Rays shell Lester, 7-4

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Rays shell Lester, 7-4

BOSTON With three home runs including a Matt Joyce third-inning grand slam the Rays knocked Jon Lester from the game after just four innings.

The Rays took the first game in the three-game series, 7-4.

In his previous nine starts, he had given up just four home runs total. The three homers tied a career high, for the third time (along with April 1, 2011 at Texas and June 18, 2011, against Milwaukee) for the most home runs Lester has given up in a game.

Lester had a crisp 1-2-3 first inning to start the game, and Kevin Youkilis RBI single in the bottom of the frame gave him a brief lead. But, he gave up three walks one more than his past three starts, spanning 20 innings, combined. His ERA climbed from 3.95 to 4.72.

Lester has had just one shorter outing this season, April 17 against the Rangers in his third start of the year when he lasted just two innings. Other than that outing and Fridays, he had averaged just over 6 23 innings per start.

The Rays added back-to-back home runs in the fourth a two-run shot by No. 9 hitter Elliot Johnson and a solo shot by Carlos Pena, who leads all batters with six home runs off Lester.

The grand slam was the second Lester has allowed in his career, along with one by Paul Konerko in the fourth inning on Sept. 30, 2010, in Chicago.

Meanwhile, Rays right-hander Alex Cobb, making just his 11th big league start, held the Sox to two runs on three hits over the first five innings.

The Sox added a run in the fifth when Scott Podsednik singled, stole second, and scored on Adrian Gonzalez's double off the wall in left field.

They got two more in the sixth when the Rays sent three relievers to the mound. J.P Howell walked Jarrod Saltalamacchia and Daniel Nava, the only two batters he faced, to lead off the inning. Saltalamacchia scored on Marlon Byrds single to center off Burke Badenhop and Nava scored on Mike Aviles sacrifice fly. Badenhop was done after he hit Dustin Pedroia with a pitch. Left-hander Jake McGee ended the Sox threat by retiring David Ortiz on a flyout to right.

But, that was all the damage the Sox could do.

The benches emptied when Sox lefty Franklin Morales hit Luke Scott with a pitch with two on and no outs in the ninth. Morales also hit Will Rhymes with a pitch last week in Tampa Bay. Rays lefty Matt Moore hit Adrian Gonzalez last week in the first game of the two-game series. It was a day after Gonzalez had said he would hit a home run in the game. Moore hit Gonzalez with the first pitch of his first at-bat. Dustin Pedroia was also hit Friday night, in the sixth inning by Burke Badenhop.

Scott's taste of big-league life with Red Sox has him hungering for more

Scott's taste of big-league life with Red Sox has him hungering for more

CHESNUT HILL -- The Red Sox Rookie Development Program is designed to help young players prepare for what playing at the major-league level is like,. That can be valuable for a prospect like Rafael Devers, who hasn’t even made it to Double-A.

But of the eight-man cast at the workout this year, there’s one guy who actually has major-league experience.

Robby Scott joined the Red Sox as a September call-up last season and turned some heads, holding opponents scoreless over six innings of work.

Now the lefty is back working with younger guys to prepare himself for spring training -- something he’s itching to get started.

“It’s one thing that we always talk about,” the left-handed reliever told CSNNE.com “It’s a tough road to get there, but it’s an even tougher and harder road to stay there. And having that taste in September last year was incredible to be a part of it.”

That taste Scott had last fall has only made the desire to rejoin Boston greater.

“Yeah, because now you know what it’s like,” Scott said CSNNE.com. “You see it and you’re there and you’re a part of it. And it’s like, ‘Man, I wanna be there.’ You’re a little bit more hungry.”

And his hunger to pitch with the Red Sox only becomes greater at an event like this where he’s the only one with MLB time.

“They ask on a consistent basis,” Scott started, “ ‘What’s it like?’ ‘What was it like getting there the first day?’ ‘How did the guys react?’ ‘What was it like dealing with the media?’

“That’s what this program is here for, just to kind of gives these guys a little taste of what it is like and get familiar with the circumstances.

While the experience and constant discussion invites players to try to do more in the offseason or change their routine, the 27-year-old has stayed the course, trusting what’s gotten him there.

“The offseason training stays the same, nothing really changes on that side of things,” Scott said. “Nothing changes. Go about my business the way I have the last six, seven years.”

Red Sox prospect Sam Travis 'not at all' worried about knee

Red Sox prospect Sam Travis 'not at all' worried about knee

CHESNUT HILL -- Kyle Schwarber made his triumphant return to the Cubs lineup in the 2016 World Series after missing the regular season with a torn ACL. Only months after the Cubs outfielder tore his ACL, Schwarber’s teammate from Indiana University -- and Red Sox prospect -- Sam Travis suffered the very same injury, missing the end of 2016.

“I actually talked to [Schwarber] quite a bit,” Travis said following the group training session. “He was one step ahead of me at all times . . . He gave me the lowdown, told me that it was like.

“With this kind of injury and the activity we do on a daily basis, it’s going to be something you take care of the rest of your life. Whether it’s treatment or the training room, you’re going to get to 100 percent. But you’re still going to have to take care of it."

Now the first baseman is back on his feet and was even healthy enough to join his teammates in lateral movement drills at the Red Sox rookie development program at Boston College.

If you didn’t know any better while watching him, you’d think the injury never happened. And that’s how Travis is approaching it.

“Not at all [worried about it],” Travis told CSNNE.com. “It’s one of those things you kind of pretend it’s just like your normal knee. You don’t do anything different because that may injury something else. You don’t want to try to prevent something from happening because you my pull your hip or something like that.

“You’ve just gotta go about it and trust yourself.”

That’s a great sign for Travis in his climb to joining the big league club. Getting over the physical portion of an injury takes time, but there’s usually a proven system set in place.

The mental side is another animal entirely and varies from player to player.

Luckily for the Red Sox, Travis doesn’t overthink much of anything.

“Nah, I’m a pretty simple guy,” he said.