Bag Guy Chronicles

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Bag Guy Chronicles

Remember Fenway Bag Guy?

Of course you do. You'd forget your own mother before you forgot the man who once heroically placed an enormous bag over his head and sat behind home plate for two innings of an early-season game against the Indians.

At the time, we all believed that his emergence was the sign of something special. Or more, that it just gave us an excuse to have fun at Fenway again. But in retrospect

It actually was the sign of something special.

The Sox are now 10-3 since Bag Guy arrived on the scene that's not counting the game at which he first appeared. Even more, they're a perfect 5-0 at Fenway.

It's funny, because when I originally wrote about the Bag Guy phenomenon, I feared the arrival of annoying imitators. Bands of dudes who would converge on Yawkey Way with bags on their heads, thinking they were as funny as the original, but who were really just making a bad situation worse. However, the more I think about it, the more I think it might be fun to see the bag parade pick up.

The first rule of being a Bag Guy would be that you still have to act like a normal fan. You have to root for the Sox, hate on the opposition. Essentially, act the same way you would at a typical game.

Only you have a bag on your head.

Why bother?

Because do you know who's hurt the most by that brown paper bag? (Besides your wifegirlfriend, who's mortified in the seat next to you). That's right: The owners. John, Tom and Larry. And at the end of the day, they're still the guys who need to be delivered a message.

We can yell and scream all we want about the mentality of the players and the craziness of the manager, but nothing's going to really change over there until Henry sells the team and Lucchino's shown the door. And there's no better way to let them know that we want them out, than with the aesthetic desecration of their beloved Fenway Park.

Sure, there's a chance they just ignore it and go about their miserable business, but worst case scenario: Everyone's having fun. Everyone's coming together to rally around a common cause idiot owners. And the best part of all? It's good luck. The Sox can't lose.

All because of Fenway Bag Guy.

The legend lives on.

Rich can be reached at rlevine@comcastsportsnet.com. Follow Rich on Twitter at http:twitter.comrich_levine

Former Red Sox prospect Andy Marte killed in car crash in Dominican Republic

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Former Red Sox prospect Andy Marte killed in car crash in Dominican Republic

Former major leaguer Andy Marte, a one-time top prospect in the Red Sox organization, was killed in a car crash in the Dominican Republic on Sunday. He was 33.

Marte was killed the same day that Royals pitcher Yordano Ventura died in a separate car crash in the Dominican. Ventura was 25. Coincidentally, Ventura was the Royals starting pitcher in Marte's final major league game, for the Arizona Diamondbacks on Aug. 6, 2014.

Marte, drafted by the Braves in 2000, was ranked the No. 9 prospect in baseball in 2005 when the third baseman was traded to the Red Sox as part of the deal that sent shortstop Edgar Renteria to Atlanta and Marte became the top-ranked prospect in the Red Sox organization.  

Marte was traded by the Red Sox to the Indians in 2006 in the deal that sent Coco Crisp to Boston and spent five seasons with Cleveland. His best season was 2009 (.232, six home runs, 25 RBI in 47 games). After a six-game stint with Arizona in 2014, he played in South Korea the past two years.  

Metropolitan traffic authorities in the Dominican told the Associated Press that Marte died when a car he was driving his a house along the highway between San Francisco de Macoris and Pimentel, about 95 miles (150 kilometers) north of the capital.
 

Royals pitcher Yordano Ventura killed in car crash in Dominican Republic

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Royals pitcher Yordano Ventura killed in car crash in Dominican Republic

Kansas City Royals pitcher Yordano Ventura was killed in a car crash in in the Dominican Republic on Sunday morning, according to multiple reports. Ventura was 25 years old.

Highway patrol spokesman Jacobo Mateo told the Associated Press that Ventura died on a highway leading to the town of Juan Adrian, about 40 miles (70 kilometers) northwest of Santo Domingo. He says it's not clear if Ventura was driving.

Ventura was killed the same day former major leaguer Andy Marte died in a separate car crash in the Dominican. Coincidentally, Ventura was the starting pitcher in Marte's final MLB game, for the Arizona Diamondbacks on Aug. 6, 2014. 

Ventura was 13-8 with a 4.08 ERA for the Royals' 2015 World Series champions and 11-12 with a 4.45 ERA in 32 starts in 2016. The right-hander made his major league debut in 2013 and in 2014 went 14-10 with a 3.20 ERA for Kansas City's A.L. pennant winners. 

Ironically, Ventura paid tribute to his good friend and fellow Dominican, Oscar Tavares, who was also killed in a car crash in the D.R. in October 2014, by wearing Tavares' initials and R.I.P. on his cap before Ventura's start in Game 6 of the World Series in 2014. 

Ventura is the second current major league player to die in the past five months. Former Miami Marlins ace Jose Fernandez was killed in a boating accident in Miami on Sept. 25.