Hall of Fame thoughts

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Hall of Fame thoughts

Earlier this week, right around the time Curt Schilling was running his mouth about the inner workings of the Red Sox clubhouse, the Sox announced that Schil will be one of this year's inductees into the Red Sox Hall of Fame. In all, there are five former players and two non-players included in this year's class and they'll be inducted during a ceremony at Fenway Park on Tom Brady's birthday. (August 3)

Here's a quick rundown of who's headed to the Hall, with some commentary from the Standing Room Only staff.

Schilling: He may be brutally annoying in his post-playing days as opposed to only relatively annoying in his playing days but there's no question that Schil deserves a piece of this Hall of Fame pie. And if he's able to keep his acceptance speech a shade under three hours, I'll be happy to see him inducted.

Ellis Burks: For children of the '80s, Burks was the man. One of the first guys who made you feel cool for being a Red Sox fan. When my father used to pitch to me in the backyard growing up, any line drive hit would be referred to as "an Ellis Burks swing"; he was the guy I always wanted to "be." And in the end, Ellis had an unbelievable career. At this point, I don't really care how he did it, but he put up some ridiculous numbers. Over 18 season, he hit .291 with 352 homers, and while most of his damage was done outside of Boston, it was great to see him finish his career here and most importantly, finally get that ring.
Marty Barrett: The MVP of the 1986 ALCS, but more importantly, the Red Sox lead off hitter in RBI Baseball (even if I always used to replace him with a pinch hitter; coincidentally, Ellis Burks). Either accolade makes Barrett a worthy inductee.

Also, did you know that in 1995, Barrett won a 1.7M malpractice suit against Sox team physician Arthur Pappas, where Barrett claimed Pappas misdiagnosed a knee injury and performed medical procedures without his consent?

Better not bring that one up at the ceremony

Joe Dobson: Dobson pitched for the Sox from 1941-1950 (with two years off in the middle for military service) and finished his Boston career with a record of 106-72 and 3.57 ERA. According to Baseball-Reference, Dobson's nickname was Burrhead. That's a Hall of Fame nickname right there.

Dutch Leonard: People used to talk about the Curse of the Bambino, but I always called it the Curse of Dutch Leonard. Leonard won three rings as a pitcher for the Sox from 1912-1918, but in December of 1918 he was traded with Duffy Lewis and Ernie Shore to the New York Yankees for Ray Caldwell, Frank Gilhooley, Slim Love, Roxy Walters and 15,000.

The Sox didn't win another title for 86 years. Hopefully they'll exorcise whatever's left of those demons with this posthumous induction.
Jon I. Taylor: He owned the team from 1904-1911, but most importantly, he's the man who named Fenway Park. And thank God he did. If it weren't for Taylor's suggestion, they were going to call it Kenmore Caverns.

No they weren't.

Joe Mooney: The head groundskeeper from 1971-2000 and the current Director of Grounds Emeritus. A true legend of the groundskeeping game.

No truth to the rumor that he retired in 2000 after growing tired of washing Rich Garces' BBQ sauce stains out of the infield grass.

Rich can be reached at rlevine@comcastsportsnet.com. Follow Rich on Twitter at http:twitter.comrich_levine

HEISMAN: Lousiville's Lamar Jackson wins College Football's highest award

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HEISMAN: Lousiville's Lamar Jackson wins College Football's highest award

NEW YORK -- Lamar Jackson leapt over a loaded field of Heisman Trophy contenders early in the season and by the time he slowed down nobody could catch him.

The sensational sophomore quarterback became the first Louisville player to win the Heisman Trophy on Saturday night, beating out preseason favorite Deshaun Watson of Clemson despite some late-season struggles.

Baker Mayfield finished third and Oklahoma teammate and fellow finalist Dede Westbrook was fourth. Michigan's Jabrill Peppers was fifth.

For more clicke here . . .

Bruins lose third straight with 4-1 loss to Leafs

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Bruins lose third straight with 4-1 loss to Leafs

BOSTON -- The Bruins’ season has gone in extreme swings both up and down thus far through the first couple of months, and that was the case as they lost their third game in a row to the Maple Leafs on Saturday night.

The Bruins couldn’t only scratch for one goal despite outshooting the Maple Leafs by a 32-20 margin, and fell by a disappointing 4-1 score to the young and talented Toronto club at TD Garden.

The Bruins never enjoyed a lead in the game against the Leafs, and were flirting with danger after failing to score in the first period despite out-shooting Toronto by an 11-2 margin in the game’s opening 20 minutes. Instead it was a David Pastrnak neutral zone turnover in the second period that was picked off by William Nylander, and ended with Auston Matthews firing a rocket over Tuukka Rask for his 12th goal of the season.

Toronto extended the lead with five minutes to go in the period when Zach Hyman tipped a wobbly Jake Gardiner point shot past Rask, and made it three games in a row that the Bruins have dug themselves a considerable hole. Brad Marchand got one goal back at the end of the second period on a nice hustle play as he sealed off Frederik Anderson’s clearing attempt and then stuffed the puck past the Leafs goalie on a second chance bid.

That’s the way the score remained until the third period when the Bruins couldn’t convert on a couple of offensive chances -- included a bang-bang shorthanded bid for Austin Czarnik in front of the net -- and then James van Riemsdyk scored in front as a Toronto power play expired. That was the backbreaker for a Black and Gold bunch that continues to scrap for goals, and has now scored two goals or less in 20 of their 20 games this season.

Connor Brown added an empty netter in the final two minutes of the game to truly put it out of reach for the Bruins.