Valentine: Not entirely comfortable with three catchers

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Valentine: Not entirely comfortable with three catchers

BOSTON The Red Sox currently have three catchers on their 25-man roster. An unusual situation at this point in the season, something that is more common after rosters expand on Sept. 1.

But, when outfielder Daniel Nava was placed on the disabled list Wednesday, Ryan Lavarnway was called up from Triple-A Pawtucket, joining catchers Jarrod Saltalamacchia and Kelly Shoppach.

On Wednesday Saltalamacchia started behind the plate, with Shoppach and Lavarnway on the bench. On Thursday, Lavarnway caught, with the other two sitting. Friday, with Saltalamacchia at home suffering from food poisoning, Shoppach caught and Lavarnway started as the designated hitter.

Having three catchers is not a situation with which manager Bobby Valentine is entirely comfortable. The main challenge is finding adequate playing time for all.

I dont know how permanent the three-catcher situations going to be, Valentine said. Its nothing Ive ever been comfortable with or even tried to do. But, if they're here the whole time, I will get them work behind the plate.

Its not the personnel with which Valentine is uncomfortable. Its the concept.

These three catchers, Im not uncomfortable, he said. Just the concept of three catchers is something I havent had on rosters before.

With David Ortiz still on the DL (he was eligible to be activated Wednesday), Mauro Gomez could have been an option for a call-up instead of Lavarnway. Gomez appeared in nine games for the Sox earlier this season, batting .300 (9-for-30) with three doubles, three RBI, a walk, and seven strikeouts.

It was probably an option, Valentine said. Lavarnways caught an awful lot, also (80 games for Pawtucket, and we feel if hes just used as a hitter, its not so bad.

Sandoval’s offseason transformation doesn't guarantee he's Sox starting third baseman

Sandoval’s offseason transformation doesn't guarantee he's Sox starting third baseman

BOSTON - The weight room, as much as Instagram, has been Pablo Sandoval’s home in the offseason leading up to the 2017 season.

His change in diet and routine have clearly led to visible results, at least in terms of appearance. His play is yet to be determined. But his manager and teammates have taken notice.

“Compliments to Pablo,” John Farrell told reporters before Thursday’s BBWAA dinner. “He’s done a great job with the work that he’s put in, the commitment he’s made. He’s reshaped himself, that’s apparent. He knows there’s work to be done to regain an everyday job at third base. So, we’ll see how that unfolds. We’re not looking for him to be someone he’s not been in the past. Return to that level of performance.”

Farrell noted that Brock Holt and Josh Rutledge are the other two players in contention for time at third base and while others, such as prospect Rafael Devers, may get time there in the spring, those are the only three expected to compete for the job.

“The beauty of last spring is that there’s a note of competition in camp,” Farrell said. “And that was born out of third base last year [when Travis Shaw beat out Sandoval at the third base]. That won’t change.”

Sandoval's 2016 season ended after shoulder surgery in April. 

While the manager has to be cautiously optimistic, Sandoval’s teammates can afford to get their hopes up.

“Pablo is definitely going to bounce back,” Xander Bogaerts told CSNNE.com “Especially with the weight he’s lost and the motivation he has to prove a lot of people wrong, to prove the fans wrong.

“He’s been a great player for his whole career. He’s not a bad player based on one year. Playing in Boston the first year is tough, so, hopefully this year he’ll be better.”

Prior to Sandoval’s abysmal 2015, his first season in Boston, when he hit .245 with 47 RBI in 126 games, the 2012 World Series MVP was a career .294 hitter who averaged 15 home runs and 66 RBI a year.

If Bogaerts is right and Sandoval can be that player again, that will be a huge lift in filling in the gap David Ortiz left in Boston’s offense.

Scott's taste of big-league life with Red Sox has him hungering for more

Scott's taste of big-league life with Red Sox has him hungering for more

CHESNUT HILL -- The Red Sox Rookie Development Program is designed to help young players prepare for what playing at the major-league level is like,. That can be valuable for a prospect like Rafael Devers, who hasn’t even made it to Double-A.

But of the eight-man cast at the workout this year, there’s one guy who actually has major-league experience.

Robby Scott joined the Red Sox as a September call-up last season and turned some heads, holding opponents scoreless over six innings of work.

Now the lefty is back working with younger guys to prepare himself for spring training -- something he’s itching to get started.

“It’s one thing that we always talk about,” the left-handed reliever told CSNNE.com “It’s a tough road to get there, but it’s an even tougher and harder road to stay there. And having that taste in September last year was incredible to be a part of it.”

That taste Scott had last fall has only made the desire to rejoin Boston greater.

“Yeah, because now you know what it’s like,” Scott said CSNNE.com. “You see it and you’re there and you’re a part of it. And it’s like, ‘Man, I wanna be there.’ You’re a little bit more hungry.”

And his hunger to pitch with the Red Sox only becomes greater at an event like this where he’s the only one with MLB time.

“They ask on a consistent basis,” Scott started, “ ‘What’s it like?’ ‘What was it like getting there the first day?’ ‘How did the guys react?’ ‘What was it like dealing with the media?’

“That’s what this program is here for, just to kind of gives these guys a little taste of what it is like and get familiar with the circumstances.

While the experience and constant discussion invites players to try to do more in the offseason or change their routine, the 27-year-old has stayed the course, trusting what’s gotten him there.

“The offseason training stays the same, nothing really changes on that side of things,” Scott said. “Nothing changes. Go about my business the way I have the last six, seven years.”