Sox comeback in 9th falls short, Angels win 9-5

Sox comeback in 9th falls short, Angels win 9-5
June 8, 2013, 5:00 pm
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BOSTON – Left-hander Felix Doubront has not completed the seventh inning in any of his 10 starts this season.  He left after the sixth inning Saturday afternoon, in the first game of the day-night doubleheader with the Red Sox trailing the Angels by a run.
 
Franklin Morales, making just his second appearance of the season and first since five-inning start May 30 at Philadelphia, replaced Doubront. Morales, though, offered anything but relief, quickly turning a one-run game into a five-run game.
 
In two-thirds of an inning, Morales -- who manager John Farrell said before the game was a candidate to start Wednesday at Tampa Bay -- faced eight batters with four scoring. He gave up two hits, with four walks, one intentional. Morales walked in runs, walking the final three batters, throwing 10 straight balls. Of the 30 pitches he threw, just nine were strikes.
 
Clayton Mortensen replaced Morales, giving up a single to Erick Aybar, allowing a run to score. Mortensen has allowed four of 12 inherited runners to score this season.
 
Doubront took the loss, falling to 4-3 with a 4.84 ERA, as the Sox fell to the Angels, 9-5. Doubront went He went six innings, giving up three runs on six hits and two walks with four strikeouts.
 
Angels right-hander Tommy Hanson earned the win, improving to 3-2.  He went five innings, giving up two runs on seven hits and four walks with four strikeouts, a wild pitch, and a home run.
 
The Angels got a run in the second as  Howie Kendrick led off with a single, went to second on Alberto Callaspo’s groundout, and scoring on Erick Aybar’s single.
 
They added two in the third as Mike Trout led off with a double and Josh Hamilton walked. After a double steal, Trout scored on Albert Pujols’ sacrifice fly with Hamilton taking third. Hamilton then scored on Mark Trumbo’s groundout.
 
The Red Sox got two runs in the fourth as Mike Carp led off with a home run, his fifth of the season. With two outs, Jacoby Ellsbury walked and stole second base, scoring on Daniel Nava’s single.
 
The Angels added two runs in the eighth off Mortensen and Andrew Miller.
 
With two outs in the ninth, the Sox rallied for three runs on five consecutive hits off right-hander Garrett Richards by Mike Napoli, Jarrod Saltalamacchia, Mike Carp, Stephen Drew, and Jose Iglesias. But that was all the Sox would get, as Ernesto Frieri struck out Ellsbury, recording his 14th save.

AT A GLANCE
 
STAR OF THE GAME: Mike Trout
Trout went 3-for-5 with two doubles, two runs scored, and an RBI, extending his hitting streak to nine games.
 
In four career games at Fenway he is batting .474, going 9-for-19 with two doubles, three RBI, three stolen bases, and four walks.
 
HONORABLE MENTION: Tommy Hanson
In just his second outing after missing almost four weeks on the bereavement list after a death in the family, Hanson earned the win, improving to 3-2.  He went five innings, giving up two runs on seven hits and four walks with four strikeouts, a wild pitch, and a home run.
 
He had thrown nine straight scoreless innings against the Sox before giving up two runs in the fourth.
 
THE GOAT: Franklin Morales
In two-thirds of an inning, Morales faced eight batters with four scoring. He gave up two hits, with four walks, one intentional. Morales walked in two runs, walking the final three batters, throwing 10 straight balls. Of the 30 pitches he threw, just nine were strikes.
 
THE TURNING POINT:
With two outs and a runner on second base in the seventh inning Franklin Morales intentionally walked Albert Pujols to pitch to Mark Trumbo, who laced an RBI double down the right field line, scoring the first of four Angels runs that inning.

BY THE NUMBERS: 8
Sox pitchers combined to walk eight batters, matching a season high for the sixth time. Four of those walks eventually scored.
 
QUOTE OF NOTE:
“I try to throw strikes. I was just trying to do my job. I miss a couple of pitches. I couldn’t find the zone. I try to throw different pitches. I move on the [pitching] rubber. Things [like wildness] happen in baseball.” – Franklin Morales