Fourth-quarter heroics part of Tebow's improvement

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Fourth-quarter heroics part of Tebow's improvement

FOXBORO -- When Bill Belichick went to Gainesville to work out Aaron Hernandez and Brandon Spikes before the 2010 NFL Draft, he also met with Tim Tebow, and worked him out as well.

While Belichick and Tebow learned different things about each other at that time, it's highly unlikely that Belichick could have ever predicted what Tebow's done for the Denver Broncos in the last couple of weeks. The magic that Tebow has possessed in the fourth quarter this season would be impossible to capture in a pre-draft workout.

"I've been in the league for 20-plus years, so you never want to say you've seen it all, but, you get to experience a lot, and he's a fine young man that's a young quarterback that keeps getting better every week," said Broncos coach John Fox on Wednesday.

"When you win in the National Football League, it becomes a pretty big deal on the outside."

Tebow is now 7-1 as a starter in the last eight weeks. And it's fair to say that he has become a pretty big deal.

He's winning because of his constant fourth-quarter heroics, which has been a stretch of dramatic and unprecedented finishes to games that previously saw three quarters of lackluster production.

So what makes him so much better in the fourth?

"I just think that I'm blessed to have great teammates and great coaches in those fourth quarters," said Tebow on Wednesday. "They make me look a lot better than I am, and I just thank the Lord that we've had the opportunity to pull a few of these ones out."

As Fox said on Wednesday, "The guy just wins."

"Knowing the young man, even before coming here to coach him, just in the draft process, he's got outstanding intangibles, and he performed at a very high level in college at the University of Florida," said Fox. "I think everybody can see that. And I think all young players in the National Football League have got a lot to learn. And quarterback is that much more difficult. I know it's the toughest job in our league. It might be one of the toughest jobs in sports.

"He's improving. It's not just the fourth quarter. He's improving as an NFL quarterback."

Braintree Municipal Golf helps out those with special needs

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Braintree Municipal Golf helps out those with special needs

The Braintree Municipal Golf Course helps people with special needs by giving them a chance to take some swings. Here's Kevin Walsh with the full report on a wonderful story.

Three things we learned from the Red Sox’ 10-9 loss to the Blue Jays

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Three things we learned from the Red Sox’ 10-9 loss to the Blue Jays

Three things we learned from the Boston Red Sox’ 10-9 loss to the Toronto Blue Jays…

1) Toronto’s offense can never be taken lightly.

Coming into the series, the Blue Jays had scored 197 runs, putting them in the middle of the pack among all Major League teams and averaging four runs per game. In the two games against Boston, they’ve scored 17 runs.

So an offense that had appeared to be dormant has been woken up thanks to some subpar Red Sox pitching.

It seems like these two teams are very similar and could be in opposite positions just as easily. The Blue Jays are only three behind in the win column (five in the loss), so Boston needs to win David Price’s Sunday start to widen the gap and cut their three-game skid.

2) Craig Kimbrel is only effective for so long.

Boston’s closer wasn’t giving excuses following Saturday’s game -- and this isn’t one either.

Saturday’s 39-pitch performance wasn’t just his season-high, but his career high in pitches.

This not only resulted in a drop in Kimbrel’s velocity, but it exposed flaws in the Red Sox’ pen. Kimbrel is truly a one-inning guy, so if Junichi Tazawa and Koji Uehara can’t get him the ball, he’s useless.

And it seems like Uehara won’t be used on back-to-back days frequently in the near future, so Boston won’t be able to use Tazawa in a seventh inning role with much consistency.

Somewhere along the way Dave Dombrowski will need to find another reliever for the back-end of the bullpen.

3) Offense can only take a team so far.

Both teams had big offensive days, in large part because pitchers from both sides made a lot of mistakes -- but they still took advantage of them.

Had the Red Sox been the home team in this contest, there’s no reason to believe they wouldn’t have won -- just based on the progression of the game and ignoring any statistical splits.

If the Red Sox are serious about making the postseason, they need pitching to pick up the slack once in a while. Because when they hit the road late in the year, games like will slip away when quality pitching is lacking.