Red Sox still bitter over clubhouse "snitches"

Red Sox still bitter over clubhouse "snitches"
February 27, 2012, 8:52 pm
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FORT MYERS, Fla. -- In an interview over the weekend, starting pitcher Josh Beckett claimed there were "snitches'' in the clubhouse, a reference to the fallout from last September and ensuing reports of beer and fried chicken being consumed mid-game in the clubhouse.

On Monday, manager Bobby Valentine said he would take a wait-and-see approach in determining whether it needs to be further addressed.

"Maybe as the group gets smaller,'' said Valentine, "and it seems like it's a situation that is festering and hasn't come to a head (late in March), maybe. I don't know.''

Beckett, in an interview with WEEI.com, said he was still resentful that details were leaked to the media.

"Teams are built on trust and teamwork,'' said Valentine. "Those are probably the two most important things championship teams have. So if there is distrust, I think it eventually would have to be addressed. But in my experience, those things usually present themselves.''

In the first two weeks of camp, a number of players and officials have expressed hope that the club could "turn the page'' on the disastrous finish to 2011, stressing the need for a fresh start for 2012.

"I don't think you turn the page on it,'' said Valentine. "You work through things and time is a great healer. But it's not the only healer. If someone was burned in (the Red Sox clubhouse), it's going to take some time for the sting to leave. And it's probably going to take some actions, too.

"I don't know that they have to be in a meeting form, or caucusing or small groups, big groups. Usually, they present themselves. And when they do, you'll find the true spirit.''

Valentine acknowledged that in conversations with some players, resentment over clubhouse leaks have surfaced.

"Saying 'Forget it,' '' said Valentine, "is like saying, 'Relax.' Those words mean nothing. It takes breathing and confidence and all those wonderful things to relax. It takes time and possibly, at times, apologies. But apologies come with actions to heal. I don't think you can just say, 'OK, we're going to have a meeting. OK, forget it, we're turning the page, it's over.'

"I don't particularly believe that.''