Schilling: Members of the Red Sox encouraged me to use PEDs

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Schilling: Members of the Red Sox encouraged me to use PEDs

UPDATE: Curt Schilling subsequently clarified his comments to say the person who made the suggestion "wasn't anyone in uniform, nor the baseball ops group."

In 2005, Curt Schilling famously went to Congress as one of several major leaguers to testify about the use of performance enhancing drugs in baseball. Three years later, as a member of the Red Sox, inside the team clubhouse, he says he was encouraged to use PEDs to extend his career.

Schilling conducted an interview with ESPN Radio on Thursday and discussed his story.

At the end of my career, in 2008 when I had gotten hurt, there was a conversation that I was involved in, in which it was brought to my attention that this is a potential path I might want to pursue, Schilling told ESPN's Colin Cowherd.

Schilling wouldn't name names when asked about the conversation, and who brought the idea to his attention.

Former members of the organization, he said. Theyre no longer there. But it was an incredibly uncomfortable conversation because it came up in the midst of a group of people. The other people werent in the conversation, but they could clearly hear the conversation, and it was suggested to me that at my age, and in my situation, why not, what did I have to lose? Because if I wasnt going to get healthy, it didnt matter, and if I did get healthy, great.

It caught me off guard, to say the least, but that was an awkward situation.

From Hardball Talk:
The fact that he and the Red Sox differed on the sort of treatment he received back in 2008 was well-reported at the time, but no one to my knowledge ever talked about this sort of thing. And, its worth noting, Schilling has been known to engage in hyperbole in the past.That said, this is quite an accusation. It seems to me that such an accusation is every bit as worthy of investigation by MLB as the Miami New Times story. Especially if the people hes referring to still have jobs in Major League Baseball.Schilling signed a one-year deal with the Red Sox for 2008 but did not play because of a shoulder injury. He officially retired the next season.

You can listen to the interview here.

Red Sox-Indians ALDS matchup becoming increasingly likely

Red Sox-Indians ALDS matchup becoming increasingly likely

BOSTON - The Red Sox knew they'd be in the playoffs last weekend when they clinched a postseason berth for the first time since 2013.

On Wednesday, they became division champs and knew they'd avoided the dreaded wild-card game.

ANALYSIS: Nick Friar looks at potential Red Sox-Indians matchup

They still don't know their first-round opponent, though it's becoming increasingly likely that it will be the Cleveland Indians.

Here's why: the Red Sox' loss to the Yankees on Thursday night leaves them with a 92-67 record with three games remaining, the second-best mark -- for now -- among the three A.L. division winners.

The Texas Rangers, at 94-65, retain the best record, with the Indians, at 91-67, a half-game behind the Sox.

The team with the best record of the three will enter the playoffs as the No. 1 seed, and will be matched against the winner of Tuesday's A.L. wild-card matchup.

To finish with the A.L.'s best record and host the wild-card winner, the Red Sox essentially need to sweep the Toronto Blue Jays on the final weekend and hope that the Rangers get swept by Tampa Bay.

That's because a tie between the Red Sox and Rangers in the standings would make the Rangers the top seed by virtue of the second tie-breaker: intra-division play.

(The first tie-breaker is head-to-head play; the Sox and Rangers split the season series, sending them to the second tie-breaker).

In other words, the Rangers have a magic number of one to clinch the best record in the A.L. and gain home-field advantage throughout the postseason. One more Red Sox loss or one more Rangers win would get the Rangers locked into the top spot.

Again, barring a sweep by the Sox and the Rangers getting swept, a matchup in the Division Series with Cleveland seems almost inevitable.

What's not known is where that series will begin, and here's where it gets tricky.

Because the Indians and Detroit Tigers were rained out Thursday, the Tribe will have played only 161 games by the time the regular season ends early Sunday evening.

That could force the Indians and Tigers to play a makeup game on Monday, since the game could have playoff seeding implications for the Indians and Tigers. Detroit is still in the running for the A.L. wild card spot, currently a game-and-a-half behind the Orioles and Jays.

Since the Red Sox won the season series against the Indians 4-2, the Sox can clinch home field by winning two-of-three games from Toronto this weekend.

Should the Sox win two from the Jays, it would wipe out the need for Monday's makeup -- at least as far as the Indians are concerned. It's possible that it would still need to be played to determine the one of the wild card spots.

No matter who wins home field in a likely Red Sox-Indians matchup, the Division Series between the two will start with games next Thursday and Friday. After a travel day, the series would resume Sunday and Monday, Oct. 9-10.

Should the Sox win home field and host the first two games, Game 3 would be played Sunday Oct. 9 in Cleveland -- on the same day and in the same city where Tom Brady will make his return to the Patriots.