Box Score Bank: Fenway at 50

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Box Score Bank: Fenway at 50

Hey, did you hear that Fenway Park's turning 100?

True story. Equally true, is that 50 years ago, Fenway turned 50. But back then, the anticipation and drama wasn't nearly as thick. In fact, the only controversy occurred when Tom Yawkey found out the celebration wasn't "whites only."

OK, I'm sorry. That's not true (I don't think).

Let's change the subject and set the Box Score Bank for 50 years ago today

April 19, 1962

John F. Kennedy was 15 months into his presidency. "Good Luck Charm" by Elvis Presley was No. 1 on the Billboard charts. Lawrence of Arabia had just won Best Picture at the Oscars. Larry Luchhino was nothing but a weaselly 17-year-old. Jamie Moyer was just kicking off his third season in the majors.

And over at Fenway, one day before their glorious park turned 50, the Boston Red Sox had their way with the Tigers.

Final Score: Red Sox 9, Tigers 5

Gene Conley started and went 8.1 impressive innings for the Sox. Conley who was (and still is) 6'8'' is probably best known for playing for the Red Sox and the Celtics. But he also co-starred in one of the most legendary sports stories of all time. (For more, please click here). Young Lou Clinton paced the Sox with a homer, a triple and four RBI.

The win was one of only a few bright spots for the Sox (76-84), who finished eighth in the American League. But, much like this year, the onfield record in 1962 took a back seat to commemorating the history of the most important and historic structure in the history of the modern world: Fenway Park!

Here's to another 100 years.

Rich can be reached at rlevine@comcastsportsnet.com. Follow Rich on Twitter at http:twitter.comrich_levine

First impressions from Red Sox 10-9 loss to Blue Jays: Big trouble for bullpen

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First impressions from Red Sox 10-9 loss to Blue Jays: Big trouble for bullpen

BOSTON -- First impressions of the Red Sox' 10-9 loss to Toronto:
 
Rick Porcello was back in top form.

Despite the matchup at the Rogers Center being less than favorable for Porcello, and the righty not at his best of late, he held a streaking, dangerous offense at bay for 6 2/3 innings (four runs, seven hits) before the bullpen coughed up two leads. 

While Porcello hasn’t performed poorly of late, there’s no question he hasn’t been at his best -- so it’s good to see him have a consistent feel for his pitches.

The bullpen might be in trouble Sunday.

With Junichi Tazawa struggling, Craig Kimbrel throwing a season high 39 pitches and Matt Barnes pitching in both games this series, the bullpen won’t be at it’s best for the final game in Toronto. So, if there were ever a time for David Price to throw like a true ace, Sunday would be it.

Tommy Layne proves again that he’s not trustworthy.

With a four-run lead, and only needing to get two batters out, Layne couldn't get an out in the eighth, allowing two runs on two hits and starting something not even Kimbrel (who gave up leads in the eighth and ninth after being called on for a five-out save) could stop. The lefty specialist may have entered the game with an ERA below 3.00, but his results are inconsistent.
 
Umpire Mike DiMuro’s injury changed the tone of the game.

The home plate umpire took a hard foul ball off the center of the mask, delaying the game for several minutes and forcing Brian Gorman to call the game behind the plate.

And with that came an inconsistent strike zone. Both sides were frustrated by his inconsistency with his zone. Porcello had two pitches stopped due to late timeout calls. Marcus Stroman was almost allowed to quick pitch Hanley Ramirez twice in the same at-bat.

The crew got it right removing DiMuro from the game, but Gorman was bad in relief.
 
David Ortiz getting doubled up in the fourth inning can’t happen.

Darwin Barney showed some range, getting to Jackie Bradley, Jr.’s soft line drive up the middle, flipping the ball to second quickly after to get Ortiz. This comes a night after Hanley Ramirez got double up off a screaming line drive.

There’s a difference between the two though. Ramirez had no time to react. Ortiz had all the time in the world. Even though Papi’s speed hasn’t become enhanced in his old age -- unlike his power -- that was a rally-killing play he could’ve prevented.
 
Don’t sleep on Dustin Pedroia.

Between Ortiz’s farewell tour and the youth rising, Dustin Pedroia continues to perform well under the radar.

He went 2-for-4, lacing two doubles off Toronto’s ace, Marcus Stroman. Pedroia is hitting .309. He’s not the only player being overlooked, but he’s definitely received the least amount of attention in Boston’s power-packed lineup.

Pelicans guard Bryce Dejean-Jones shot and killed

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Pelicans guard Bryce Dejean-Jones shot and killed

By Kurt Helin, NBC Pro Basketball Talk

This is a sad and stunning development.

Bryce Dejean-Jones, the rookie guard of the New Orleans Pelicans, has died, the Dallas, Texas, County Coroner has confirmed to NBC Sports. Travis Hines of the Ames Tribune broke the news.

Dejean-Jones was just 23.

The coroner’s office would not give a cause of death, but Shams Charania of The Vertical at Yahoo Sports had the tragic detail.