Patriots prepare for Ravens' physical play

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Patriots prepare for Ravens' physical play

FOXBORO -- Recent history would suggest that the Patriots are going to put up points on Sunday, and that the team's biggest task is stopping Baltimore's offense from getting in the end zone.

But in order for New England's offense to have success in the AFC Championship, quarterback Tom Brady will need his offensive line to be at its best against a Ravens defense that finished the regular season with the third-most sacks.

"This will be the most physical front we face all year, by far," said Patriots veteran offensive lineman Brian Waters on Thursday. "That's something that, if you watch them, it doesn't take long to figure out that that's what they thrive upon, being physical and really trying to overwhelm you on defense, getting to the ball, going after the football. The way they hit, the way they attack the quarterback, the way they shed blockers, that's definitely an emphasis on their football team.

"It's always our number one job up front," added Waters. "We obviously know that, if we keep him clean, then we have a better chance of winning, by far. So it's going to be a great task for us, but it's the largest emphasis of our job, as offensive linemen."

Logan Mankins agreed, and pointed out that the Ravens pass-rush doesn't just have one or two dangerous players. It's their whole system that allows them to have such a ferocious attack on opposing quarterbacks.

"They're very physical," he said. "They have numerous guys that are at least 350 pounds. They've got some big guys. And that all starts with Ray Lewis. He's played physical for his entire career. Those guys feed off this, and I think that he demands that they play physical also. They're a physical football team, offensively and defensively.

"They have numerous guys across the board that can rush the passer, and they've all got numerous sacks. So, it's not just one guy doing it," added Mankins. "They have a lot of guys that are good at it. And I think collectively, they know how to rush the passer. That's why they're so good."

Wednesday, Jan. 18: Landeskog wants to stay in Colorado

Wednesday, Jan. 18: Landeskog wants to stay in Colorado

Here are all the links from around the hockey world, and what I’m reading while thoroughly enjoying Nick Offerman co-hosting on the Today Show this morning.

*Gabriel Landeskog knows his name has been mentioned in trade rumors with teams like the Bruins, but he wants to stay with the Colorado Avalanche.

*The New York Rangers are facing a goalie crisis for the first time in 11 years as Henrik Lundqvist is beginning to show signs of hockey mortality.

*PHT writer James O’Brien has the New York Islanders seeking to speak with fired Florida coach Gerard Gallant about their new opening after firing Jack Capuano.

*Ondrej Pavelec has been brought back from the AHL to Winnipeg to rescue the Jets from their goaltending situation, and he wants to stay for as long as he can.

*Rene Bourque has reached the 700 game mark in his NHL career with the Colorado Avalanche, and he hopes to keep it going.

*Young star Jack Eichel’s hunger for greatness could certainly lend itself to a leadership role with the Buffalo Sabres

*For something completely different: Hollywood is thinking of rebooting “White Men Can’t Jump” and this is simply the worst idea ever. I’d rather watch a movie with Woody and Snipes 25 years later than a lame reboot.

 


 

Mike Gorman: 'No thanks on Carmelo Anthony to the Celtics'

Mike Gorman: 'No thanks on Carmelo Anthony to the Celtics'

The New York Knicks arrive in Boston tonight with the accompanying "Melo-drama" of Carmelo Anthony's disintegrating relationship with team president Phil Jackson.

Anthony would have to waive his no-trade clause to leave New York and Boston has been an oft-rumored destination. 

On "The Toucher and Rich Show", the longtime voice of the Celtics, Mike Gorman, said he hopes it doesn't happen. 

"I don't get it. I don't see it," Gorman said. "He's a ball stopper. One of the things that always intrigued me about Carmelo is when he's played with Team USA or an Olympic team, often he's the best player. Then you go and see him in a regular-season game and you say, 'Oh no, no."'