Good health, discipline leads to Nava's four hits

798442.jpg

Good health, discipline leads to Nava's four hits

BOSTON Daniel Nava returned to the starting lineup Wednesday night, going 4-for-5 to lead the Red Sox in the hit column with two runs scored in the 15-5 win over the Rays at Fenway Park.

Nava tied his career high for hits in a game, which he set on June 1 in Toronto, as he raised his average from .309 to .333.

Nava ho hum, hes well rested, Valentine said, tongue in cheek. Hes a very good player, playing very well. He hit four different types of pitches tonight too. Hes in a nice little groove. Glad hes healthy and back.

Nava had appeared in the previous four games, but had not started since June 9. He was scratched from the next days starting lineup just before game time because of a sore left hand. His hand, obviously, is much better.

The hands feeling really good, he said. Its felt good for a couple days. Weve just been making sure that its progressing in the right direction. You dont want to push it too quick and then send it a couple days backwards. So I think thats the thinking we had in the whole situation.

In 13 games since June 1, Nava is hitting .375, going 16-for-37, with eight runs scored, and multiple hits in five games in that stretch.

Part of his success comes from his ability to see many pitches, being selective and waiting for the one he can handle. In his five at-bats Wednesday, he saw 21 pitches.

Hes a good hitter, said Mike Aviles. You look at what hes done so far. He comes up and hes very patient and I think if the balls not where he wants, he doesnt swing. So when you have an eye like that, it benefits you. I wish I had an eye like that because I cant take that many pitches. But he takes a bunch of pitches because its not the one that he knows he can do something with. So it works out well and hes done a great job for us.

He has started eight games in the lead-off spot this season, batting .344 (11-for-32).

Batting leadoff is not that much different just because my approach is generally the same, he said. Its work the count, get the pitch that I want and then if I get the two strikes, its still put a good swing on a ball. So nothing really changes except that when youre the lead-off guy the first time youre actually a true lead-off batter. So I think thats the only time it changes because I do try and see more pitches.

Nava didnt receive an invitation to major league spring training this year. He started the season with Triple-A Pawtucket, getting called up on May 10 because of injuries to other outfielders. Still, he takes a game like this, with a career-high in hits, in stride.

No more than all the other ones, to be totally honest, he said of what it means to him. I dont set different games in higher esteem or whatever because its baseball and we have a lot of games left. We got a good little, some momentum going and well take the ones when we can get them . . . The lineup we have is good. Just be yourself.

Dombrowski knows ‘winning the winter’ isn’t the ultimate goal

Dombrowski knows ‘winning the winter’ isn’t the ultimate goal

NATIONAL HARBOR, Md -- In the span on less than 12 hours earlier this week, the Red Sox injected some impact players onto their roster, moves that cost them a large chunk of their farm system but made them the prohibitive favorites in the American League.
    
By adding All-Star starter Chris Sale, power set-up man Tyler Thornburg and first baseman Mitch Moreland (though the Sox have not confirmed the latter yet), the team was remade and became the talk of the Winter Meetings.
     
But Dave Dombrowski knows that "winning the winter'' can be a hollow achievement. It's what happens when the games start that will truly matter.
     
"We feel good,'' said Dombrowski as he got ready to depart. "We feel like we have a better ballclub. We feel like we've helped ourselves. Our guys have done a good job here all week long. So, we feel good about it.
     
"In the winter time, winning doesn't really mean anything. We've had that situation before. It really comes down to how well you play. That's why when people ask me to made predictions, I never make them. I think we have a club that can compete. I like our ballclub. But you really have to go about it on a day-in, day-out basis and take care of your business and I think our club will do that.''
     
The Red Sox, of course, won the A.L. East, but were summarily dismissed in the Division Series by the Cleveland Indians, who swept them in three straight.
     
The Sox were the best offensive club in the majors, but the retirement of David Ortiz takes a huge weapon out of their lineup. It's doubtful they'll score as many runs as they did a year ago.
     
Correspondingly, the Sox vastly improved their rotation with Sale, giving them three front-line starters and, in theory, a chance to go further into the postseason in 2017.
     
So deep are the Sox, in fact, that they now have seven established starters, a surplus that has them positioned to move one arm.
    
It may take some time for the market to develop, as clubs explore what's available from other teams and in free agency.
     
"I don't know what that will be,'' Dombrowski said. "We'll just kind of wait and see what takes place. I think a lot is dependent on other things that need to shake out. So our depth in starting pitching is somewhat new to people. They need time to analyze that. I had a couple clubs approach me about that [inside the Rule 5 draft] this morning. Again, we're not jumping. We'll just wait and see what happens.''
     
Dombrowski could choose to move either Drew Pomeranz or Clay Buchholz, though it would seem dumping Buchholz's $13.5 million contract would be his preference.
     
That would enable Dombrowski to get closer to the $195 million luxury tax threshold, which he has said is a preference not a mandate.
     
"I have a preference [in choosing which starter to move],’’ he said with a smile. "I won't share that with you, but I have a preference.''

 

Red Sox re-acquire INF Rutledge in Rule 5 draft

Red Sox re-acquire INF Rutledge in Rule 5 draft

NATIONAL HARBOR, Md. -- On Wednesday afternoon, Dave Dombrowski was asked what else he might be searching for to complete his roster.
     
Dombrowski, noting that Travis Shaw had been dealt away in the trade that brought the Red Sox reliever Tyler Thornburg, said the Red Sox could use another utility infielder to compete with left-handed-hitting Marco Hernandez.
     
On Thursday morning, Dombrowski found a familiar body in the unlikeliest of places.
     
The Sox selected Josh Rutledge from the Colorado Rockies in the Rule 5 draft. Rutledge, who was once obtained in exchange for outfielder Shane Victorino, spent parts of two seasons with the Red Sox, posting a slash line of .276/.338/.358 with a homer and 13 RBI in 67 games.
     
He missed most of last season with a knee injury and was outrighted by the Sox last month, becoming a free agent. He signed a minor league deal with the Rockies, but was unprotected by the Rockies and made available in Thursday's draft.
     
"We always liked him,'' said Dombrowski. "He thought his opportunity to play at the big league level was better [in Colorado]. But it was a situation for us, we looked at our club and we thought we might need a right-handed [hitting] utility infielder. We looked over the list and we like what he can do for our ballclub. So he was on obvious choice for us.''
     
Rutledge will compete against Marco Hernandez to become another bench player to team with Brock Holt on the Red Sox  roster.
     
Deven Marrero is also a righthand-hitting infielder, but his strength is defense and he's yet to prove he can hit major league pitching.
     
"I'd rather have someone [competing] who can swing the bat a little bit more,'' said Dombrowski. "I think [Rutledge] lines up to be on our club. We'll see what happens in spring training, but we know him, we like him. There looks like there's a path for him.''
     
Drafting Rutledge cost the Red Sox just $50,000 and he must  remain on the team's 25-man roster all season or, be offered back to the Rockies and placed on waivers.
     
The Sox also lost two players in the Rule 5 major league draft. The Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim chose right-handed pitcher Justin Haley, while the Baltimore Orioles chose outfielder Aneury Tavarez.