Report: Lucchino playing hardball with Cubs

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Report: Lucchino playing hardball with Cubs

Apparently, the ruptured relationship between Theo Epstein and Larry Lucchino has become a major stumbling block in Epstein's desire to leave the Red Sox for the Cubs.

Our Comcast SportsNetNBC Sports colleague, David Kaplan of CSN Chicago, reported Saturday that "negotiations between the Cubs and the Boston Red Sox have turned increasingly contentious" over compensation for Epstein, and that the Cubs "have dug in their heels" against what the Sox are demanding in return for letting their general manager out of the final year of his Boston contract.

To further complicate matters, Kaplan's sources say Lucchino -- who, as president and CEO, is heading the Red Sox' side of the talks -- "is trying to make it very difficult for Epstein to accept his dream situation in Chicago because of his fractured relationship with his one-time protege".

"The Red Sox hold the cards here because they have their new GM in Ben Cherington and they control Theo for the next 12 months," a baseball executive told Kaplan. "If they want, they can force Theo to stay in Boston or on the sidelines for the next year. Can the Cubs go without a GM for the next 12 months? That would be an incredibly gutsy move but also a very risky one . . .

"Larry Lucchino is one of the most unreasonable people I have ever dealt with and, because of his frayed relationship with Theo Epstein, he is looking to make a point at the expense of Theo's happiness and his desire to go to Chicago. I didn't believe that ownership group for one second when they said that they wouldn't stand in Theo's way if he wanted out of Boston. They are furious that he wants out and they are trying to make a point."

According to earlier reports in various media outlets, the Cubs were looking to compensate the Red Sox with cash while the Sox were looking for prospects. In addition, the Red Sox are attempting to prevent Epstein from taking any of his Boston assistants to Chicago.

McAdam: Prospects of a Papelbon-Red Sox reunion dimming

McAdam: Prospects of a Papelbon-Red Sox reunion dimming

BOSTON -- Until next Wednesday, major league teams can add to their rosters and have the new additions still be eligible for postseason play.

But don't expect the Red Sox to do any serious upgrading.

The bullpen could sorely use some reinforcements, but the difficulty of obtaining help at this time of year -- when players changing teams must first clear waivers -- is problematic.

Asked recently the odds of the Sox making a deal to bolster the team's relief group, an industry source reponded: "Pretty slim.''

The source went on to say that any relievers of value have been routinely "blocked'' -- i.e., claimed by a team before being pulled back by the original club.

The few relievers who have successfully cleared waivers -- including Oakland's Ryan Madson and Chicago's David Robertson -- are those with multiyear commitments that extend beyond this season.

And just because the likes of Madson and Robertson have cleared waivers doesn't guarantee they're necessarily available. At this time of the year, teams routinely send their players through waivers to provide them with flexibilty and to determine the level of interest for deals in the off-season.

In the case of Robertson, the Red Sox would be taking on $25 million in future salary for 2017 and 2018 for a pitcher who would not be serving as their closer. The Sox control Craig Kimbrel for two more seasons, with a guaranteed contract for 2017 and a team option for 2018.

One major-league executive noted that teams are often reluctant to take on a reliever with a multiyear contract, since the existence of a future commitment could restrict a team in terms of usage.

Better to have a player on an expiring deal, the executive suggested, with no worries about future obligations.

It's still possible that the Sox could acquire Jonathan Papelbon, whose case has gone cold in the past week. Only 10 days ago, reports had Papelbon ready to sign within 24 hours with one of the handful of clubs expressing an interest in him.

But since then, Papelbon hasn't been heard from. One source indicated that Papelbon's interest in signing elsewhere may be impacted by a family situation.

Whatever the reason, the longer Papelbon goes without signing somewhere, the tougher it is to imagine him having much impact. 

Papelbon last pitched for the Washington Nationals on Aug. 6, three weeks ago. He would need some time on a minor-league assignment in order to be major league-ready for the final month.

And while Papelbon would enjoy returning to the familiarity of Boston, he's not close to the same pitcher that he was when he left after 2011. Indeed, Papelbon isn't even the same pitcher he was in his final two seasons with the Philadelphia Phillies.

The Red Sox, reduced to matching up night after night in the eighth inning, would still welcome him back. But there are other options to upgrade a porous bullpen, options that would seem to make the odds of a Papebon-Red Sox reunion negligible.