Lesson learned for Bobby V.

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Lesson learned for Bobby V.

Last night, on the Bobby Valentine Show

Tom Caron: So, Bobby. Hows it been managing a guy like Dustin Pedroia this season? Coachs dream, right?

Valentine: Oh yeah, you know. Dustins been great. Hes really getting out there and leading this club, and really does just about everything you need.

Caron: Yup. That sounds about ri

Valentine: The thing about Dustin, though. Hes just so small.

Caron: OK, th

Valentine: And I think thats going to hurt us at some point this season.

Caron: Umm. Wow, so do y

Valentine: All things being equal, I just like my second basemen a little taller Toby Harrah, Julio Franco, Edgardo Alfonzo. Thats just my preference. So when it comes to that position, well see what we can do about getting a little more size out there.

We now take you live to Fenway Park

Reporters: Bobby! Bobby! Have you spoken with Dustin this morning?

Valentine: Yes, yes. We spoke. And listen, this is such a misunderstanding. I explained that to him, and that was that. Were moving on.

Reporters: Bobby! What do you mean misunderstanding? You said he was too short . . .

Valentine: Guys, listen. You know, this has all been taken the wrong way. Honestly, I just thought I was answering a question. I never knew people would actually listen to the answer! This wasn't my intention, and I told Dustin that. Im not sure if he believes me, but thats the truth.

Reporters: But Bobby

Valentine: Heres the thing that you guys dont get, and what I explained to Dustin. I wasnt saying that hes too short. I said you know he was too small. Yeah, thats it. Its just that sometimes, he just uhh he crouches down a little too much out there. Right? You know, small? Hes ummm he makes himself so much smaller than he really is. And as a former middle infielder, you know, I just, uhhh, that just seems little inefficient. And thats what I meant. Id like him to be a little bit more upright. And moving forward, Im going to do my best to see if we cant get him to play a little taller.

Of course this didnt really happen.

But given the circus we watched unfold yesterday, its not too far-fetched, right?

Oh. It is?

OK, well then lets just move on.

Not back, to what actually happened yesterday, to all the bombs, back-tracking and confusion that filled Fenway Park. That story's way passed overkill anyway, and the truth is that we'll probably never get the truth. My guess is that it falls somewhere between our original assumption and Bobby's BS explanation. That his intentions were neither as malicious as everyone initially thought, nor as innocent as he ultimately claimed. But either way, it's time to move on.

Hell, the Texas Rangers are in town. The two-time defending AL champion Rangers. The 8-2, second-best-record-in-baseball Rangers. Not to mention, despite taking three of four from the Rays, the Sox are still only 4-6. They're still in last place.

This is an enormous series on the horizon, one that dwarfs, or at least should dwarf any petty behind-the-scenes drama between a loose-lipped manager and exceedingly malcontent veteran. So let's treat it that way. Let's put it in the past.

But as part of moving forward, let's also lay out one ground rule for any and all future Bobby Valentine-related drama:

Ignorance is no longer an excuse.

If he wants to keep doing things his way. That's cool. If he wants to lift the veil that Terry Francona had stapled to the floor of that clubhouse, hold players publicly accountable and give Boston and its fans an unfiltered perspective of what he sees in his team. All the power to him.

The Red Sox didn't bring him here to be Francona. For better or worse, they brought him here to be Bobby Valentine. So if Bobby Valentine thinks the best way to get his team to play for him and with each other is to continue making vague and enigmatic statements about his players in the media, then he should. He should do it his way and achieve the success he has planned for himself and this team, or go down guns blazing.

But he should never be surprised by the reaction.

"I never thought this would become a big deal."

"I wasn't trying to be critical."

"I should have said this."

"I really meant that."

It doesn't work. Not anymore. It barely worked yesterday.

If Valentine's as smart and aware as he'd like us to believe, then there's no longer any question in his mind as to what constitutes a "big deal" in Boston, as to what will be taken the wrong way, blown out of proportion and morphed into an immediate and enormous controversy.

Everything will.

He should have known that already. But has to know that now.

Rich can be reached at rlevine@comcastsportsnet.com. Follow Rich on Twitter at http:twitter.comrich_levine

Turner jokes that Celtics will retire his number

Turner jokes that Celtics will retire his number

It’s not the craziest thing someone has said on Twitter, but Evan Turner tweeted Monday that the Celtics should retire his number. 

It was a joke, of course, as the former Celtic was reacting to news that Isaiah Thomas had said he liked the No. 11 and would change his jersey number if so many people in Boston hadn’t already purchased his No. 4 jersey. 

After Turner joked that No. 11 was going to be retired, Thomas joked back that he would wear No. 11 as a tribute to the current Trail Blazer. 

Prior to being traded to Boston, Thomas wore No. 22 for Sacramento and No. 3 for Phoenix. 

Curran: McDaniels staying with Pats shouldn't be a shocker

Curran: McDaniels staying with Pats shouldn't be a shocker

For weeks the speculation regarding Josh McDaniels wasn't a matter of "if" but "when."

But while national media had McDaniels signed, sealed and delivered to multiple landing spots, the proposition that he'd leave at all was never a likelihood. 

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The Rams weren't attractive to him from the outset. Jacksonville didn't excite him, either. And on Monday, he passed on the 49ers opportunity. 

The lure of a blank slate in San Fran at quarterback and GM didn't outpace the uncertainty of going cross-country to work for a seemingly dysfunctional franchise that's cycled rapidly through coaches and has an unrealistic sense that it's a long, long way removed from its glory days, the only remnant remaining from that being perhaps the logo on the helmet. 

With four kids and a job McDaniels considers one of the 10 best on coaching -- head man or no -- he will stay on as the Patriots' offensive coordinator.

"I was really impressed with (Niners owner) Jed York and (team executive) Paraag Marathe . . . and the people that came from the 49ers organization," McDaniels said on a conference call this morning. "They did a great job with their presentation. Humbled to be included in that process. At this time it's just best for my family and myself to remain here in New England and focus on this year's playoffs and finish out the year however it turns out."

The same faulty speculative reasoning that had McDaniels as good as gone from the Patriots will move on undeterred today and surmise that McDaniels is staying with the Patriots because he knows, or has been promised, that he'll receive the head coaching job when Bill Belichick steps aside. 

While the Kraft family certainly thinks highly of McDaniels and that could come to pass, anyone tapping their foot and checking their watch waiting for Belichick to step down is in for a long wait. He's showing no signs of wrapping it up and, while I haven't been told directly McDaniels isn't the automatic successor, he wouldn't be taking interviews at all if he were assured that. 

What will be interesting to see is whether interest remains high in him for other jobs or the perception that he's never going to leave means teams don't bother to ask. San Fran obviously had its heart set on McDaniels. Even though Nick Caserio passed on the chance to interview with the Niners for their open GM job, the team did talk to Louis Riddick about the spot. He and McDaniels have high regard for each other. 

Between McDaniels, Caserio and defensive coordinator Matt Patricia, the people closest to Belichick on the coaching flow chart all had chances to go somewhere else and all passed on the chance. It's another example of not why the Patriots are good but why they remain good. Stability.