Kalish hopes to finally be on the road to full health

625262.jpg

Kalish hopes to finally be on the road to full health

FORT MYERS, Fla. -- Ryan Kalish thought the worst was behind him.

It turns out he was wrong.

Kalish's last two seasons were marred by neck and shoulder surgeries. After two procedures and plenty of rehab, he thought he on the road to full health.

But over the winter, Kalish began experiencing some pain in his right shoulder -- he had undergone an operation in his left (throwing) surgery after the 2011 season. After trying to overcome the discomfort, he recently gave in to the inevitable and underwent a procedure by noted orthopedist Dr. Lewis Yocum at the end of January.

The surgery repaired a torn labrum and will keep the outfielder sideline from anywhere from four to six months, effectively wiping out most -- if not all -- of 2013.

"Obviously, I've been really down," said Kalish. "I kind of disappeared and I didn't talk (to reporters) and I apologize. But it's been really tough for me. I really just want to play again. At this point, I'm just tired of being hurt.

"I'm happy that I got it fixed because it just wasn't working. It was just too much pain and too hard to play with. It wouldn't have been good for me or the team, so it was definitely time to do it."

Were he healthy, Kalish was going to be given the chance to be part of a platoon in left field with Jonny Gomes, with the Sox looking for a lefthanded bat to pair with Gomes.

Instead, for the second spring in row, however, Kalish is little more than a bystander in spring training, limited to cardio work and some drills that don't involve using his right shoulder, which sits in a sling.

The issue with the right shoulder dates back to last season, when he experienced soreness as soon as was cleared to swing a bat. He appeared in 36 games with the Sox, but clearly wasn't himself, amassing just three extra-base hits in 96 at-bats. He hit just .229 with an OPS of .532.

"I had a feeling (it was an issue),'' he said. "Obviously, with all I've been through, the last thing I wanted to do was another surgery. We decided to keep pushing through and keep trying. Eventually, after a couple of shutdowns and more strengthening and no swinging, then as soon as you pick up the swinging, it hurts again.

"Eventually, I just got tired of it and I had to make the call. I said 'Listen, I just can't do this anymore. The pain is one thing; but the other is my head. It's been a crazy ride since 2010 and I just need to get healthy."

Doctors have told him that this injury may have been the result of trying to compensate for his surgically-repaired left shoulder last season, but Kalish suspects the right shoulder was damaged previously.

"When you come back from a surgery during the season," said Kalish, "you're going to feel that injury. I don't know if I was able to get through the zone as much with my left shoulder, which (forced me to) use my right. Obviously, we'll never really know the truth. But it hurt too much to do anything good for anybody."

With months of rehab ahead, Kalish's lone consolation is that there's little more that can go wrong with his upper torso.

"Once you have the two shoulders the neck,'' he said, "I think it's time to be right. I hope."

Sunday's Red Sox-Blue Jays lineup: Ortiz a late scratch

red-sox-xander-bogaerts.jpg

Sunday's Red Sox-Blue Jays lineup: Ortiz a late scratch

David Ortiz was a late scratch from Sunday's lineup because his left foot is sore after getting hit by a pitch Saturday. Travis Shaw moves up to the fourth spot in the order at first base, Hanley Ramirez becomes the DH and Josh Rutledge will bat seventh at third base.

After extending his streak to 21 games Saturday, Xander Bogaerts faces a familiar foe in R.A. Dickey. So far the matchup has been favorable for the shortstop, batting .364 through 35 at-bats against the knuckleballer. 

Dickey, on the other hand, has been on the wrong side of matchups against Boston since joining the Blue Jays. In 2016 alone, he's allowed eight runs in 9.2 innings in his two starts against the Red Sox. He faces a lineup that has five players who are hitting .275 or better against him through at least 10 career plate appearances against the righty. Shaw leads that charge, going 4-10 so far off Dickey with a homerun and two doubles. Rutledge is the lone Red Sox hitter yet to face Dickey.

The lineups:

BLUE JAYS:
Jose Bautisa RF
Josh Donaldson 3B
Edwin Encarnacion DH
Justin Smoak 1B
Devon Travis 2B
Darwin Barney SS
Kevin Pillar CF
Ezquiel Carrera LF
Josh Thole C
---
R.A. Dickey P

RED SOX:
Mookie Betts RF
Dustin Pedroia 2B
Xander Bogaerts SS
Travis Shaw 1B
Hanley Ramirez DH
Jackie Bradley Jr. CF
Josh Rutledge 3B
Christian Vazquez C
Blake Swihart LF
---
David Price P

The price of being the ace

red-sox-david-price-040516.jpg

The price of being the ace

David Price has a chance for his first “ace” moment to show Boston he’s truly the pitcher they paid for.

The bullpen is spent after giving up the game late Saturday, to go with the team dealing with a three game skid -- the longest since their three-game losing streak from April 17th – April 19th.

On top of the Sox not having lost four-straight yet in 2016, Price is back at the Rogers Centre for the first time since his playoff run with the Blue Jays last year.

So this game should have a playoff feel to it -- as much as one can in late May -- especially with the Toronto picking up steam.

And lastly for Price, he’s started to figure things out since making a mechanical adjustment following his atrocious 4.2 inning start against the Yankees earlier in the month.

But he hasn’t had to throw against a top of the line offense yet.

The lefty dominated Houston, much like everyone has this year and also did well against Colorado.

In between those two he did face a strong opponent in Kansas City, but the Royals still haven’t completely gotten things together (although they did mount a ridiculous comeback Saturday against the White Sox).

Toronto’s scored over seven runs in three of their last four, winning all four of those games and seven of the last 10 contests -- putting them four games behind Boston in the AL East standings.

Price does have a few things going for him entering Sunday’s contest.

He threw well against his old team earlier this year -- seven innings, two earned runs, nine strikeouts and zero walks -- when his mechanics weren’t where he wanted them.

Also after being traded to Detroit from Tampa Bay in 2014, Price was dominant in his returning start at Tropicana Field.

Although he took the loss 1-0, the lefty dealt, chucking a one-hitter over eight innings, striking out nine without walking a batter -- and the one run off of him was unearned.

Price has yet to pitch at Comerica Park since leaving the Tigers, so that’s something Boston may deal with later in the year, too.

Now Price has to block all of this from his mind and execute pitches, in what is his biggest test this point in the season.

A lot for him to ignore in what could’ve easily been a regular start had Boston’s bullpen done its job Sunday -- but then again, this is a part of the price of being an ace.

McAdam: Red Sox relievers didn’t do the job vs. Toronto

snc_mcadam_0528161464489191251_3450k_1280x720_694941763909.jpg

McAdam: Red Sox relievers didn’t do the job vs. Toronto

Sean McAdam joins SNC to discuss the Red Sox bullpen giving up a 4-run lead in the late innings of their loss to the Blue Jays.

Watch the video above.