Henry's versatility could be an asset for the Sox

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Henry's versatility could be an asset for the Sox

PAWTUCKET, R.I Sometimes a change of scenery is whats needed.

Justin Henry was the ninth-round pick of the Tigers out of the University of Mississippi in 2007. In six minor league seasons, the left-handed batter has hit a combined .293 with a .372 on-base percentage and .362 slugging percentage. In 181 games over parts of the past three seasons with Triple-A Toledo he hit .296.369.356 with 95 runs scored and 33 stolen bases in 50 attempts. In 543 plate appearances over 131 games in 2012 with the Mud Hens he hit .300.372.357 with 72 runs scored and 22 stolen bases in 34 attempts.

Justin does a lot of things well, said Red Sox director of player development Ben Crockett. He can play multiple positions, he runs well, he gets on base. Hes a good hitter. So I think all those things really make him a well-rounded player that can fit in in a lot of ways and has a chance to really help us in different ways. So those things in particular were attractive.

The Red Sox acquired Henry, who turns 28 in April, following Decembers Rule 5 draft. The Sox selected second baseman Jeff Kobernus from Washington in the draft, trading him to Detroit for Henry.

I was kind of hopeful that something may happen Henry said. I enjoyed my time in Detroit but I was just kind of hoping for something there. I was there for my whole career since I was drafted in 07. Obviously you want to make it to the big leagues and I didnt really know if I was going to get that opportunity there. So to be given an opportunity to go somewhere else, I was very excited about it.

Henry gives the Sox some roster flexibility because, although he was acquired pursuant to the Rule 5 draft, he is not subject to its directives and does not have to be kept on the major league roster for the upcoming season. He was not on the Tigers 40-man roster and did not have to be placed on the Sox 40-man.

But his versatility could be an asset for the Sox this season. Henry will likely start the season with Triple-A Pawtucket. He has played every position expect pitcher and catcher over the last six seasons. Henry made most of his appearances, 67, in center field last season. But he also played 25 games at second base and 37 games at third base. In order of appearances, over his career he has played 378 games at second, 101 in center, 85 in left, 60 at third, 30 in right, seven at first, and six at shortstop. He has no intention of adding catching or pitching to his resume, though.

I dont think I want to get behind the plate and I dont think anybody wants to see me on the mound, either, he said with a laugh. So Ill stick to the other seven.

For some players, though, that kind of versatility can be a sort of Catch-22 in which they are thought of as a jack-of-most-positions, master of none.

Its kind of a double-edged sword sometimes, Henry said. I feel like sometimes in the Detroit organization there were opportunities at some spots and I wasnt given that opportunity because I was thought of as a utility guy. So it can hurt you that way. But also every team needs a guy or two who can play everywhere. So I feel like it can help you and hurt you. Im hoping it will help me more than hurt me. So well see.

The Sox are not ready to put a label on him yet.

We need to get him into spring training and see him every day before I think were ready to make any evaluation and say that he necessarily will even be bounced around, Crockett said. He may be in one spot all year for us. I know he was in center field for a majority of last year, having done different things.

More than anything he hasnt really been a utility guy. Hes been a regular at different positions. But I think his athleticism allows him to do that. So I think that will give us the ability to get his bat in the lineup. But also I think certainly when youre talking about making that jump to the major league level that is a huge factor in terms of whatever that need might be, when the call might come.

Henry, who played winter ball in Venezuela in the past two offseasons, was at McCoy Stadium on Friday as part of the PawSox hot stove events, his first opportunity to meet some new teammates and front office personnel. He is anxious to get to spring training to show his new team what he can do, wherever on the field that might be.

Hopefully just come out and put my best foot forward, he said. Ive been working hard this offseason so I can be prepared when I go to spring training. You just want to make a good impression. Sometimes the first impression is an important one so Im planning on hopefully doing that.

First impressions: Red Sox implode in 6th inning, lose to Royals, 10-4

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First impressions: Red Sox implode in 6th inning, lose to Royals, 10-4

BOSTON -- First impressions from the Red Sox' 10-4 loss to the Kansas City Royals:

 

Boston’s bullpen continues to be a roll of the dice every night.

This time Matt Barnes was the latest reliever to suffer from the plague that’s filled this bullpen all season.

Part of it was bad luck on two perfectly placed balls, the other part was Raul Mondesi lacing a triple, and Lorenzo Cain smacking a single.

Robbie Ross was better, but not by much.

No lead seems safe in the hands of any Boston reliever.

 

David Ortiz keeps putting himself in the same breath as legendary Hall of Famers.

This time it was former Red Sox great Jimmie Foxx, who Ortiz is now tied with at 534 home runs, 18th all time.

Early in the season he’d match a legendary player every so often, it was impressive. Now it’s almost to be expected every night he plays.

Next on the all-time home run list is Yankee Legend Mickey Mantle with 536.

 

The bottom of the order continues to play an important role in Boston’s run production.

Chris Young got things started in the fifth, then Sandy Leon and Jackie Bradley Jr. kept it rolling so both Brock Holt and Xander Bogaerts could cash in all three runners.

Moving JBJ back to ninth Saturday proved to be a good move, and moving Leon back down with his recent scuffles seems to be the best move, too.

Not only can they knock each other in any given instance, but they also put Dustin Pedroia (or Holt) and Bogaerts in run-producing situations, as opposed to just setting the table.

 

Chris Young’s hamstring shouldn’t be too much of a problem.

He was able to leg out the soft grounder to third base in the first inning.

Young has lost a step or two with age, but it seemed like he opened it up on the play.

Hopefully that’s a sign of the end of the injuries in left field this season.

 

Junichi Tazawa looked strong.

That’s more so an observation of his fastball reaching 94 mph.

Tazawa has a long way to go before he’s back to where he was, but the righty took a step in the right direction Sunday night. He retired Kansas City’s 2-3-4 hitters in his first inning and working past a leadoff single in his second inning of work.