Mullen on the Minors: LHP Hernandez gets call to PawSox

827231.jpg

Mullen on the Minors: LHP Hernandez gets call to PawSox

Its highly unlikely any team will keep its Opening Day rotation intact throughout the season. But, consider the case of Triple-A Pawtucket. Pitching coach Rich Sauveur had a six-man Opening Day rotation of Alex Wilson, Russ Ohlendorf, Justin Germano, Aaron Cook, Doug Mathis, and Brandon Duckworth. Today, not one of them is a starting pitcher for Pawtucket. Wilson is working in the PawSox bullpen. Ohlendorf, Germano, and Cook are pitching in the major leagues. And Mathis and Duckworth recently left the organization to pitch in Japan.

Ohlendorf is 3-0 with a 5.16 ERA in eight games (four starts) for the Padres. Germano, currently with the Cubs, is a combined 0-1with a 1.04 ERA in two games for Chicago and Boston. Cook is 2-3 with a 3.50 ERA in six starts for the Sox. In five starts since coming off the disabled list on June 24, Cook has a 2.16 ERA.

Meanwhile, the PawSox are among the International League leaders in ERA, at 3.55, saves (32), WHIP (1.33), strikeouts (799), and holds (43).

The PawSox currently have a rotation that includes Tony Pena, Jr., Billy Buckner, Zach Stewart, and newcomers Nelson Figueroa and Chris Hernandez.

The left-handed Hernandez is the first member of the 2010 Sox draft class to be promoted to Triple-A, despite garnering perhaps fewer headlines than other members of that class such as right-hander Anthony Ranaudo, third baseman Kolbrin Vitek, the Sox first pick that year, and outfielder Bryce Brentz.

In 18 starts, spanning 103 23 innings, with Portland, Hernandez was 4-8 with a 3.13 ERA, 60 strikeouts and 36 walks, for a 5.2 strikeouts-per-nine innings ratio, and 1.67 strikeouts-to-walks ratio.

Chris has been about as consistent the last few years as anybody we have, said Red Sox director of player development Ben Crockett. Really aggressive strike thrower with a really good ability to keep the ball off the barrel of the bat. So his consistency and overall performance merited getting an opportunity at Triple-A.

Hernandez was the Sox ninth pick in 2010, out the University of Miami, where he went 10-3 with a 2.64 ERA and 110 strikeouts in 19 games (18 starts). Last season, with High-A Salem, he was 10-7 with a 3.18 ERA in his first full professional season.

We did have a feel that he was pretty advanced, coming from a big program where hed had a lot of success, Crockett said. Then he came in last season and really impressed in spring training. So, certainly were not surprised with the amount of success hes had so far. I think hes done a really nice job maintaining that consistency, both at higher levels as hes progressed as well as through the length of the season.

Hernandez made his first start for Pawtucket Sunday, going six innings, giving up two runs on seven hits and two walks with a home run and four strikeouts. He took a no-decision as the PawSox scored a run in the ninth and six in the 12th for the win.

He doesnt throw hard, but he uses his cutter, really relies on his cutter a lot, Sauveur said. He kept the ball down and when he left it up he got hit. But he did a good job. I was happy.

He knows how to pitch, because he doesnt have the greatest stuff. He kind of reminds me of me. I didnt have good stuff but I knew how to pitch and I was able to do it for 18 years. Hes very good. I was very, very pleased with him.

Hernandez is not going to overwhelm anyone with his velocity. His fastball rarely touches 90. His command will be key, said one scout. But the left-hander can impress with his ability to pitch.

He doesnt throw the ball straight, said the scout. He cuts the ball, and sinks it a little bit. He cuts it almost as hard as his regular fastball so its a good complimentary pitch. But, its always going to be about command. Whether he has great command, the jurys still out. But, hes got pretty good command. The way he pitches, his stuff is very complimentary. He changes speeds.

His command is pretty good. He mixes it up pretty good. But when he gets into a jam, he doesnt really have a go-to pitch. Hes going to try to throw a cutter on your hands but if he misses a little bit in the big leagues, boom.

I think hes a rotation guy, or maybe a swing guy. If hes on a staff with a bunch of guys that throw real hard, hes just so different, it could help them. But I think hes a long man, swing guy, fifth starter.

For now, Hernandez is a starter, Crockett said. As with all minor league pitchers, where his big league future might be will depend on the needs of the big league club.

Hernandez is scheduled to make his next start Friday, in the finale of the Pawtuckets four-game series in Indianapolis.

Former Red Sox prospect Andy Marte killed in car crash in Dominican Republic

cleveland-indians-andy-marte-killed-12217.jpg

Former Red Sox prospect Andy Marte killed in car crash in Dominican Republic

Former major leaguer Andy Marte, a one-time top prospect in the Red Sox organization, was killed in a car crash in the Dominican Republic on Sunday. He was 33.

Marte was killed the same day that Royals pitcher Yordano Ventura died in a separate car crash in the Dominican. Ventura was 25. Coincidentally, Ventura was the Royals starting pitcher in Marte's final major league game, for the Arizona Diamondbacks on Aug. 6, 2014.

Marte, drafted by the Braves in 2000, was ranked the No. 9 prospect in baseball in 2005 when the third baseman was traded to the Red Sox as part of the deal that sent shortstop Edgar Renteria to Atlanta and Marte became the top-ranked prospect in the Red Sox organization.  

Marte was traded by the Red Sox to the Indians in 2006 in the deal that sent Coco Crisp to Boston and spent five seasons with Cleveland. His best season was 2009 (.232, six home runs, 25 RBI in 47 games). After a six-game stint with Arizona in 2014, he played in South Korea the past two years.  

Metropolitan traffic authorities in the Dominican told the Associated Press that Marte died when a car he was driving his a house along the highway between San Francisco de Macoris and Pimentel, about 95 miles (150 kilometers) north of the capital.
 

Royals pitcher Yordano Ventura killed in car crash in Dominican Republic

kansas-city-royals-yordano-ventura-killed-12217.jpg

Royals pitcher Yordano Ventura killed in car crash in Dominican Republic

Kansas City Royals pitcher Yordano Ventura was killed in a car crash in in the Dominican Republic on Sunday morning, according to multiple reports. Ventura was 25 years old.

Highway patrol spokesman Jacobo Mateo told the Associated Press that Ventura died on a highway leading to the town of Juan Adrian, about 40 miles (70 kilometers) northwest of Santo Domingo. He says it's not clear if Ventura was driving.

Ventura was killed the same day former major leaguer Andy Marte died in a separate car crash in the Dominican. Coincidentally, Ventura was the starting pitcher in Marte's final MLB game, for the Arizona Diamondbacks on Aug. 6, 2014. 

Ventura was 13-8 with a 4.08 ERA for the Royals' 2015 World Series champions and 11-12 with a 4.45 ERA in 32 starts in 2016. The right-hander made his major league debut in 2013 and in 2014 went 14-10 with a 3.20 ERA for Kansas City's A.L. pennant winners. 

Ironically, Ventura paid tribute to his good friend and fellow Dominican, Oscar Tavares, who was also killed in a car crash in the D.R. in October 2014, by wearing Tavares' initials and R.I.P. on his cap before Ventura's start in Game 6 of the World Series in 2014. 

Ventura is the second current major league player to die in the past five months. Former Miami Marlins ace Jose Fernandez was killed in a boating accident in Miami on Sept. 25.