Red Sox see improvement with Miller's mechanics

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Red Sox see improvement with Miller's mechanics

FORT MYERS, Fla. -- It was only one outing in the first official Grapefruit League game, but the Red Sox had reason to be encouraged by Andrew Miller Saturday.

The lefty pitcher, who's had difficulty repeating his delivery and establishing consistent command, pitched two innings in the Red Sox' 8-3 win over the Minnesota Twins and didn't allow a hit while striking out three and walking one.

Miller has been working with pitching coach Bob McClure this spring on trying to simplify his mechanics. Sunday, the lesson seemed to take.

He walked the first hitter he faced -- the No. 9 hitter in Minnesota's lineup -- but then retired the next six straight. That quick rebound caught the attention of Bobby Valentine.

"He didn't let it all get it away from him (after the leadoff walk)," said Valentine. "He made an adjustment out of the stretch to the next hitter and seemed to be in the driver's seat."

McClure had Miller look at video early in camp and Valentine has stressed the importance of having just one voice work on the pitcher's mechanics.

"A lot of people had been tinkering (with him)," said Valentine. "Bob's done a very good getting a consensus, which we got from the very first day we looked at it and then staying with it."

Along the way, Miller fell into the bad habit of throwing across his body, which is not only bad mechanics, but potentially harmful to a pitcher's health.

"Now, he's in a comfortable place (in terms of his delivery)," said Valentine.

McClure has been stressing the importance of Miller getting back the style of pitching that worked for him at the University of North Carolina.

"Obviously, he was pretty good in college," said McClure, "and not too mechanical. It was more about competing. We've been trying to keep it simple instead of trying to change a couple of things. Whatever he's able to do well, just do that instead of trying to do too many things. Hopefully, that (approach) clears him and his thought process and just keeping it simple."

Miller is on his third pro organization (Florida and Detroit before coming to the Sox), and has had a handful of different pitching coaches, including two in two years with the Red Sox and may have suffered from information overload.

"To his credit," said McClure, "he's tried to get better by doing different things, which sometimes can hurt because the ability to sift the information that works you and (get rid) of the rest that doesn't is important. Your sift mechanism has to work.

"The best pitchers are the ones committed to doing whatever they do well. They listen to other things but they'll use what works for them and try it, and the stuff that doesn't, they just get rid of it. What happens is, you get lost and if you listen too much and try to do everything, pretty soon, you forget what you did well. I think that might have happened. So we're just trying to get back (to basics)."

For all the video work and analysis of Miller's mechanics, McClure is coming to the realization that, with Miller, less is more.

"Maybe," said McClure, "he just needs to be let alone and do his thing without having any stuff in his head. We'll see."

Source: ‘Fairly certain’ Bruins will part ways with Connolly

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Source: ‘Fairly certain’ Bruins will part ways with Connolly

Things didn’t look good for right winger Brett Connolly returning to the Bruins after they opted not to tender him a qualifying offer a couple of days ago. Now it appears the former No. 6 overall pick will be headed toward unrestricted free agency. 

A league source told CSNNE.com on Friday morning that “it was fairly certain” Connolly wouldn’t be re-signing with Boston leading up to July 1 and that the right wing would be getting a fresh start someplace else next season. 

The B’s had maintained some level of public interest in keeping Connolly, 24, after relinquishing his RFA rights, but there hasn’t been much in the way of substantive communication between the two sides over the last few days.

Connolly scored nine goals and 25 points with a minus-1 in 71 games for the Black and Gold last season in a disappointing offensive season playing on a line with Patrice Bergeron and Brad Marchand. 

He went long stretches without scoring goals or posting points last season and never played like the 6-foot-2, 193-pound power forward-type he was projected to be coming out of junior hockey. 

It was a step back from a decent season as a Tampa Bay Lightning third liner in 2014-15, and a clear bummer after they’d shipped a pair of second round picks to the Bolts in exchange for the former lottery pick.

With Connolly now headed for free agency with zero assets coming back to the Bruins in exchange for him, chalk this up as another total loss for the Bruins at a trade deadline where they’ve really damaged their long term organizational prospects over the past couple of years. 

 

Bruins sign David Backes after losing Eriksson to Vancouver

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Bruins sign David Backes after losing Eriksson to Vancouver

It apparently hasn't taken long for the Bruins to replace Loui Eriksson.

Moments after word trickled out that Ericksson signed with the Canucks for a deal believed to be worth $36 million over six years, Bob McKenzie of TSN reported the Bruins signed ex-Blue center David Backes to a five-year contract. In addition, McKenzie also reported that Boston has re-signed defenseman John-Michael Liles.

More to come . . .