New MLB system will bring Sox, Ortiz to the table soon

692754.jpg

New MLB system will bring Sox, Ortiz to the table soon

If it's the off-season, it must be time for some David Ortiz contractual drama.

For the third October running, the Red Sox have a decision to make on their designated hitter.

In 2010, they had to decide whether to pick up a 12.5 million option. (They did.)

Last fall, Ortiz was a free agent, but the Red Sox offered him salary arbitration, and in December, Ortiz accepted, effectively binding him to the club. Minutes before a January arbitration hearing, the two sides essentially split the difference on their filing numbers and agreed on a one-year, 14.575 deal.

Now, it's decision time again. But there are some important differences.

Thanks to a change in the collective bargaining agreement -- signed last November, but not implemented right away -- clubs are no longer allowed to offer arbitration to their own free agents.

Instead, under a new system that more closely resembles the NHL's, teams are permitted to offer their own free agents "qualifying offers." Major League Baseball takes the average of the top 20 percent of players in the game and establishes that as the qualifying offer standard -- one salary fits all.

For this year, the first under the new CBA, that figure will fall somewhere between 13.3-13.4 million.

The problem there is that represents a paycut of more than 1 million for Ortiz, virtually guaranteeing that he would reject such an offer and seek free agency.

Qualifying offers must be made within five days of the conclusion of the World Series. Players then have five days to accept or decline.

Given the likelihood that Ortiz would reject the offer, a sense of urgency has been injected into the negotiations. It would behoove the Sox to get Ortiz signed to a contract before the end of the World Series.

A baseball source indicated the Sox, who had some preliminary talks with Ortiz during the season, will begin talks in earnest within the next week.

Once those discussions begin, another hurdle could develop: Ortiz has made it clear that he wants a multi-year deal as a reward for his production. It rankles the veteran slugger that the Sox have doled out multi-year deals - some as long as seven years -- to players outside the organization, but have been unwilling, over the last two off-seasons, to commit to more than one to him.

Ortiz has a point, of course. And though he missed nearly the entire second half with an Achilles heel injury, his 2012 season -- what there was of it -- was superb. His .611 slugging percentage was his highest since 2007 and his OPS (on-base percentage plus slugging) of 1.026 was the third-best in his career.

But there are counterpoints, too.

For one thing, Ortiz will turn 37 next month. And as the Achilles heel injury reminded everyone, he's more susceptible to injury, including ones that could be career-threatening.

Moreover, there's the issue of the marketplace. As a DH, Ortiz has little or no value to the 15 National League teams. And of the remaining 14 American League teams (with Houston switching leagues this winter), some are already committed to veteran DHs (Chicago, for example, has two years remaining with Adam Dunn) while others, like the Yankees, prefer to rotate position players in the DH role to provide occasional rest.

Ortiz has said he would like to finish his career with the Red Sox, and ownership has long had a soft spot for Ortiz. What makes the most sense is a one-year deal at a slight raise (say, 15 million or so), with a vesting option at the same figure based on plate appearances. (Teams are forbidden from tying vesting options to actual statistical figures like home runs, RBI, etc).

But if a deal like that is going to be reached, it probably has to happen in the next three weeks. Once it comes to time to make a qualifying offer -- which the Sox would need to do to guarantee they would get draft pick compensation in the event Ortiz signed elsewhere -- the leverage shifts to Ortiz.

Sunday's Red Sox-Rays lineups: JBJ sits, Vazquez catches

red_sox_jackie_bradley_060816.jpg

Sunday's Red Sox-Rays lineups: JBJ sits, Vazquez catches

Jackie Bradley Jr. gets the day off and Christian Vazquez get the start at catcher as the Red Sox look to extend their winning streak to 11 games today against the Tampa Bay Rays in St. Petersburg. 

Andrew Benintendi replaces Bradley in center, Chris Young is in left and left-hander Eduardo Rodriguez (3-7, 4.84 ERA) is on the mound as the Red Sox close in on the A.L. East title. Their magic number to clinch the division is three with seven games left. 

Right-hander Jake Odorizzi (9-6, 3.73) is on the mound for the Rays.

The lineups:  

RED SOX 
Dustin Pedroia 2B
Xander Bogaerts SS
David Ortiz DH
Mookie Betts RF
Hanley Ramirez LF
Travis Shaw 3B
Chris Young LF
Andrew Benintendi CF
Christian Vazquez C
---
Eduardo Rodriguez LHP 

RAYS
Logan Forsythe 2B
Kevin Kiermaier CF
Evan Longoria 3B
Brad Miller SS
Mikey Mahtook RF
Corey Dickerson LF
Curt Casali DH
Luke Maile C
Richie Shaffer 1B
---
Jake Odorizzi RHP 
 

Marlins pitcher Jose Fernandez, 24, killed in boating accident

miami-marlins-jose-fernandez.jpg

Marlins pitcher Jose Fernandez, 24, killed in boating accident

MIAMI  — Jose Fernandez, the ace right-hander for the Miami Marlins who escaped Cuba to become one of baseball's brightest stars, was killed in a boating accident early Sunday morning. Fernandez was 24.

Authorities said Fernandez was one of three people killed in a boat crash off Miami Beach.

Chief Petty Officer Nyxolyno Cangemi told The Associated Press that a Coast Guard patrol boat spotted an overturned boat at 3:30 a.m. on a jetty near Government Cut. The bodies were discovered a short time later.

In the statement, the Marlins say they are "devastated by the tragic loss of José Fernández. Our thoughts and prayers are with his family at this very difficult time."

"Hands down one of my favorite guys to watch pitch! He brought nothing but intensity and passion," Red Sox pitcher David Price said on Twitter early Sunday.

Because the boat was on a jetty, the Coast Guard notified Miami-Dade police, which turned the investigation over to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.

Fernandez was on a 32-foot vessel that had a "severe impact" with a jetty, said FWC's Lorenzo Veloz.

"We are stunned and devastated," Major League Baseball said in a statement.

City of Miami Fire-Rescue workers were seen carrying bodies, draped and on stretchers, at the Coast Guard station after sunrise Sunday. The names of the other two individuals are being withheld pending notification of relatives, the Coast Guard said.

Fernandez was a two-time All-Star who went 38-17 in his four seasons with the Marlins, winning the NL's Rookie of the Year award in 2013. The native of Santa Clara, Cuba became a U.S. citizen last year and was enormously popular in Miami.

He tried to defect from Cuba at least three times — landing in jail after one of those unsuccessful tries — before eventually getting to the U.S. and going to high school in Tampa, Florida. The Marlins drafted him in 2011 and Fernandez was in the majors two years later.

The Marlins' game Sunday at home against the Atlanta Braves has been cancelled.

"I'm still in shock," former Marlins player Gaby Sanchez said on Twitter. "The world has lost a remarkable person. You will be missed and my heart goes out to the Fernandez family."

© 2016 Associated Press.