Farrell: New players will help changing culture

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Farrell: New players will help changing culture

FORT MYERS, Fla. John Farrell was not with the Red Sox for their horrendous 2012 or their disastrous final month of the 2011 season. But as the teams new manager it now falls to him to address how he hopes to improve the team's culture for 2013.

I think theres a balance to how much thats to be talked about, Farrell said Tuesday afternoon sitting outside the Sox clubhouse at the teams spring training facility. Certainly we cant wipe away whats taken place. Its important that we acknowledge it. But as Ive talked to guys throughout the offseason what we do going forward is where the focus has to be. Just by virtue of nine new players on a 25-man roster is going to have some natural tendency to change that.

"But the most important thing is that we earn the trust of one another inside the clubhouse first. And going from there is the style of play that people can identify with this group as a team and confident that the makeup of the group initially will put ourselves in a position to do that.

The new players the Sox brought in have reputations for being high-character people. Which should help to make Farrells job easier.

I think its very important because in addition to the talent that was needed and brought in, general manager Ben Cherington and his staff combined the makeup of the individual to bring into a team environment some of the culture that is in the process of changing, said Farrell. So when we sought the person inside the player these were clear targets of ours.

Its a point he hopes fan will recognize, and he can reinforce. But he also knows actions speak louder than words.

We cant just talk about it. Weve got to go out and do it, Farrell said. And part of that regaining the trust or the faith of the fans, Im confident that the talent thats here plus the people that they are thisll be a team that I really believe that people will identify with, the effort, the energy that they bring every night, and the respect for the game that they have.

First impressions: Red Sox implode in 6th inning, lose to Royals, 10-4

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First impressions: Red Sox implode in 6th inning, lose to Royals, 10-4

BOSTON -- First impressions from the Red Sox' 10-4 loss to the Kansas City Royals:

 

Boston’s bullpen continues to be a roll of the dice every night.

This time Matt Barnes was the latest reliever to suffer from the plague that’s filled this bullpen all season.

Part of it was bad luck on two perfectly placed balls, the other part was Raul Mondesi lacing a triple, and Lorenzo Cain smacking a single.

Robbie Ross was better, but not by much.

No lead seems safe in the hands of any Boston reliever.

 

David Ortiz keeps putting himself in the same breath as legendary Hall of Famers.

This time it was former Red Sox great Jimmie Foxx, who Ortiz is now tied with at 534 home runs, 18th all time.

Early in the season he’d match a legendary player every so often, it was impressive. Now it’s almost to be expected every night he plays.

Next on the all-time home run list is Yankee Legend Mickey Mantle with 536.

 

The bottom of the order continues to play an important role in Boston’s run production.

Chris Young got things started in the fifth, then Sandy Leon and Jackie Bradley Jr. kept it rolling so both Brock Holt and Xander Bogaerts could cash in all three runners.

Moving JBJ back to ninth Saturday proved to be a good move, and moving Leon back down with his recent scuffles seems to be the best move, too.

Not only can they knock each other in any given instance, but they also put Dustin Pedroia (or Holt) and Bogaerts in run-producing situations, as opposed to just setting the table.

 

Chris Young’s hamstring shouldn’t be too much of a problem.

He was able to leg out the soft grounder to third base in the first inning.

Young has lost a step or two with age, but it seemed like he opened it up on the play.

Hopefully that’s a sign of the end of the injuries in left field this season.

 

Junichi Tazawa looked strong.

That’s more so an observation of his fastball reaching 94 mph.

Tazawa has a long way to go before he’s back to where he was, but the righty took a step in the right direction Sunday night. He retired Kansas City’s 2-3-4 hitters in his first inning and working past a leadoff single in his second inning of work.