McAdam: Youkilis defined by sweat he gave

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McAdam: Youkilis defined by sweat he gave

For many, the lasting image of Kevin Youkilis in a Red Sox uniform will be one of his sweating profusely, almost comically so.

And, in a way, that's entirely fitting. Physiological issues aside, Youkilis's extreme perspiration stood for something: the hard work it required for the infielder to become the player he was.

It's easy to think that any player who reaches the major leagues as supremely talented -- better, faster and stronger than the others who failed to reach the game's highest level. And, of course, major leaguers are blessed with a certain innate ability. They possess quickness, flexibility, and hand-eye coordination that most of us can only dream about.

But within the pool of professional players, only a fraction are good enough to get to the majors. Moreover, only the best of the best are capable of nine-year (and counting) playing careers.

For many, their first introduction to Youkilis was Oakland A's general manager Billy Beane's obsession with him in Michael Lewis's best-seller, Moneyball. Beane infamously dubbed Youkilis "the Greek god of walks,'' for Youkilis's ability to get on base.

The nickname rankled Youkilis, who was neither Greek, nor happy about being defined cheifly for his ability to get bases on balls. Years later, Terry Francona playfully ribbed Youkilis about the nickname, observing: "I've seen him in the shower -- he's not the Greek god of anything.''

But Youkilis made himself much more than an on-base machine. In addition to his stellar .388 on-base percentage, Youkilis learned to drive the ball, and in the process, he became a slugger and run produer. From 2008 through 2010, Youkilis posted a slugging percentage of .548 or better and averaged 97 RBI, transforming himself from a player who managed to get on base to one who could do real damage in the middle of a powerful Red Sox lineup.

That transformation came from rigorous off-season work at Athlete's Performance Institute in Arizona and countless swings in the cage -- his feet positioned unnaturally close, his bat wiggling impatiently.

It came, in other words, from hard work.

An hour after he traded him to the Chicago White Sox Sunday Red Sox general manager Ben Cherington chose to remember Youkilis Sunday as someone who was transformed from "a good player to an All-Star through sheer force of will and hard work,'' and that's as good a description of Youkilis as could be imagined.

Even Bobby Valentine, whose public zinging of Youkilis created a firestorm in the first 10 days of the season, saluted Youklilis, praising "his work ethic, his dedication, (and) his ability on the field. He never came off the field with a clean uniform and he always gave everything he had.''

That applies to the defensive side of the game, too. Drafted and developed as a third baseman, Youkilis improved himself in the field, and after becoming a plus defender, moved across the diamond in 2006 when the Sox obtained veteran third baseman Mike Lowell. Youkilis took to first like a natural and earned a Gold Glove while setting an American League record for most consecutive chances at first base without an error.

Then, when the Sox traded for Adrian Gonzalez a year ago, Youkilis again returned to third.

His departure leaves David Ortiz as the lone player who was part of the 2004 championship team, and as Nick Punto, perhaps Youkilis's best friend on the team noted Sunday, Youkilis is one of a handful of people who can say he was a two-time World Series winner with the Red Sox.

"We did a lot of winning during (Youkilis's) time,'' said Cherington. "On an individual level, I think his legacy is (that of) a passionate player who played every inning hard. He did a lot of good things for this organization for the bulk of the time here, really embodied a lot of things that we really believe in.''

Starting with good, old-fashioned hard work, represented by the beads of sweat that not only covered him at times, but came to embody him, too.

After ‘tough month,’ Farrell understands speculation on his job status

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After ‘tough month,’ Farrell understands speculation on his job status

BOSTON - With the Red Sox reeling coming off a month in which they went 10-16 and dropped a handful of games in the standings, speculation has recently focused on John Farrell's job security.

Dave Dombrowski, the Red Sox' president of baseball operations, told reporters Thursday that Farrell's job status was not a focus and that the entire organization had to perform better. Dombrowski added that it's seldom that one person is responsible for a downturn in play.

"We've come off a tough month and finished a disappointing trip through Texas and Tampa,'' acknowledged Farrell when asked about the chatter regarding his job status. "I can understand the question and the potential speculation that's out there. But our expectation is to win and that doesn't change. The focus daily is that, is to go out and put together an effort to win.      

"My communication with Dave is very consistent. I think he's confident in my focus  and that's to win each and every day. That's where we stand. We're looking forward to  the opportunity to start this final homestand before the [All Star] break, so that gets underway tonight.''

