Red Sox still bitter over clubhouse "snitches"

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Red Sox still bitter over clubhouse "snitches"

FORT MYERS, Fla. -- In an interview over the weekend, starting pitcher Josh Beckett claimed there were "snitches'' in the clubhouse, a reference to the fallout from last September and ensuing reports of beer and fried chicken being consumed mid-game in the clubhouse.

On Monday, manager Bobby Valentine said he would take a wait-and-see approach in determining whether it needs to be further addressed.

"Maybe as the group gets smaller,'' said Valentine, "and it seems like it's a situation that is festering and hasn't come to a head (late in March), maybe. I don't know.''

Beckett, in an interview with WEEI.com, said he was still resentful that details were leaked to the media.

"Teams are built on trust and teamwork,'' said Valentine. "Those are probably the two most important things championship teams have. So if there is distrust, I think it eventually would have to be addressed. But in my experience, those things usually present themselves.''

In the first two weeks of camp, a number of players and officials have expressed hope that the club could "turn the page'' on the disastrous finish to 2011, stressing the need for a fresh start for 2012.

"I don't think you turn the page on it,'' said Valentine. "You work through things and time is a great healer. But it's not the only healer. If someone was burned in (the Red Sox clubhouse), it's going to take some time for the sting to leave. And it's probably going to take some actions, too.

"I don't know that they have to be in a meeting form, or caucusing or small groups, big groups. Usually, they present themselves. And when they do, you'll find the true spirit.''

Valentine acknowledged that in conversations with some players, resentment over clubhouse leaks have surfaced.

"Saying 'Forget it,' '' said Valentine, "is like saying, 'Relax.' Those words mean nothing. It takes breathing and confidence and all those wonderful things to relax. It takes time and possibly, at times, apologies. But apologies come with actions to heal. I don't think you can just say, 'OK, we're going to have a meeting. OK, forget it, we're turning the page, it's over.'

"I don't particularly believe that.''

Brady, Harbaugh found common ground on plane ride back from Michigan

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Brady, Harbaugh found common ground on plane ride back from Michigan

FOXBORO -- What could have been an awkward plane ride for Tom Brady and John Harbaugh was made less so thanks to a high school lacrosse player. 

Brady and Harbaugh shared a private plane back from Michigan where Jim Harbaugh and his University of Michigan program put on an event for National Signing Day. About a year earlier, Brady told a room full of reporters that Harbaugh and his coaching staff should study the rule book and "figure it out" after hearing that they were pretty upset about the unusual formations the Patriots ran during their AFC Divisional Round win over Baltimore. 

They may not have been on the best of terms.

"I was pissed off," he told ESPN's Ian O'Connor before the start of this season. "It was uncalled for. And the rules are deeper than that, and I know the rules, and I stand by why that play shouldn't have been allowed. ... So yeah, that should never have been said."

But on the flight was Harbaugh's daughter Alison, a high school lacrosse player. When Brady took some time to share a few thoughts on competitiveness with her, he and Harbaugh found common ground.

"We had a lot of fun," Harbaugh said of the flight. "I don't know if he's talked about that at all, but we ended up sharing a plane ride along with my daughter and a couple of his people, friends of his. We just had a chance to just talk for a couple hours. And really more than anything, Alison got a chance to listen to Tom Brady talk about competing and what it takes to be great at what you do.

"And one of the funny things about it was, he was so nice to her. He gets off and they go, and we get back on the plane and we're talking, and she says something like, 'Boy, Tom really is a nice guy.' And I look at here and go, 'Tom?' I'm thinking 'Mr. Brady' would have been more appropriate. She said, 'He said to call me Tom.' I got a kick out of that.

"It was good. Lot of respect for him and a lot of respect for what he's accomplished. He's very tough to compete against. The best quarterback that's played, certainly in this era, without question in my mind. That's how I would rank him. And it's just another tough challenge to have to play against him."

Lowry, Sullinger and Blount interrupt interview with DeRozan

Lowry, Sullinger and Blount interrupt interview with DeRozan

DeMar DeRozan didn't get a chance to answer one question in his postgame interview before being interrupted by Kyle Lowry, Jared Sullinger, and LeGarrette Blount.