Ray of Insanity

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Ray of Insanity

There are only four days left until the Super Bowl, which means we only have about 100 hours to absorb, evade, laugh at andor tear our hair out at whatever the hell is going on with Ray Lewis right now.

As you can tell, I've been all over the place on exactly how to feel about Ray. First, you obviously have to respect him as a player. Ray Lewis is a guy you'll tell your children and grandchildren about. For better or worse and every which way, he's a legend.

There's also the fact that he knocked out the Pats, and took great joy in so doing, which takes away some of the luster. There's also the fact that he's pretty much full of crap. That he preaches certain things on the surface -- and does so to a truly outrageous extent -- yet has repeatedly acted in ways that contradict that in personal life.

Not coincidentally, he's also out of his mind, which is something that we've always known about Lewis but is especially true during this last run to the Super Bowl. The man's taken crazy to a whole new level, most recently by showing up to recent press conference with a hairline that had been recently and so-very-obviously been drawn on with what looks to be paint or an industrial strength Sharpie. And then, in my favorite development of the week, Sports Illustrated reported that Lewis may have been acted outside the NFL law in his recovery from torn right triceps. That reportedly led to an interesting conversation between Lewis and one of the representative for a company called Sports With Alternatives To Steroids in which Lewis was:

"Prescribed a deluxe program, including holographic stickers on the right elbow; copious quantities of the powder additive; sleeping in front of a beam-ray light programmed with frequencies for tissue regeneration and pain relief; drinking negatively charged water; a 10-per-day regimen of the deer-antler pills that will "rebuild your brain via your small intestines" (and which Lewis said he hadn't been taking, then swallowed four during the conversation); and spritzes of deer-antler velvet extract (the Ultimate Spray) every two hours."

You know, the deer spray has gotten most of the attention from this story, but I can't get enough of the holographic stickers. I just imagine him busting through the doors at his local CVS and screaming: "Where the STICKERS?!" "No, no. That won't do. I need HOLOGRAMS!"

So yeah, there's the fact that it certainly seems like he cheated to get back on the field. It was highly likely that something was up when Lewis came back so quickly from his injury, when he became the first player to ever suffer torn triceps and make it back to play that same season. And this SI report put it over the top. I mean would anyone be surprised if the Ravens win the Super Bowl, Lewis wins the MVP and then three weeks it's revealedproven once in for all that he took illegal substances? Nah.

So, in the end, I think there's only one thing to do.

Root for the 49ers.

Rich can be reached at rlevine@comcastsportsnet.com. Follow Rich on Twitter at http:twitter.comrich_levine

Report: 3 owners unhappy with Kraft's amicus brief on behalf of Brady

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Report: 3 owners unhappy with Kraft's amicus brief on behalf of Brady

Three NFL owners have expressed “extreme disappointment” in Robert Kraft and the Patriots filing an amicus brief on behalf of Tom Brady in the quarterback’s appeal of the Second Circuit Court’s reinstatement of his Deflategate suspension, according to Jason Cole of Bleacher Report. 

The Patriots filed the brief on Wednesday. 

The owners see the move as a publicity stunt done to appease Brady and the Patriots fans, Cole said, and they don’t believe Kraft did it any seriousness because the issue speaks to NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell’s ability to punish players and undermines the league’s collective bargaining agreement with the players.

If Kraft thought it mattered, he wouldn't have done it, Cole said one owner told him. 
 

Collins, Hightower mum on contract talks

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Collins, Hightower mum on contract talks

FOXBORO – A fleet of Patriots have expiring contracts after this season but Dont'a Hightower and Jamie Collins are the two most prominent on that list.

With the sport being the way it is – a nearly 100-percent casualty rate every season – it’s never comfortable for a player to enter a contract year without knowing his long-term future. And it’s especially uncomfortable for players whose first contracts are expiring because the second NFL contract is usually the bonanza.

Both Hightower and Collins can entertain thoughts of contracts worth more than $50M if good fortune sticks with them.

The question as it pertains to both of these players is whether they get contract extensions this summer or whether they go into the year with contract pressure bearing down and ultimately become free agents.

Neither player was very forthcoming after their OTA practice Thursday.

With Collins, that’s often the case. He’s never been expansive with media. It was very uncharacteristic for Hightower to be so clipped in his answers, though.

Every question posed to Hightower was met with a variation of, “I’m just trying to get better.”

Asked about his contract, Hightower replied, “I ain’t got nothing to do with none of that. I’m just out here trying to get better with my teammates.”

When it was pointed out that Hightower does indeed have say on his contract, he answered, “That might be. But there’s a time and place for everything and I’m just out here trying to get better.

“If I get better I feel like that’ll take care of everything else,” he added. “If I get better each and every day that’s all I can ask for.”

Asked whether he’s at all focused on his deal, Collins replied, “No, I come out here and I handle my business and I let the rest speak for itself … My first priority is me. So I’m gonna handle me."