Scott: Red Sox fans are arrogant, vulgar

Scott: Red Sox fans are arrogant, vulgar
March 1, 2012, 6:17 pm
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What's that saying, "It takes one to know one"?

Yeah, that's it.

Meet Luke Scott. A career .264 hitter with above average power and a below average brain. You probably remember Scott for his heroics in the last game of the season when the Orioles beat the Red Sox, eventually knocking them out of the playoffs.

Oh wait, no you don't. Scott had nothing to do with it much like he had nothing to do with the entire season, playing in just 64 games and hitting a paltry .220.

But that didn't stop Scott, now with the Tampa Bay Rays, from opening up his yapper once again (Last year he caused a stir when he said he didn't believe President Barack Obama was born in America). Scott was asked by MLB.com about the last game of the 2011 season, in which he reflected upon by saying how much sweeter it was because, well, he hates Red Sox fans.

"Just their arrogance," Scott said of Sox fans. "The fans come in and they take over the city. They're ruthless. They're vulgar. They cause trouble. They talk about your family. Swear at you. Who likes that? When people do that, it just gives you more incentive to beat them. Then when things like the last game of last season happen, you celebrate even more. You go to St. Louis -- classiest fans in the game. You do well, there's no vulgarity. You know what? You don't wish them bad."

The fact that Red Sox fans have the ability to "take over the city" says more about Orioles fans than Red Sox fans. While most baseball players would -- and do -- love Red Sox fans' passion, Scott takes it negatively.

But don't think that he takes the high road. He made sure to give it right back to the fans when the Orioles ended their beloved Sawx' season.

"The clubhouse afterward was like we'd just won the World Series -- a lot of celebrating, a lot of high emotions," Scott said.

Like Scott would have any idea what winning the World Series was like...

"Everybody's giving high-fives, then all of a sudden Longoria homers. Everybody's in the clubhouse and it's like, Bam! And we're like, 'Go home Boston! Pack your bags. See you next year.'"

But Scott took it even further, and out of the locker room. He was so happy to be the guy who watched from the clubhouse as his last place team won a game, that he made the drive home that night his own personal victory parade.

"I got to see a priceless thing driving back to my apartment," Scott said. "I see all the Boston fans walking around, and I mean they were crying crocodile tears.

"It was like someone shot their dog. I rolled down the window and I'm like, 'Ah, hah, sucks doesn't it, when someone laughs or makes fun of you when things aren't going your way.'"

Hey Scott, we got a feeling your whole family is going down.