Less talk, more action needed from Pats secondary

Less talk, more action needed from Pats secondary
October 15, 2012, 3:54 am
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SEATTLE -- The Patriots secondary has a mantra: "We need to make more plays."
At some point, they'll need to stop saying it and start doing it.
The Seahawks had 11 passing plays of 10 or more yards in their 24-23 win over New England Sunday. Quarterback Russell Wilson, a rookie, completed 16 of 27 passes, including three bombs that traveled 46, 50, and 51 yards. Two of those deep balls went for touchdowns.
After the game, that tired old refrain spun around and around.
"It's just that simple. That's the bottom line: We've got to make more plays to help this team win," said cornerback Devin McCourty.
"It's disappointing. We could have played better. Seattle did a great job, just kept fighting and trying to make plays. We've got to play better."
Nobody is arguing.
New England's secondary is the imperfect cog in an otherwise sleek machine. Sometimes, the cog works OK, like when McCourty grabbed two interceptions against Buffalo. Even then, as with Denver last week, the opposing quarterback was allowed more than 300 receiving yards and at least three touchdowns.
But the Patriots offense rolled on in both weeks because of its high-powered offense and defensive front seven. Two victories drowned out the groaning of that uncertain cog.
Until this weekend.
A hip injury has sidelined safety Steve Gregory since Week 4. When Patrick Chung sustained a shoulder injury in the fourth quarter and left the game, that left rookies Tavon Wilson and Nate Ebner to sure up the back end. That's when Seattle's quarterback and Sidney Rice pounced on New England with a 46-yard game-winner.
"I got beat -- plain and simple," said Wilson. "We were in simple coverage. Rice made a play and I didn't.
"I'm held accountable just like everybody else on this team. I don't expect them to take no slack on me because I'm a rookie. That's what my team put me out there for -- they expect me to make the play. And I should make the play."
There's always the threat of benching.
Starting cornerback Kyle Arrington was booted on the third series for rookie Alfonzo Dennard. A 24-yard touchdown surrendered by Arrington in the first quarter appeared to be a last straw of some kind.
But what do you do when the entire unit gives up 293 yards to the NFL's 31st-ranked passing offense? Bench them all?
"Gotta do better," said Arrington. "I don't have much to say. I can only speak for myself. Gotta do better. I will be better and we'll work our ass off this week and get ready for New York."
All they need to do is make more plays.