Schilling: Members of the Red Sox encouraged me to use PEDs

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Schilling: Members of the Red Sox encouraged me to use PEDs

UPDATE: Curt Schilling subsequently clarified his comments to say the person who made the suggestion "wasn't anyone in uniform, nor the baseball ops group."

In 2005, Curt Schilling famously went to Congress as one of several major leaguers to testify about the use of performance enhancing drugs in baseball. Three years later, as a member of the Red Sox, inside the team clubhouse, he says he was encouraged to use PEDs to extend his career.

Schilling conducted an interview with ESPN Radio on Thursday and discussed his story.

At the end of my career, in 2008 when I had gotten hurt, there was a conversation that I was involved in, in which it was brought to my attention that this is a potential path I might want to pursue, Schilling told ESPN's Colin Cowherd.

Schilling wouldn't name names when asked about the conversation, and who brought the idea to his attention.

Former members of the organization, he said. Theyre no longer there. But it was an incredibly uncomfortable conversation because it came up in the midst of a group of people. The other people werent in the conversation, but they could clearly hear the conversation, and it was suggested to me that at my age, and in my situation, why not, what did I have to lose? Because if I wasnt going to get healthy, it didnt matter, and if I did get healthy, great.

It caught me off guard, to say the least, but that was an awkward situation.

From Hardball Talk:
The fact that he and the Red Sox differed on the sort of treatment he received back in 2008 was well-reported at the time, but no one to my knowledge ever talked about this sort of thing. And, its worth noting, Schilling has been known to engage in hyperbole in the past.That said, this is quite an accusation. It seems to me that such an accusation is every bit as worthy of investigation by MLB as the Miami New Times story. Especially if the people hes referring to still have jobs in Major League Baseball.Schilling signed a one-year deal with the Red Sox for 2008 but did not play because of a shoulder injury. He officially retired the next season.

You can listen to the interview here.

Former Red Sox prospect Andy Marte killed in car crash in Dominican Republic

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Former Red Sox prospect Andy Marte killed in car crash in Dominican Republic

Former major leaguer Andy Marte, a one-time top prospect in the Red Sox organization, was killed in a car crash in the Dominican Republic on Sunday. He was 33.

Marte was killed the same day that Royals pitcher Yordano Ventura died in a separate car crash in the Dominican. Ventura was 25. Coincidentally, Ventura was the Royals starting pitcher in Marte's final major league game, for the Arizona Diamondbacks on Aug. 6, 2014.

Marte, drafted by the Braves in 2000, was ranked the No. 9 prospect in baseball in 2005 when the third baseman was traded to the Red Sox as part of the deal that sent shortstop Edgar Renteria to Atlanta and Marte became the top-ranked prospect in the Red Sox organization.  

Marte was traded by the Red Sox to the Indians in 2006 in the deal that sent Coco Crisp to Boston and spent five seasons with Cleveland. His best season was 2009 (.232, six home runs, 25 RBI in 47 games). After a six-game stint with Arizona in 2014, he played in South Korea the past two years.  

Metropolitan traffic authorities in the Dominican told the Associated Press that Marte died when a car he was driving his a house along the highway between San Francisco de Macoris and Pimentel, about 95 miles (150 kilometers) north of the capital.
 

Royals pitcher Yordano Ventura killed in car crash in Dominican Republic

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Royals pitcher Yordano Ventura killed in car crash in Dominican Republic

Kansas City Royals pitcher Yordano Ventura was killed in a car crash in in the Dominican Republic on Sunday morning, according to multiple reports. Ventura was 25 years old.

Highway patrol spokesman Jacobo Mateo told the Associated Press that Ventura died on a highway leading to the town of Juan Adrian, about 40 miles (70 kilometers) northwest of Santo Domingo. He says it's not clear if Ventura was driving.

Ventura was killed the same day former major leaguer Andy Marte died in a separate car crash in the Dominican. Coincidentally, Ventura was the starting pitcher in Marte's final MLB game, for the Arizona Diamondbacks on Aug. 6, 2014. 

Ventura was 13-8 with a 4.08 ERA for the Royals' 2015 World Series champions and 11-12 with a 4.45 ERA in 32 starts in 2016. The right-hander made his major league debut in 2013 and in 2014 went 14-10 with a 3.20 ERA for Kansas City's A.L. pennant winners. 

Ironically, Ventura paid tribute to his good friend and fellow Dominican, Oscar Tavares, who was also killed in a car crash in the D.R. in October 2014, by wearing Tavares' initials and R.I.P. on his cap before Ventura's start in Game 6 of the World Series in 2014. 

Ventura is the second current major league player to die in the past five months. Former Miami Marlins ace Jose Fernandez was killed in a boating accident in Miami on Sept. 25.