Farrell was also asked about the dichotmy that existed between his own evaluation of David Price's outing Wednesday and Price's own estimation. 

Farrell said post-game that he believed Price "probably had his best stuff of the season, in terms of velocity and in terms of the shape of his secondary pitches.''

Price, who was in full self-flagellation mode, offered a slightly contradictory assessment.

"Changeup, that's probably the worst changeup I've had in a month,'' he said. "Curveball was awful. Can't get my cutter or my slider where I want to. I'm just bad right now.''

Farrell was questioned Friday about the seemingly contradictory analysis.

"The commentary was, here was a guy coming off an outing where he had best velocity he's shown all year -- up to 97 mph,'' said Farrell, "strikes out 10 over six-plus innings. He made some mistakes in the middle of the middle of the plate. But in terms of just raw stuff, I thought he showed a curveball that had much more consistent depth to it than in more recent starts.

So in terms of raw stuff, I thought it was one of his better outings of the year. The execution?

No, that wasn't as good as the game against San Francisco or the game against Seattle.

"Whether that's a differing opinion from someone else? That was just my view of the raw stuff.''

Sean McAdam can be followed on Twitter: @Sean_McAdam

O’Sullivan will return to make start for Red Sox on Sunday

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O’Sullivan will return to make start for Red Sox on Sunday

BOSTON - Sean O'Sullivan -- and not Aaron Wilkerson -- is the Red Sox choice for Sunday's plug-in starter as the Sox search for a temporary replacement for Eduardo Rodriguez's spot in their starting rotation.
      
"That was the recommendation,'' said John Farrell of the choice to go with  O'Sullivan. "Granted, Wilkerson's been throwing the ball well there. But the recommendation was for Sean to come back here and pitch on Sunday.''
      
O'Sullivan made two starts earlier this season, allowing four runs in six innings to the New York Yankees on May 10 before being battered for six runs (five earned) in 4 1/3 innings against Houston five days later.
      
Overall, O'Sullivan is 6-2 with a 2.79 ERA in 11 starts for the Pawsox this season.
      
Wilkerson, who was pitching in independent ball just two years ago, is 4-1 with a 2.20 ERA in eight appearances -- seven starts -- at Pawtucket.
      
O'Sullivan's stay with the Red Sox is expcted to be brief, since the Red Sox can through next week and first 10 days of the second half without a fifth starter.
      
"It's likely that spot will come up just once,'' confirmed Farrell. "With next Thursday's off-day, we've got a chance to make sure that [Rick] Porcello and [David] Price get on the mound before the break and that's the direction we're leaining in right now.''

Holt 'definitely happy' to be back with Red Sox

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Holt 'definitely happy' to be back with Red Sox

BOSTON -- After an absence of more than a month, Brock Holt was back in the Red Sox lineup Friday night, playing left field and batting sixth. Holt had been sidelined with a concussion he suffered in early May in a game against Oakland.

"It's good to see Brock back in the lineup,'' said John Farrell. "It will certainly allow for not only a left-handed bat in left field but also the ability to somewhat deepen our bench.''

"I feel good,' said Holt. "I've been working to get back here. Obviously, it took a lot longer than I had hoped, but I'm definitely happy to be back.''

This was the second concussion suffered by Holt, who also incurred one in September 2014. Holt was originally placed on the seven-day concussion DL on May 20 before later being transferred to the 15-day DL.

While on a rehab assignment in Pawtucket, Holt was still experiencing some slight post-concussion symptoms, but he and the club believe he's ready to return.

"There's still a little bit more to improve on,'' said Holt. "But I'm definitely feeling a lot better. In my rehab games down there, I was able to put together good at-bats and hit some balls hard, so that definitely gave me some confidence to take the next step.''

Holt said he occasionally feels "a little light-headedness. Sometimes it comes and goes; sometimes I don't feel it all. It's definitely a lot better than where it was and I feel confident in taking the next step and to come up here and contribute.''

Holt has been told the remaining symptoms will eventually dissipate.

"Then I'll be normal,'' he said. "It's just part of the process. Getting into rehab games was a big step. Now, getting back here is the next step. As long as I just keep doing what I'm doing, it should be normal.''

It's uncertain how regularly Holt can play, but the Red Sox will ease him back into an everyday routine.

"He'll be checked on daily,'' said Farrell, "The progression that he's come through, we know there's going to be diminshing symptoms as we go along. The plan right now is for him to play tonight and Sunday against two right-handers. Beyond that, we'll continue to monitor his availability and check on him every day.''