Hall of Fame thoughts

Hall of Fame thoughts
March 30, 2012, 9:07 pm
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Earlier this week, right around the time Curt Schilling was running his mouth about the inner workings of the Red Sox clubhouse, the Sox announced that Schil will be one of this year's inductees into the Red Sox Hall of Fame. In all, there are five former players and two non-players included in this year's class and they'll be inducted during a ceremony at Fenway Park on Tom Brady's birthday. (August 3)

Here's a quick rundown of who's headed to the Hall, with some commentary from the Standing Room Only staff.

Schilling: He may be brutally annoying in his post-playing days as opposed to only relatively annoying in his playing days but there's no question that Schil deserves a piece of this Hall of Fame pie. And if he's able to keep his acceptance speech a shade under three hours, I'll be happy to see him inducted.

Ellis Burks: For children of the '80s, Burks was the man. One of the first guys who made you feel cool for being a Red Sox fan. When my father used to pitch to me in the backyard growing up, any line drive hit would be referred to as "an Ellis Burks swing"; he was the guy I always wanted to "be." And in the end, Ellis had an unbelievable career. At this point, I don't really care how he did it, but he put up some ridiculous numbers. Over 18 season, he hit .291 with 352 homers, and while most of his damage was done outside of Boston, it was great to see him finish his career here and most importantly, finally get that ring.
Marty Barrett: The MVP of the 1986 ALCS, but more importantly, the Red Sox lead off hitter in RBI Baseball (even if I always used to replace him with a pinch hitter; coincidentally, Ellis Burks). Either accolade makes Barrett a worthy inductee.

Also, did you know that in 1995, Barrett won a 1.7M malpractice suit against Sox team physician Arthur Pappas, where Barrett claimed Pappas misdiagnosed a knee injury and performed medical procedures without his consent?

Better not bring that one up at the ceremony

Joe Dobson: Dobson pitched for the Sox from 1941-1950 (with two years off in the middle for military service) and finished his Boston career with a record of 106-72 and 3.57 ERA. According to Baseball-Reference, Dobson's nickname was Burrhead. That's a Hall of Fame nickname right there.

Dutch Leonard: People used to talk about the Curse of the Bambino, but I always called it the Curse of Dutch Leonard. Leonard won three rings as a pitcher for the Sox from 1912-1918, but in December of 1918 he was traded with Duffy Lewis and Ernie Shore to the New York Yankees for Ray Caldwell, Frank Gilhooley, Slim Love, Roxy Walters and 15,000.

The Sox didn't win another title for 86 years. Hopefully they'll exorcise whatever's left of those demons with this posthumous induction.
Jon I. Taylor: He owned the team from 1904-1911, but most importantly, he's the man who named Fenway Park. And thank God he did. If it weren't for Taylor's suggestion, they were going to call it Kenmore Caverns.

No they weren't.

Joe Mooney: The head groundskeeper from 1971-2000 and the current Director of Grounds Emeritus. A true legend of the groundskeeping game.

No truth to the rumor that he retired in 2000 after growing tired of washing Rich Garces' BBQ sauce stains out of the infield grass.

Rich can be reached at rlevine@comcastsportsnet.com. Follow Rich on Twitter at http:twitter.comrich_levine