Janoris Jenkins worth the gamble?

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Janoris Jenkins worth the gamble?

When it comes to NFL talent, where is the appropriate balance between risk and reward?

Janoris Jenkins is amping up the buzz on this annual draft question.

When you hear that name do you think Northern Alabama standout? Probably not. You likely remember him as the Florida cornerback who got booted out of school for multiple marijuana arrests and a failed drug test.

A shame. Jenkins is a first-round caliber defensive back. He's explosive, he's got good technique and coordination.

But coaches had to probe into his past at the NFL Combine. Jenkins says he looked his firing squad in the eye.

"I was honest, straightforward, told 'em I did it. I admitted to everything, I take full responsibility, and I learned from it."

He talked about the failed test, the drug charges, and the bar fight. The Combine certainly wasn't the first time he'd thought about the past; those Thursday night Northern Alabama games provided a gauge for how far he had fallen.

"There was a couple times. We didn't really play on Saturdays. My Saturdays I watched Florida, watched some of my old teammates play. It struck me, it hit me as a kid. I was just like, 'Man, I'm supposed to be there with those guys.' Just thinking about my past."

How much will teams like the Patriots think about it? Teams that need talent. Period. The 23-year old's arrest record is unimpressive -- that in combination with four children under the age of three has his basic sense of responsibility under the microscope.

Do not underestimate the need for examination.

Brandon Meriweather should be entering his prime in New England. Think about that.

The former Patriots safety should be preparing for his sixth NFL season; he should be playing on a sweet four-year deal. But he was a knucklehead in college and a knucklehead in the NFL. New England gave up on Meriweather after four seasons. The Bears tried a one-year contract but, according to Lovie Smith at the NFL Combine, that "didn't work out" either.

Meriweather has talent -- enough that the Patriots spent their 24th pick of the 2007 draft on him -- but he never grew out of the immaturity and recklessness he displayed at the University of Miami.

Jenkins is another gamble.

He says he's grown up. The dismissal from Florida called for a life change; he believes he's committed to making it.

"Eliminate myself from some of those guys I used to hang with. I think about my mom all the time and my kids. In order for me to be successful and them to have a great life or a nice life I've got to put it behind me. In order for my kids to get what they want, I can be a father to my kids and just be there with my mom."

Getting a team to commit to him is the next step. Might it be the Patriots? Depends on how how lucky they feel.

Both Millers missing from Bruins practice, but trending toward return

Both Millers missing from Bruins practice, but trending toward return

BRIGHTON, Mass – While both Kevan Miller and Colin Miller were missing from Bruins practice on Saturday morning, both injured Bruins defensemen could be rejoining the team soon.

Colin Miller skated on his own prior to Saturday’s team practice at Warrior Ice Arena for the second or third time since suffering a lower body injury in the win over the St. Louis Blues. Claude Julien said his presence on the ice was proof that the puck-moving defenseman is “definitely on the mend”, and could be nearing a return to practice soon with Sunday marking the sixth straight game that he’ll have missed.

Kevan Miller is out with a concussion suffered last weekend in the win over the Philadelphia Flyers, and the B’s current three-game losing streak has coincided with his absence from the lineup.

Julien said Miller has actually been away from the team for the last couple of days while dealing with a virus, and that his recovery from the concussion symptoms was good prior to being knocked down by the illness.

“Kevan was actually feeling really well and then he got hit by a virus that’s kept him in bed for the last two days,” said Julien. “It’s nothing to do with his original injury. There was a possibility he could have been ready very soon, but that’s set him back a bit.”

Both are obviously out for Sunday’s matinee against the Penguins, but a return to practice at some point next week seems like a good bet for both players. Here are the line combos and defense pairings from Saturday’s practice with the Bruins focusing on getting a good result in Pittsburgh with the hockey club on a “mom’s trip” with 22 of the players’ mothers traveling with the team to and from the game:

Marchand-Bergeron-Vatrano

Schaller-Krejci-Pastrnak

Spooner-Nash-Backes/Hayes

Blidh/Beleskey-Moore-Czarnik

 

Chara-Carlo

Krug-McQuaid

Morrow-Liles

 

Rask

McIntyre

Fast-break points aren't necessarily a good thing for Celtics

Fast-break points aren't necessarily a good thing for Celtics

BOSTON – Conventional NBA wisdom tells you that getting out to score in transition is a good thing, usually serving as easy points scored, which is what every team wants, right?
 
But bundles of transition points have been nothing but trouble for the Celtics this season.
 
They are coming off a game against the New York Knicks in which they scored 22 fast-break points, which was their second-best showing this season. But the final score, a 117-106 loss, wasn’t all that unusual from what has happened this season when their transition game has generated a decent amount of scoring.
 
Boston has a 2-6 record this season when they score 16 or more fast-break points. On the nights when Boston’s fast-break offense generates 10 or fewer points?
 
They’re 11-5.
 
While there are several possible reasons why this is, here’s what you have to remember.
 
The Celtics are a ball-movement, 3-point shooting team.
 
Often that means they’ll pass up potential shots in transition, to instead work the ball around from one side of the floor to the other, until they get what they deem is the best shot to take (usually it’s a lightly contested to wide open 3-pointer).
 
The Celtics average 329.6 passes per game, which ranks second in the NBA (Philadelphia, 354.8). Not surprisingly, that has led to them ranking among the league’s leaders in assists (24.9, third in the NBA).
 
And that has led to Boston being ranked among the top-3 in several other key passing statistics, such as secondary assists (7.1, 2nd in the NBA); potential assists (49.5, 2nd); and assists points created (60.8, 3rd);
 
Here are a few more stats to crunch on, courtesy of CSN Associate Producer Andy Levine.
 
PAINT BY NUMBERS: When the Celtics score 40 percent or less of their points in the paint, they are 19-5 this season. When Boston gets 40 percent or more of its points in the paint, they are just 7-11.
 
BROWN IN THE FOURTH: Jaylen Brown has been among the better rookies this season, especially in the fourth quarter. Among rookies who played in at least 20 games in the fourth quarter, Brown is second in fourth quarter shooting at 54.9 percent. With those same standards, he’s sixth in shooting 3’s in the fourth at 38.5 percent.
 
CROWDER BOUNCES BACK: The past four games has seemingly brought out the best in Crowder. In that span, he has averaged 18.5 points and 6.8 rebounds while shooting 57 percent from the field and 48 percent from 3-point range. Crowder’s 3-point shooting of late has elevated him to seventh in the league while connecting on 42.5 percent of his 3-point attempts (minimum 150 attempts).

OUCH! It has not been a smooth start for Evan Turner with his new team, the Portland Trail Blazers. This season, Turner’s plus/minus is -234, which is the fourth-worst plus/minus in the NBA.