McAdam: Pinch-hit move yet another strange one by Valentine


McAdam: Pinch-hit move yet another strange one by Valentine

TORONTO - At a time of year when the games should be routine and otherwise unremarkable, just one more day crossed off a most forgettable Red Sox calendar, Sunday's 5-0 loss to the Toronto Blue Jays managed to somehow stand out.

The Sox and Jays were scoreless in the seventh when Pedro Ciriaco singled with two outs.

Shortstop Jose Iglesias, scheduled to hit next, took his place in the batter's box. With the count 1-and-2, Ciriaco broke for second, giving the Sox a runner in scoring position.

Then, much to just about everyone's surprise, Iglesias was called back from the batter's box and replaced by pinch-hitter Daniel Nava.

Nava then hit the first pitch back to pitcher Brandon Lyon, who threw Nava out and ended the inning.

"Just trying to get a run for Jon (Lester), obviously," explained Bobby Valentine when asked about the logic behind the move. "I told Daniel if he steals second, 'You got it.' Otherwise, I was all set to play defense. Nothing-nothing. Guy gets to second base, you want to take a shot at a base hit."

In May or June, sure. For a team fighting for a playoff spot, of course. But for a team that went into Sunday tied for fourth place, 14 games under .500?

And that doesn't begin to address the issue of Iglesias's confidence. If the Sox still view Iglesias as their shortstop of the future -- maybe even their shortstop of the near future - that seemed like a curious move.

Why damage Iglesias's confidence? More to the point, why not see how he handles such an opportunity?

"I was pinch-hit with the bases loaded and a 3-and-2 count on me," said Valentine. "It didn't ruin my confidence. I think he'll get over it. I talked to him. He said, 'whatever's best for the team.'"

Valentine continually cited the attempt to get a win for Lester, who has pitched better than his record would indicate. But remember, Valentine wasn't quite so solicitous of Lester's feelings when he left him in for 11 runs in four innings against this same Toronto lineup in July.

"It's tough," said Valentine of the balance that must be navigated between trying to win and trying to evaluate. "Jon's pitching such a good game. You get him a run there, he wins the ballgame. He's battling, too. It's not about one guy; it's about the whole group of guys.

"There's a good balance there. Guy's just pitched 100 pitches, trying to win a baseball game. There'll be plenty of time to evaluate. I don't think that's a make-or-break situation. He's got one hit so far. There will be a lot of opportunities to get some hits. It's not kindergarten here.

"You don't think it was the right decision? So what. I think it was the right thing to do to try to win a game for a guy (Lester) who's busting his butt out there."

For his part, Iglesias was diplomatic and deferential.

"The manager made a decision," he said. "He's trying to do the best for the team and I respect the decision. I was ready to hit. I put some good ABs together today. That's all I can do and whatever decision he made, I respect him."

Nava said he was told "to be ready" if Ciriaco reached scoring position.

"I think anyone who comes off the bench, you know you've got to be ready," he said. "I didn't know the exact details of when I could be going in, because you never know if you are. But for a guy who comes off the bench, it doesn't matter if it's a fresh count or in the middle of the at-bat -- you have to be ready."

Nava acknowledged he felt badly for Iglesias, pulled off the field in the middle of an at-bat ("Oh yeah, totally").

When the season is over, it's highly unlikely being lifted for a pinch-hitter mid at-bat will scar Iglesias for the rest of his career.

But when the season is over, would it have mattered if the Sox finish with 71 wins instead of 72? Or with 72 instead of 73?

Instead, it's likely to be remembered for what it was: a strange move made during a lousy year, one that didn't make much sense in the big picture.

Bradley, Betts, Pedroia are A.L. Gold Glove finalists


Bradley, Betts, Pedroia are A.L. Gold Glove finalists

Jackie Bradley Jr. in center field, Mookie Betts in right and Dustin Pedroia at second base are the Red Sox' finalists for the American League Gold Glove awards.

The Blue Jays’ Kevin Pillar and the Rays’ Kevin Kiermaier are the other A.L. center field finalists. The White Sox’ Adam Eaton and Astros’ George Springer are A.L. right field finalists. Joining Pedroia as second base finalists are the Mariners’ Robinson Cano and Tigers’ Ian Kinsler.

Peoria has won four Gold Gloves. Bradley and Betts have yet to win one.

The full list of finalists is here.  The awards will be presented on Nov. 8 at 8 p.m. on ESPN

The Red Sox sent out a series of tweets backing each player’s candidacy.

Betts is also a front-runner for the American League Most Valuable Player.


Ortiz wins Hank Aaron Award as top hitter in American League


Ortiz wins Hank Aaron Award as top hitter in American League

CLEVELAND -- David Ortiz is heading into retirement with some more hardware.

The Boston Red Sox slugger captured the Hank Aaron Award on Wednesday as the top hitter in the American League this season. Budding Chicago Cubs star Kris Bryant was honored as the top hitter in the National League.

The award was presented before Game 2 of the World Series between the Cubs and Cleveland. It was determined through a combination of fan voting and a panel that includes Aaron and other Hall of Fame players.

The 40-year-old Ortiz hit .315 with 38 home runs, 127 RBIs and 48 doubles in the 20th and final season of his major league career. His 541 career home runs rank 17th all-time.

The 24-year-old Bryant hit .292 with 39 home runs and 102 RBIs while helping the Cubs cruise to the NL Central title and eventually a spot in the World Series. Shortly after being honored, Bryant singled in the first inning for his first Series hit.