Report: Mauer on trade waivers; could Sox be interested?

867915.jpg

Report: Mauer on trade waivers; could Sox be interested?

Now that the Red Sox have freed up over 275 million in their recent blockbuster deal with the Dodgers, how long will they stick to their guns and make sure they spend on the right free agents? How long can they stay disciplined with all their new found cash?

FoxSports.com's Ken Rosenthal asks the question after he reported yesterday that Twins catcher Joe Mauer was placed on waivers.

From Fox Sports:
If the Sox truly intend to be more disciplined, as Ben Cherington suggested after the team sent first baseman Adrian Gonzalez, right-hander Josh Beckett and left fielder Carl Crawford to the Dodgers, lets see where they will draw the line.

Lets see them pass on Mauer, a player who once was their Holy Grail.

Mauer, 29, has about 142.5 million remaining on his contract, including 138 million from 2013 to 18. The Sox are unlikely to take on that much money so soon after busting out of payroll jail, according to a source with knowledge of the clubs thinking. But they should be tempted to claim Mauer before his waivers expire at 1 p.m. ET Wednesday, dont you think?

Mauer has a full no-trade clause in his contract, but he's spent most of his life in the Minnesota area, and they aren't exactly close to becoming a World Series contender.

For a deal to go down, though, as Rosenthal points out, the Red Sox would have to give up some of its best prospects to the Twins, which is what got them in the mess they're in in the first place.

What would you do? Claim Mauer and give up young arms like Felix Doubront and Matt Barnes? Or leave Mauer be and continue to build up the farm?

Let us know what you think in the comment box below.

Red Sox understand first-inning woes are putting pressure on offense

Red Sox understand first-inning woes are putting pressure on offense

ST. PETERSBURG, FLa. -- Not long ago, the Red Sox were repeatedly taking first-inning leads, often with multi-run innings.

These days, of course, it's the other way round. The Red Sox haven't scored a first-inning run since June 11, while the opposition is piling up the runs, with 22 scored in the last 15 games prior to Tuesday.

"Two weeks ago,'' said John Farrell, "we were talking about how much pressure it takes off (our) pitcher when you go out and score (in the first). We're living the other side of both of those right now.''

The Red Sox recognize the problem, but fixing isn't easy, namely because the issue is not the same for every starter.

The Sox are satisfied with their approach. What they have to change are the results.

"To go out and command the baseball from the start,'' said Farrell, "that's what we're all working toward getting better at. It's pretty clear where we need to improve.''

"Obviously, it makes it difficult for the offense,'' said pitching coach Carl Willis of the recent habit of falling behind. "to start off in a hole. It kind of sucks some energy out of the dugout when you're playing catch-up right away. (The pitchers) are aware of it. We're looking at everyone's routine. A couple of guys have really good, consistent routines.''

Willis said the Red Sox have examined everything, from pre-game routines and timing for warm-ups. So far, they haven't been able to discover any common factors.

"We've got to come out and throw better in that first inning,'' said David Price, who will start the series finale against his former team Wednesday afternoon. "It's setting the tone early. It's going out there and putting up a quick zero and giving all your defenders and your offense (the message), 'Alright, we've got it today. We don't have to go out and put up a 10-spot.'

"If we can go out there and put up early zeros, it takes a lot of the pressure off that offense.''

For now, it's something the Sox are focused on repairing.

"Baseball's a crazy game,'' said Willis. "Sometimes you go through periods and it just happens. That's not a good answer and that's not an excuse. We have to be better and they know that.''

 

Trip to minors gives E-Rod opportunity to work on delivery consistency

ap_16157675271845.jpg

Trip to minors gives E-Rod opportunity to work on delivery consistency

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. -- Red Sox pitching coach Carl Willis didn't say that Eduardo Rodriguez was tipping his pitches again Monday.

Then again, he didn't have to.

The results -- nine runs on 11 hits in 2 1/3 innings against the Tampa Bay Rays -- offered a hint. And, just for good measure, Willis all but said so Tuesday afternoon.

"It really goes back to consistency in (his) delivery,'' said Willis, "because with the inconsistencies -- I know it's no secret -- hitters know what's coming. He's worked on it extensively in bullpen sessions, dry work periods. He makes progress, shows the abilities to make those adjustments. However, when the game begins and his focus gears more toward attacking the hitter, the old habits resurface.

"It's not from lack of effort on his part. It's just a bit much to accomplish at the major league level, where hitters can look for inconsistencies and make adjustments more so that in the minors.''

Rodriguez knows what has to be done. But as recent history suggests, it's not an easy fix.

"It takes a lot of work. It does,'' said Willis. "Obviously, he's gone back to his old delivery that he's more accustomed to and comfortable with. I think there's a possibility that we're going to have to make an adjustment with his hands -- where he sets them and keeps them throughout his delivery, maybe eliminate some movement. And that's going to be something that would definitely be difficult to take place here.

"It's not easy, but certainly not impossible. He's a good athlete. He's an intelligent kid. He's aware. But it's the ability to maintain to make it a new habit so he doesn't have to think about it.''

How long Rodriguez takes to correct the flaws is unknown, making it difficult to estimate when he might return to the Red Sox rotation.

"I don't have an exact answer for that,'' said John Farrell. "That's going to be a start-by-start situation and (depends on) how he solidifies the adjustments that are requires. I don't have a timetable for how long it's going to be. . . But to suggest that this is going to be a one-start situation (at Pawtucket) would be a little aggressive.''

 

Did John Farrell mismanage Xander Bogaerts' playing time?

Did John Farrell mismanage Xander Bogaerts' playing time?

Michael Felger, Tony Massarotti, and Jim Murray discuss Xander Bogaerts, who admitted he's tired and is receiving the night off for the Boston Red Sox.