Fanene's versatility important to Pats

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Fanene's versatility important to Pats

It was the second day of NFL free agency when Jonathan Fanene got the call.

Bill Belichick was on the other line. Exactly what was said, we dont know but it was all Fanene needed to hear to make New England his new home.

I had a chance to go and do some visits, but I didnt want to go, Fanene said. When I first got the call from Bill I was so excited I wanted to make a move and come out here.

The 6-foot-4, 292-pound 30-year old defensive end has played the last seven seasons in Cincinnati, after they drafted him in the seventh round of the 2005 NFL Draft. He saw increased playing time from 2005-2009, peaking at 16 games, 10 starts, 36 combined tackles, six sacks, and a 45-yard pick-six.

2010 a contract year looked to be the season hed make the jump, but an early-season hamstring injury landed him on injured reserve. That led to a one-year deal back with the Bengals on short money for the 2011 season.

Fanene made 24 tackles including 6.5 sacks in 16 games just two starts for Cincinnati in 2011, but that was enough to catch the eye of the Patriots.

I guess they watched film on me and I guess what they need to build up the pressure or pass rush up here, Fanene said. So I guess whatever they see in me they brought me up here to help the team.

As it stands, the Patriots are out 20 sacks between Mark Anderson, who signed with the Bills, and Andre Carter, still a free agent. Its clear the Patriots zoned in on making up for some of that with recent additions of Fanene, who is a balanced run and pass defender, and rookies Chandler Jones and Donta Hightower.

The rookies will get their wake-up call in no time, but for Fanene, its already happened. He noted that there were a lot of differences between Cincinnati and New England, but elected to pick out just one.

I see guys focused more. And not just a workout, but everything that we do out here is more like a team effort. And guys really welcome me inside the locker room. Its not about all the talking and all the media and TV stuff, but its more like hard working and just do your job.

Who better than Chad Ochocinco former teammate (and, shall we say, media showboat) of Fanenes in Cincinnati to express that message?

Yeah, I talked to him a little bit last week and he just tried to put me on the game, and let me know whats going on out here, Fanene said of Ochocinco. This is not Cincinnati, this is not a regular team this is like real business now. So Im trying to get on my two feet and work.

Belichick has always valued players who can do multiple things, and Fanene fits that mold. His versatility will be big for the Patriots next season, and hes got the right attitude about that gift.

If they tell me to play nose, Ill play nose. 3-technique, 6-technique, 7-technique, outside end, special teams, Im doing it, he said.

Theres a lot of good things out here. Theres a winning franchise first of all. Its a blessing to be here and be part of the Patriots. I told myself I just want to do the best I can do out here so we can win.

Curran’s 100 plays that shaped a dynasty: A nice pair of kicks

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Curran’s 100 plays that shaped a dynasty: A nice pair of kicks

We're into the Top 10 now.

These are the plays of the Bill Belichick Era you best never forget. And probably can't. They're the ones that led directly to championships -- most for New England, a couple for the other guys. Or they're plays that signified a sea change in the way the New England Patriots under Belichick would be behaving from there on out.

I did my best to stack them in order of importance. You got a problem with that? Good. Let us know what's too high, too low or just plain wrong. And thanks for keeping up!

PLAY NUMBER: 4

THE YEAR: 2001 (actually Feb. 3, 2002)

THE GAME: Patriots 20, Rams 17

THE PLAY: Vinatieri 48-yarder in Superdome delivers SB36 win

WHY IT’S HERE: When the Red Sox won the World Series in 2004, it was viewed nationally and locally as a cathartic moment for a long-suffering region. Deliverance for a fanbase that resolutely suffered through 90 years of star-crossed heartbreak with a mix of stoicism and fatalism. “Long-suffering Red Sox fan” was a badge of honor, an identity. And New Englanders – baseball fans or not - would self-identify with the hideous notion of Red Sox Nation. There was no “Patriots Nation.” To drag out the forced metaphor, Patriots fans were living in tents and cabins in the wilderness, recluses. Reluctant to be seen in town where they’d be mocked. And suddenly, they cobbled together one of the most improbable, magical seasons in American professional sports, a year which gave birth to a dynasty which was first celebrated, now reviled but always respected. And while so many games and plays led to this 48-yarder – ones we’ve mentioned 12 times on this list – Adam Vinatieri kicking a 48-yarder right down the f****** middle to win the Super Bowl was an orgasmic moment for the recluses and pariahs that had been Patriots fans when nobody would admit to such a thing.
 

PLAY NUMBER: 3

THE YEAR: 2001 (actually Jan. 19, 2002)

THE GAME: Patriots 16, Raiders 13

THE PLAY: Vinatieri from 45 through a blizzard to tie Snow Bowl

WHY IT’S HERE: Two thoughts traveling on parallel tracks were running through the mind while Adam Vinatieri trotted onto the field and lined up his 45-yarder to tie Oakland in the 2001 AFC Divisional Playoff Game, the final one at Foxboro Stadium. “There’s no way he can make this kick in this weather,” was the first. “The way this season’s gone, I bet he makes this kick. It can’t end here. It can’t end now.” From where I was sitting in the press box I couldn’t see the ball clearly, probably because I was looking for it on a higher trajectory than Vinatieri used. So I remember Vinatieri going through the ball, my being unable to locate it in the air and then looking for the refs under the goalposts to see their signal. And when I located them, I saw the ball scuttle past. Then I saw the officials’ arms rise. Twenty-five years earlier, the first team I ever followed passionately – the ’76 Patriots – left me in tears when they lost to the Raiders in the playoffs. Now, at 33, I was covering that team and it had gotten a measure of retribution for the 8-year-old me.