding toughness was a big offseason priority for the Montreal Canadiens.

*There’s at least one big fan of the Edmonton Oilers trade that brought defenseman Adam Larsson from the New Jersey Devils, and that fan’s name is Mark Letestu.

*Here’s everything you need to know about the Ice Guardians movie premiering this fall that takes a long, balanced look at the NHL enforcers.

*Roberto Luongo has an alibi for the robbery in Winnipeg with one suspect getting away in goalie equipment, and it’s funny as you would expect it to be.

*CSN Washington takes a look at the New York Rangers in their season previews for the Metro Division.

*I’m not entirely sure whether this “RIP Harambe” thing is genuine or meant to be ironic by the largely millenial group that seem so enamored with it, but I think it’s just stupid. I think the same with the crying Jordan meme…also stupid.

*For something completely different: a look at how Triumph the Insult Comic Dog learned how to poop on Trump’s politics.