Many NFL scouts on hand for BC Pro Day


Many NFL scouts on hand for BC Pro Day

BOSTON, MA -- Wednesday was a beautiful afternoon for Pro Day at Boston College. Too bad the event was held inside a bubble at Alumni Field. But considering how much the players can't control when it comes to the 2012 NFL Draft, they probably appreciated not having to worry about sun and wind.

32 players from nine different teams worked out from 11 AM - 2 PM, running the 40-yard dash, completing a three-cone drill, and performing positional drills. BC Eagles were joined by players from UMass, Harvard, Holy Cross, Merrimack, Endicott, Salve Regina, Delaware, and Dartmouth.

Confused by those last few? NFL rules state that, for BC's Pro Day, non-member invitees can either go to school in Massachusetts or hold residence in the state. They just needed recommendation by an NFL scout or coach.

And there were plenty of those.

BC officials noted 34 scouts from 27 pro teams on hand. Representing the Patriots were offensive line coach Dante Scarnecchia, assistant director of college scouting Brian Smith, and Mick Lombardi. Scarnecchia grabbed the reigns for the linemen drills. It's worth noting he took an extra second to shake hands and speak with former Eagle O-liner Mark Spinney before barking orders to the rest.

Here's the complete list of attendees:

Boston College: LB Luke Kuechly, TE Lars Anderson, DB Donnie Fletcher, DE Max Holloway, WR Ifeanyi Momah, P Ryan Quigley, COL Mark Spinney, FBLB Dan Williams

UMass: WR Tom Gilson, TB Jon Hernandez, LB Tyler HOlmes, TETBHB Emil Igwenagu, OL John Samuda, WR Julian Talley, LS Travis Tripucka, OLBS Shane Viveiros

Dartmouth: RB Nick Schweiger

Delaware: OL Shea Allard

Endicott: TELS Taylor Allen, DE Kevin Eagan

Harvard: LB Alex Gedeon, OL Kevin Murphy, DELB Josue Ortiz-Santana, QB Collier Winters

Holy Cross: DB Chandler Fenner, OL Mike McCabe, LB Ricky Otis, QB Ryan Taggert

Merrimack: LBDL Tony Johnson, LB Shawn Loiseau, QB James Suozzo

Salve Regina: LT Andrew McNeice

Bruins need to "find a way to start playing with a lead"

Bruins need to "find a way to start playing with a lead"

BOSTON -- There’s only so long that a team can hope to thrive, or even survive, in the NHL if they’re constantly chasing the game on the scoreboard, and chasing the puck after digging themselves a hole. The Bruins have been that team in the first couple of weeks during the regular season, and made it five times in five games that they’ve given up the game’s first goal in an eventual 4-2 loss to the Montreal Canadiens at TD Garden.

It’s a pattern that is long past getting old to Bruins head coach Claude Julien, who can’t seem to play the front-runner this season despite three comebacks that have allowed for a 3-2-0 record overall this season.

“I hope it’s not a habit. It’s certainly not what we’re looking for, but there’s no doubt. I think it’s pretty obvious that with the amount of games we’ve played, five games, we haven’t scored first,” said Julien. “We talked about that this morning, trying to get that first goal, and it hasn’t happened yet.”

The start to the game wasn’t really the problem on Saturday night as it’s been a couple of times this season. Instead the Bruins enjoyed a handful of quality scoring chances in the opening 20 minutes against the Habs, but couldn’t come through and finish off those plays when it might have meant an early lead.

Instead it lead to what Julien termed a “terrible” second period that was flat, full of mistakes and ended with the B’s trailing Montreal by a couple of goals. The Bruins scratched and clawed their way to making it a one-goal game in the third period, but that was as close as the Black and Gold would get in losing their ninth straight home game to the arch-rival Canadiens.

“It’s kind of been a story about how things are going for us this far, we’ve got to find a way to start playing with a lead. If you don’t capitalize on your chances, you see what happens when you come out [flat] in the second period,” said Torey Krug, who finished a game-worst minus-3 in the loss for the Bruins. “We had another poor second period and you know it’s kind of… you got to make sure that we put our hand on that and it doesn’t become a thing for the team this year. You see that when you don’t capitalize on chances early, that’s what’s going to happen.”

It’s been a positive development that the Bruins have shown the willingness and backbone to fight back into games after early deficits, and they showed that quality once again on Saturday night by scoring a couple of goals in the third period to keep things close. But the Bruins would be best served if they can start lighting the lamp a little earlier in these games, and see how the other half lives by playing with a comfortable lead every once in a while.