Sox offense 'not working'

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Sox offense 'not working'

DETROIT -- It's impossible to lay the blame anywhere else but on Josh Beckett for Saturday's 10-0 shellacking by the Detroit Tigers. Beckett was shelled for five homers and seven runs in just 4 23 innings.

But after two games, the Red Sox offense is lacking, too. In 18 innings so far, they've scored just two runs and both of those came in the same inning -- the ninth inning on Opening Day against Tigers' closer Jose Valverde.

That means the Sox' offense has been held scoreless in 17 of the 18 innings to date.

"We've got to do a better job,'' said catcher Jarrod Saltalamacchia, who authored the only extra-base hit the Sox got yesterday, smacking a leadoff double in the third. "We've got to get guys on base, we've got some get some runs. We've got to get these pitchers some room to breathe so they can go out there and pitch a little more comfortable.''

In the two games to date, Red Sox hitters are hitting a collective .188 and have just two hits in 12 at-bats with runners in scoring position. They've stranded 12 baserunners in two games and have struck out 19 times in two games.

Kevin Youkilis, the No. 5 hitter in the lineup, is hitless in eight at-bats and has struck out four times. He's gotten the ball out of the infield just once in two games.

"I haven't had good at-bats,'' admitted Youkilis. "But, hey, in 162 games, you're going to have two bad games. These are two bad ones. Hopefully, after the two bad ones, I start
clicking real well and helping this team win.''

"I guess we've got to come back and make better adjustments,'' said DH David Ortiz, who's had some good at-bats with three hits and sacrifice fly in the two games. "It's going to happen. Everybody's adrenaline is high right now and wants to do good. That's part of the game.''

With just three bench players available to him thanks to a 13-man pitching staff, it's not like manager Bobby Valentine has the flexibility to try a lot of different things.

But, clearly, something has to change.

"We definitely have to make some adjustments,'' said Saltalamacchia. "What we're doing now is not working.''

Kevin Walsh: An unforgettable encounter with Arnold Palmer

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Kevin Walsh: An unforgettable encounter with Arnold Palmer

With the passing of Arnold Palmer, CSN's Kevin Walsh looks back on an unforgettable encounter he had with the golf legend

It was May 2000.  I had just finished playing golf at Pebble Beach.  I walked out of the clubhouse and a Lincoln Town Car pulled up to the putting green, Arnold Palmer hopped out. It was as if he’d fallen out of the sky. 

I had my tape recorder with me and asked if I could ask him a few questions about being a caddy in his younger years in Latrobe, Pennsylvania. 

“Yes, but I have only about five minutes,” he said.

I was very nervous and having trouble putting the cassette tape into the recorder.  He eventually took it out of my hands and did it for me. 

My nerves were gone.

So we’re talking and the door to The Lodge bursts open and a guy yells “Hey Arnold!  We’re in the bar having a beer!”

“Well,” Arnold yells back, “Order me one!”

Arnold was hard of hearing.  He saddled up next to me, and tilted his head so I could talk right into his ear. I couldn’t believe I was talking directly into Arnold Palmer’s ear. He was practically stepping on my feet. He wore tiny hearing aids that were only visible if you were as close as I was.

After ten minutes of talking, I reminded him that he had friends waiting, and a beer that was probably warm by that time.  He wanted to make sure that I had enough.  I did and I was beaming.  I’m not sure my feet touched the ground on the walk back to the car.  

Golf legend Arnold Palmer passes away at 87

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Golf legend Arnold Palmer passes away at 87

Arnold Palmer brought a country-club sport to the masses with a hard-charging style, charisma and a commoner's touch. At ease with both presidents and the golfing public, and on a first-name basis with both, "The King," died Sunday in Pittsburgh. He was 87.

Alastair Johnson, CEO of Arnold Palmer Enterprises, confirmed that Palmer died Sunday afternoon of complications from heart problems.

Palmer ranked among the most important figures in golf history, and it went well beyond his seven major championships and 62 PGA Tour wins. His good looks, devilish grin and go-for-broke manner made the elite sport appealing to one and all. And it helped that he arrived about the same time as television moved into most households, a perfect fit that sent golf to unprecedented popularity.

Beyond his golf, Palmer was a pioneer in sports marketing, paving the way for scores of other athletes to reap in millions from endorsements. Some four decades after his last PGA Tour win, he ranked among the highest-earners in golf.

On the golf course, Palmer was an icon not for how often he won, but the way he did it.