Ross has good swing for Fenway replica


Ross has good swing for Fenway replica

FORT MYERS, Fla. It's been said Cody Ross has the perfect swing for Fenway Park a righthanded hitter strong enough to pull the ball, with an uppercut swing.

It will be another month before Ross can put that theory to the test the Sox' home opener isn't until April 13 but if Saturday is any indication, there's something to that theory.

Getting his first game swings at JetBlue Park, which is modeled after Fenway, Ross hit two homers over The Wall in left, including a grand slam.

"Obviously, any time you swing the bat well whether it's Little League or if it's against college pitching or major league pitching it feels good," said Ross after the Sox blanked Northeastern 25-0. "I like it. It plays a lot better to my swing than a lot of parks that I've played in.

"But it's something you can't get too concerned about. You have to stay with your game and try to hit the ball wherever they pitch it. Today, they left a couple out over the plate."

"He got a couple of balls up," said manager Bobby Valentine, "and was able to elevate them and hit the high fly ball like he does. We've all seen that swing before in post-season, haven't we, in the Giants' march (to the World Series in 2010). He's got that swing and I think it will play at Fenway."

Ross spent his last five seasons with either Pro Player Park (or Dolphin Stadium) in Miami or AT&T Park in San Francisco as his home ballpark. Both are spacious; neither is helpful to hitters.

Fenway, of course, can be very inviting for hitters.

"I'd be lying if I said I hadn't thought about (how I'd do in more of a hitter's park)," he said. "Any hitter who claims to have some power wants to hit in a hitter's ballpark. It just so happens that Fenway fits well for righthanded swings."

"But I try not to think about it too much. You can get yourself into a lot of trouble thinking about that wall the whole time. I'll take what I got today and try to get better."

Regardless of the environment, Ross has a checklist of things he wants to do at the plate this season: stay balanced, keep his hands back and not get out in front of pitches.

David Backes out at least 2 more games (and likely longer) after elbow procedure


David Backes out at least 2 more games (and likely longer) after elbow procedure

The Bruins look like they’ll be without gritty veteran forward David Backes for at least the next couple of games, and probably more like the next couple of weeks.

It was announced that the gritty Bruins forward underwent a procedure on Monday remove the olecranon bursa from his elbow, and that “his condition will be updated after the weekend.” The procedure is commonly performed when bursitis in the elbow becomes an untenable, and seems more like an injury that worsens over time rather than anything that happened in a particular game this season.

Backes’ effectiveness did seem to be impacted after he got into a fight with Nazem Kadri in the second game of the season in Toronto, but it’s unknown if there’s any connection between that sequence and the forward’s elbow issues. According to the AAOS (American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons) website, it may take “10-14 days” for the skin to heal following the procedure, and three-to-four weeks before a doctor would clear the average person to resume normal activity.

The 32-year-old Backes is off to a good start for the Bruins with two goals and four points in five games prior to missing Tuesday night’s loss to the Minnesota Wild, and his absence makes an already-thin Bruins forward group smaller, softer and much less dangerous. With Backes on the shelf for at least the next two games against the Rangers and Detroit Red Wings, the Bruins have recalled young center Austin Czarnik after his short stint with the Providence Bruins.