Red Sox see improvement with Miller's mechanics

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Red Sox see improvement with Miller's mechanics

FORT MYERS, Fla. -- It was only one outing in the first official Grapefruit League game, but the Red Sox had reason to be encouraged by Andrew Miller Saturday.

The lefty pitcher, who's had difficulty repeating his delivery and establishing consistent command, pitched two innings in the Red Sox' 8-3 win over the Minnesota Twins and didn't allow a hit while striking out three and walking one.

Miller has been working with pitching coach Bob McClure this spring on trying to simplify his mechanics. Sunday, the lesson seemed to take.

He walked the first hitter he faced -- the No. 9 hitter in Minnesota's lineup -- but then retired the next six straight. That quick rebound caught the attention of Bobby Valentine.

"He didn't let it all get it away from him (after the leadoff walk)," said Valentine. "He made an adjustment out of the stretch to the next hitter and seemed to be in the driver's seat."

McClure had Miller look at video early in camp and Valentine has stressed the importance of having just one voice work on the pitcher's mechanics.

"A lot of people had been tinkering (with him)," said Valentine. "Bob's done a very good getting a consensus, which we got from the very first day we looked at it and then staying with it."

Along the way, Miller fell into the bad habit of throwing across his body, which is not only bad mechanics, but potentially harmful to a pitcher's health.

"Now, he's in a comfortable place (in terms of his delivery)," said Valentine.

McClure has been stressing the importance of Miller getting back the style of pitching that worked for him at the University of North Carolina.

"Obviously, he was pretty good in college," said McClure, "and not too mechanical. It was more about competing. We've been trying to keep it simple instead of trying to change a couple of things. Whatever he's able to do well, just do that instead of trying to do too many things. Hopefully, that (approach) clears him and his thought process and just keeping it simple."

Miller is on his third pro organization (Florida and Detroit before coming to the Sox), and has had a handful of different pitching coaches, including two in two years with the Red Sox and may have suffered from information overload.

"To his credit," said McClure, "he's tried to get better by doing different things, which sometimes can hurt because the ability to sift the information that works you and (get rid) of the rest that doesn't is important. Your sift mechanism has to work.

"The best pitchers are the ones committed to doing whatever they do well. They listen to other things but they'll use what works for them and try it, and the stuff that doesn't, they just get rid of it. What happens is, you get lost and if you listen too much and try to do everything, pretty soon, you forget what you did well. I think that might have happened. So we're just trying to get back (to basics)."

For all the video work and analysis of Miller's mechanics, McClure is coming to the realization that, with Miller, less is more.

"Maybe," said McClure, "he just needs to be let alone and do his thing without having any stuff in his head. We'll see."

Patriots WR Julian Edelman facing paternity suit from Swedish model

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Patriots WR Julian Edelman facing paternity suit from Swedish model

Swedish model Ella Rose filed a paternity suit in L.A. County Superior Court against New England Patriots wide receiver Julian Edelman, according to TMZ, claiming that Edelman is the father of her unborn child.

Rose and Edelman previously had a casual relationship for about two years, and, according to the Boston Globe, she is due to give birth to a girl in October.

Edelman also now reportedly acknowledges that he is the father after initially contesting paternity.

McAdam: Poor homestand puts Red Sox on tough road

McAdam: Poor homestand puts Red Sox on tough road

The Red Sox had their chance.

They could have beefed up during the just-completed homestand and taken advantage of the worst team in the American League (Minnesota) and another that was only three games over .500 when it came to town (Detroit).

Instead, the Red Sox were just 2-5 in the last seven games at Fenway, losing ground in the standings to the Orioles and Blue Jays rather than making the race tighter.

That's not to suggest the Red Sox played their way out of contention in the last week. There are better than two months remaining in the season and the schedule isn't yet two-thirds complete.

Moreover, there is no dominant team in the East, and, thus, no one capable of pulling away and leaving the rest of the teams in their wake.

Baltimore and Toronto are flawed, too, as the first 100 or so games of the season have demonstrated.

But what the disappointing homestand means is this: Because they didn't win as much as they should at Fenway in the last week, the Sox will have to make up for that on the road.

As has been talked about ad nauseum in the last week, the schedule is about to become more demanding for the Red Sox. It's bad enough that they're in the middle of a stretch that will see them enjoy one (1) day off in the span of 44 days. Making matters worse is that 41 of the final 63 games are away from home -- including the next 11.

Put another way: The Red Sox have not yet had a three-city road trip this season, but all four of their remaining trips are of the three-city variety, including two that include travel to the West Coast.

The Red Sox have played fairly well on the road (21-19) -- they're one of just four teams in the American League with a winning road record -- but the simple fact remains: It's harder to win on the road than it is at home. And that's before you take into consideration the toll that lengthy road trips can take.

Of the next three road opponents, one has a losing record, and another is just two games over .500. Only the Los Angeles Dodgers, next weekend's interleauge road opponent, are playoff contenders from among that group.

Then again, the Red Sox thought they could roll over the Twins last weekend and came away with a four-game split, so it's difficult to handicap these things.

It should help, too, that the Red Sox are getting healthier.

Junichi Tazawa returned this week, and Craig Kimbrel could be back as early as Monday in Seattle. Chris Young and Josh Rutledge could rejoin them before they head out on their next road swing in mid-August.

With all the talk of the daunting schedule and demanding travel ahead, Dustin Pedroia was having none of it.

"We can play just as well on the road as we have at home,'' said Pedroia. "That stuff (the schedule) is irrelevant.''

Maybe. But one way or another, we're about to find out.

Garoppolo: Make the best of this opportunity as starting quarterback

Garoppolo: Make the best of this opportunity as starting quarterback

Jimmy Garoppolo, who will start the first four weeks, talks to the media today about trying to take advantage of the opportunity of being the Patriots' quarterback.