Bailey healthy; will do anything to win championship

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Bailey healthy; will do anything to win championship

FORT MYERS, Fla. Andrew Bailey knows the comparisons and the questions are inevitable. Replacing the most prolific closer in Red Sox history is not an easy task.

Bailey, the 2009 American League Rookie of the Year, was acquired in a December trade from Oakland. He has 75 career saves in three seasons with the As, while Papelbon has 219. Bailey, the two-time All Star, just wants to be himself.

Yeah, thats it, Bailey said. Paps obviously himself. Ive met him a couple times, and hes a good dude. So, hes moved on. Were two totally different pitchers. My goal is to kind of have the media ask the guy who follows me those questions. How are you going to replace Bailey? Thats kind of my goal. So, if I stick with that, Im sure Ill be all right.

Papelbon said Saturday from Bright House Field, spring training home of the Phillies, whom he joined as a free agent in October, he believed Bailey would be successful with the Sox.

Hes one of the best in the game, so its an honor coming from him, something like that, Bailey said. Hes done it here for a while. He knows what it takes, and If he believes in it. I know I can do it, Im looking to have the Fenway Park crowd on my side running out of those gates instead of rooting against me. So, coming out of the bullpen is always an adrenaline rush and Im looking forward to doing it in that uniform.

Bailey, who turns 28 in May, enters spring training fully healthy for the first time in his big league career. He did not make his first appearance until May 29 last season, sidelined by a strained right forearm.

Health is good, he said. Finished strong last year. Obviously, had a little battle, had to miss two months in the beginning of last year. But thats behind me and this is honestly the first healthy offseason Ive had in the big leagues. So looking forward to that and was able to start throwing a little earlier and not having to rehab anything until the middle of December.

Bailey grew up in New Jersey, went to Wagner College on Staten Island, and now lives in Connecticut. He knows as well as anyone the expectations put on a Red Sox pitcher.

Im a closer at heart, but Ill do anything to help the team win, he said. I said that in Oakland, whatever it takes. You look at my games, one, two innings, one plus, whatever the team needs.

I have that mentality of being aggressive. I live and die by strike one. Its the best pitch in baseball. I just kind of go out there, throw the ball as hard as I can. Theres nothing fancy about what I do. So thats kind my mentality. I think that fits the closers role pretty good.

Many of his college buddies are now former Yankees fans, Bailey said, jumping on the Sox bandwagon with him. One of the most common questions hes heard since joining the team: What will his entrance music be?

No idea, he said. I dont know how that works here. Supposedly they chose it for Pap. So I dont know whats going to go on. But, for me, I like to feed off the crowd, the adrenaline. So, if I get to choose, itll probably be something rock. Maybe Ill throw a little Boston twist in there with Aerosmith or something. But, well see. Maybe Godsmack.

Bailey admits theres one comparison to Papelbon he doesnt mind. Asked if he would dance in his boxer shorts on the Fenway lawn if the Sox won another World Series, Bailey replied:

Ill do anything to win the World Series. So you guys can keep me to that, too. Whatever you guys need me to do to win a World Series, Ill do it.

Bruins admit they 'just weren't ready' to play Isles in shutout loss

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Bruins admit they 'just weren't ready' to play Isles in shutout loss

BOSTON – The Bruins are starting to run out of adjectives and descriptors for these “no-show” performances on home ice.

The Bruins made it twice in two months that they’ve dropped a disappointing dud to one of the Eastern Conference’s worst teams when they came out flat, and never showed any signs of life in a 4-0 loss to the New York Islanders. The lack of effort and pitiful results were particularly disappointing coming off a solid five game stretch where they’d engineered high effort wins over Florida, St. Louis and Philadelphia.

Patrice Bergeron finished a minus-3 on the afternoon, and said in quasi-disgust that he knew five minutes into the game that his team didn’t have “it” on Monday.

“Something that we talked [headed into Monday was] about building from the last few weeks, and how good it felt around the room, I guess, with winning games basically,” said Bergeron. “[The shutout loss] just shows that you have to show up every night and not take things for granted. I think we did [take things for granted] this afternoon.

“It was about finding someone to get us a shift to get us going basically. We had a few good shifts there, and we sustained a little bit of pressure there. But then we just couldn’t keep that for the next lines after going, we couldn’t sustain that or build from that. It was really the whole team throughout the lineup that didn’t show up and, you know, it’s obviously inexcusable, unacceptable.”

Claude Julien mentioned the compacted schedule and potential fatigue playing into the Bruins looking “flat” on Monday against the Islanders, and perhaps that is partially to blame for an uncharacteristically lifeless performance from the Black and Gold. But the B’s essentially did nothing for 60 minutes after not having played for 48 hours dating back to a Saturday afternoon matinee win over the Flyers, so the fatigue excuse is difficult to swallow.

Instead it looked like a Bruins team that thought they were going to roll out the pucks and beat the worst team in the Metro Division that had lost four-of-five games. Instead a defensive zone breakdown led to a Nikolay Kulemin goal midway through the second period, and the Bruins collapsed after that. Josh Bailey tucked a short side goal past a late-reacting Tuukka Rask for a soft serve special allowed by Boston’s ace goaltender, and Kulemin scored again in the second period once the Bruins began cheating at the offensive end of the ice.

To make matters worse, the Bruins showed zero fight or willingness to scratch and claw their way back into the game in the third period. Instead it looked like they quit on two points that could end up being extremely important at the end of the season.

It also looked like the Bruins weren’t ready to play, and that they overlooked the downtrodden Islanders for the second time in as many months.

“Maybe we took them a little lightly, but we just weren’t ready [to play],” said Brad Marchand. “We have to look ourselves in the mirror and all be a little bit better. We all have to be prepared for every game. You can’t look at the guy besides us and think he’s going to do the job. We have to take a little onus on ourselves and all be a little bit better. As a team, again, we have to play the system together and we have to back each other up. We have to play as one unit and we didn’t do that.”

It’s long past the point where the words even matter that the Bruins are uttering after games like Monday afternoon. Instead it’s about results and nothing else, and the B’s were nothing short of putrid in that category against the Islanders with points at a premium this time of year.