Crawford's wrist 'fine,' waiting on elbow

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Crawford's wrist 'fine,' waiting on elbow

BOSTON Left fielder Carl Crawford said his left wrist, on which he had surgery in mid-January, is fine, but hes waiting for his left elbow to heal. Crawford was moved from the 15-day to the 60-day disabled list on May 2.

Right now Im just still letting it rest up, trying to do little exercises with it right now, just waiting for the clearance from the doctor basically, Crawford said.

The pain from the shot just went away so now I think were going into another transition where we might start doing exercises with it. I still havent been able to throw yet. Im still a couple of weeks from throwing.

He may need to throw for a couple of weeks to get back to full health, but he is not sure.

In an ideal situation, yes, but I can't honestly tell you when, he said.

I think I should start hitting in a couple of weeks, pretty soon. I think Im going to actually start hitting before I throw.

Hes not sure of the progression once he does start throwing.

I hope its fast but I really dont know, he said. Im kind of going on what the doctors, whatever kind of program they make for me Im just going to try to follow that and let them know how I feel afterwards. But I hope its a quick one.

The good news is his wrist is healthy.

The wrist is doing fine, knock on wood, he said. Hopefully I dont have any more setbacks with that, but the wrist is actually feeling real good. The wrist is ready to go. Thats what stinks about this whole process: the wrist finally got well and I had this setback. So if the elbow was fine, Id be ready to go.

I definitely want to be out there. No secret about that but I just kind of have to go at the pace that they have me go. I can't go too fast or anything like that. I just have to be patient.

You just want to at least be able to see the team all together so you could see what we can do together but its frustrating not having everybody out there knowing what a lot of guys could be doing and we could help the team, so its a little frustrating."

First impressions from Red Sox' 8-3 win over Rockies

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First impressions from Red Sox' 8-3 win over Rockies

First impressions from the Red Sox' 8-3 win over the Colorado Rockies:

 

The Red Sox continue to use Fenway as their own little offensive playground.

Since April 20, the Red Sox are averaging exactly eight runs per game at home. That's just over a month of the covering 18 games.

They've also collected 10 or more hits in 16 of those 18 games, utilizing every bit of the field.

For the last two seasons, Fenway stopped being a tough place to play for opponents. But at home this year, the Sox have outscored opponents by 67 runs.

 

All of a sudden, the Red Sox are a triples team and Fenway is a triples haven.

A triple by Christian Vazquez - of all people -- gave the Red Sox a league-high 13 triples this season.

Fenway has a reputation for being a doubles park, but the ballpark has been home to 12 triples in 26 games - five by visiting teams and seven by the Red Sox. That translates into almost one every two games.

 

David Price was solid, but not spectacular.

The positives: Price got through the seventh inning for the fifth time this season. He walked just one and fanned six in seven innings.

He was hit hard a few times, with a homer into the visitor's bullpen allowed to Charlie Blackmon and a triple to the triangle for Carlos Gonzalez.

Consider it another step forward for Price, but it fell far short of dominant.

 

Koji Uehara's deception is heightened against teams that don't see him much.

Uehara allowed a leadoff single to D.J. LeMahieu, but then fanned three in a row, finishing each hitter off with his trademark split-finger fastball.

That pitch can be tough to recognize for hitters who see it a few times per season. For those in the National League who are largely unfamiliar with Uehara's splitter, it's apparently some sort of Kryptonite.