First pitch: Where do Red Sox go for power?

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First pitch: Where do Red Sox go for power?

ANAHEIM -- Across baseball, there has been almost universal acclaim for what the Red Sox accomplished last weekend.

By pulling off their nine-player megadeal with the Los Angeles Dodgers, the Sox not only gave their clubhouse a colonic of sorts, but also purged more than 250 million from future
payroll obligations.

Along the way, not incidentally, the Sox managed to obtain two highly-regarded pitching prospects.

But there is a caveat for some. While unloading the onerous contracts of Josh Beckett and Carl Crawford, the Red Sox also had to include Adrian Gonzalez.

That leaves the Sox with a significant hole in their lineup for the forseeable future. And with David Ortiz set to be eligible for free agency, the Sox head into this off-season without having anyone under control who can be counted on to, say, knock in 90 runs next seeason.

"I understand why they did the deal,'' said one talent evaluator of the Sox. "But I'm not sure they understand how hard it's going to be to go and replace someone like Gonzalez. Guys like that are hard to find.''

And, he could have added, getting harder. Beyond front-line starters, run producers and power hitters have become the the most valued commodity in the game.

Thanks to more thorough drug-testing, power -- and offense in general -- is down throughout baseball. Now that widespread PED use is believed to be a thing of the past, so, too, are the inflated numbers they brought.

A 30-homer season is, once again, an achievement, and not, as it was a decade ago, the expected output of a No. 7 hitter.

First base is still regarded as a power position, but the Sox currently have no one on the horizon for that spot. James Loney is slilck-fielding and has an RBI in each of his first three games since joining the Sox, but he will be eligible for free agency in the fall and is unlikely to be retained.

Loney's career high for homers is 13 and after back-to-back 90 RBI seasons in 2008 and 2009, his RBI totals have dwindled.

Moreover, there's little in the minor league system at the position. Soxprospects.com features one first baseman among its list of the top 40 prospects in the system -- Travis Shaw, at No. 28, and Shaw is just 25 games into his Double A career, having spent much of his first full season in pro ball at Single A Salem of the Carolina League.

Even the most optimistic projection wouldn't have Shaw competing for a spot on the big league roster until 2014.

Of course, it isn't completely necessary to get power out of first base, especially if a team can get suitable production somewhere else in the lineup.

But here again, the Sox' system is thin. The best power hitting prospect is outfielder Bryce Brentz, and he still needs to make significant progress when it comes to making regular contact.

Free agency doesn't offer much in the way of power. Steering clear of a potential landmine like Josh Hamilton, there's no one whom the Sox could sign -- any any position -- who could reasonably expect to produce 30 homers and 100 RBI. And if such a player existed, he'd cost the Sox close to 20 million annually, the kind of contract they just strained to rid themselves of.

A more likely avenue is the trade route, but the Sox are likely to make finding a young front-line starter a higher priority. To get one of those, multiple high-end prospects will need to be sacrificed, leaving less to put in a deal for a power hitter.

Ortiz, in all likelihood, will re-sign with the Sox, either for a year or two. But Ortiz cannot do it alone. When the Sox have been an elite offensive team, they've done so with a one-two middle-of-the-lineup combo: Ortiz-Ramirez; Ortiz-Bay, or Ortiz-Martinez.

And finding the other half of that pair may prove to be almost as challenging as unloading all the salary the Sox shed last weekend.

Before first open OTA practice, a quick look at Patriots media policy

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Before first open OTA practice, a quick look at Patriots media policy

FOXBORO -- The Patriots will hold their third OTA session of the spring on Thursday. It will be the first that is open to the media and will run for about two hours starting at 10:55 a.m. 

Because the Bills made headlines this week with their media policies during OTAs, below is a quick reminder of what is allowed and what isn't at Gillette Stadium during OTAs.

The policies have gone essentially unchanged since last year. Live tweeting or blogging during the practice is prohibited during a closed practice like Thursday's, but tweets following the session are allowed. (During practices that are open to the public, like training camp sessions with fans in attendance, some live updates are permitted.)

Here are the rules in detail, courtesy of the Patriots media relations staff . . . 

Media attending practices during OTAs are asked to cooperate in observing the following practice policies:

1. Please do not report on strategy. This includes describing formations, personnel groups, first-team/second-team groupings and non-conventional plays.

2. Live streaming of any video during practice or open locker room periods to the Internet or any other social media platform while on team premises is prohibited. 

3. Please do not quote, paraphrase or report the comments made by coaches or players during a practice session.

4. Please do not provide any live report updates during practice, this includes tweeting, blogging or posts to any social media platforms.

5. Please do not report on players who line up in positions different from the one listed on the roster.

If there are any questions regarding these policies during a practice session, please ask for clarification from a Patriots media relations representative in advance. Thank you in advance for your cooperation.

The Bills irked the Pro Football Writers Association earlier this week when it unveiled its new media policy for OTAs. 

The team has prohibited referencing plays run or game strategy, including trick plays or unusual formations. It has also banned media members from reporting on personnel groupings, sub-packages, players who are practicing with individual units (first-team, second-team, goal-line offense, nickel defense, etc.), special plays, who is rushing the passer, dropped passes, interceptions, quarterback completion percentage and other statistical information.

PFWA president Jeff Legwold wrote an email to the Associated Press this week that called the policy "a vast overreach of the guidelines in the [NFL’s] current media policy" and "not only unnecessary, it is not in compliance."

Quotes, notes and stars: Swihart flashes power and speed

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Quotes, notes and stars: Swihart flashes power and speed

BOSTON - Quotes, notes and stars from the Red Sox' 10-3 win over the Colorado Rockies:

 

QUOTES

"I felt a little cramp. I'm fine. I appreciate John and everybody looking out (for me). We obviously don't want anything to happen like last year, but I'm good.'' - Dustin Pedroia, who left the game in the fifth after experiencing some tightness in his right hamstring.

"It's nice to be able to get deep into the game. That's my goal every time. My goal is nine innings, so if I don't get nine innings, I'm a little disappointed because I want to be able to go out there and pitch as many innings as I can.'' - Steven Wright.

"I think my release point was just a little off. That definitely makes it hard, especially when it's moving, because it's not a consistent release point.'' - Wright on the early-inning unpredictability of his signature pitch.

"Even when I was catching, I pride myself on running. I want to be an athlete back there. I want to run the bases, steal bases, things most catchers aren't known to do.'' - Blake Swihart, who hit two triples.

 

NOTES

* Jackie Bradley Jr. extended his hitting streak to 29 games.

* Xander Bogaerts extended his hitting streak to 18 games.

* David Ortiz tied Paul Molitor for 12th on the all-time doubles list with 605.

* Ortiz has driven in multiple runs in three straight games

* Dustin Pedroia has a career batting average of .340 in interleague play, the highest ever for someone with 500 or more at-bats.

* Travis Shaw drove in three runs and now has 68 RBI in his first 111 games since Fred Lynn and Jim Rice in 1974-75.

* Blake Swihart became the third Red Sox hitter this season to post two triples in the same game.

* The Red Sox clinched their fifth straight home series win.

* The Sox are 21-8 since April 24 and are 13-2 in their last 15 home games.

 

STARS

1) Steven Wright

Backed by some rare run support, Wright evened his record at 4-4 with seven-plus innings and his eighth quality start this season.

2) Travis Shaw

Shaw produced two hits and knocked in three runs, making him the fourth Red Sox player this season to reach 30 RBI.

3) Blake Swihart

Swihart got to flash both his power and his speed by hitting two triples to the triangle, motoring around the bases.