Valentine: Matsuzaka 'is ready to pitch'


Valentine: Matsuzaka 'is ready to pitch'

BOSTON On Saturday, Daisuke Matsuzaka will make his first major league start in more than a year, one day shy of exactly one year since he had Tommy John surgery.Matsuzaka will be starting in place of Daniel Bard, whose struggles in the rotation earned him a trip to Triple-A Pawtucket on Tuesday.He was in today. Says he feels fine, said manager Bobby Valentine before Wednesdays game against the Orioles. Hell be, unless something changes, well try to activate him, pitch him on Saturday. Obviously, well wait till that date comes around.Matsuzakas last major league start was May 16, 2011, against the Orioles. He went 4 13 innings, giving up five runs on five hits and seven walks with two strikeouts. He was placed on the disabled list the next day (retroactively) and underwent surgery on June 10.He made the last of his eight rehab starts over two rehab stints Tuesday night, going 1 13 innings with Pawtucket against Indianapolis. He gave up one run on three hits with two walks and two strikeouts.In all, he threw 28 13 innings with High-A Salem, Double-A Portland, and Pawtucket, posting a record of 0-2 with a 3.49 ERA. He gave up 12 runs, 11 earned, on 22 hits, with seven walks, 20 strikeouts, and five home runs. He has an opponents average of .214, a 1.081 walks-and-hits-per-nine innings ratio, 7.5 hits-per-nine innings, 2.2 walks-per-nine-innings, 7.3 strikeouts-per-nine, and 3.33 strikeouts-per-walks.Matsuzaka was on two separate 30-day rehab assignments. He was pulled back from the first one when he developed an issue in his right trapezoid muscle. He has made two starts since then, on his second assignment.It all kind of smoothed out, Valentine said. There was a little doubt about his elbow even. And it was one of those wake-up days and just felt it was a thing of the past and thats what we needed.But with a starting pitcher whos been away from a major league mound for so long, its difficult for Valentine to know what to expect for Saturday.Well, I dont think it will be an inning, but, Valentine said, as he knocked on wood, you never know. Hes competitive. Hes competitive. Hes ready to pitch. Hes thrown as many as 93 pitches in the rehab. His arm feels good, his bodys good shape. So, theres some length there.Valentine has said hed like Matsuzaka to once again resemble the pitcher he saw in Japan.Oh, I might have said that during the winter, Valentine said. Thatd be nice, but he hasnt had a time to really fine-tune all the pitches. I remember him as multi-pitcher guy. I havent seen that. You know what I have seen, a changeup in a couple games that resembled something I remembered. But I dont think its ready for home use.He had pitches that moved at different speeds and directions.Prior to the problem with the trap muscle, Matsuzaka had been having trouble finding a consistent arm angle. Valentine is confident the right-hander has resolved that issue.Yeah. Part of that, yknow that search, is he was kind of trying to replicate the pain, Valentine said. He was trying to do things that might be abnormal to see in fact if his elbow would hold up. Its kind of a test and I think hes over that.

Bradley, Betts, Pedroia are A.L. Gold Glove finalists


Bradley, Betts, Pedroia are A.L. Gold Glove finalists

Jackie Bradley Jr. in center field, Mookie Betts in right and Dustin Pedroia at second base are the Red Sox' finalists for the American League Gold Glove awards.

The Blue Jays’ Kevin Pillar and the Rays’ Kevin Kiermaier are the other A.L. center field finalists. The White Sox’ Adam Eaton and Astros’ George Springer are A.L. right field finalists. Joining Pedroia as second base finalists are the Mariners’ Robinson Cano and Tigers’ Ian Kinsler.

Peoria has won four Gold Gloves. Bradley and Betts have yet to win one.

The full list of finalists is here.  The awards will be presented on Nov. 8 at 8 p.m. on ESPN

The Red Sox sent out a series of tweets backing each player’s candidacy.

Betts is also a front-runner for the American League Most Valuable Player.


Ortiz wins Hank Aaron Award as top hitter in American League


Ortiz wins Hank Aaron Award as top hitter in American League

CLEVELAND -- David Ortiz is heading into retirement with some more hardware.

The Boston Red Sox slugger captured the Hank Aaron Award on Wednesday as the top hitter in the American League this season. Budding Chicago Cubs star Kris Bryant was honored as the top hitter in the National League.

The award was presented before Game 2 of the World Series between the Cubs and Cleveland. It was determined through a combination of fan voting and a panel that includes Aaron and other Hall of Fame players.

The 40-year-old Ortiz hit .315 with 38 home runs, 127 RBIs and 48 doubles in the 20th and final season of his major league career. His 541 career home runs rank 17th all-time.

The 24-year-old Bryant hit .292 with 39 home runs and 102 RBIs while helping the Cubs cruise to the NL Central title and eventually a spot in the World Series. Shortly after being honored, Bryant singled in the first inning for his first Series hit.