Cardinals win over Patriots does in fact make a statament


Cardinals win over Patriots does in fact make a statament

FOXBORO -- Ken Whisenhunt didn't necessarily put the league on notice, following the Arizona Cardinals' 20-18 win over the Patriots at Gillette Stadium on Sunday.

And he can deny all he wants that a statement was made in leaving New England with a win and a 2-0 record to begin the season.

But facts are facts. And sometimes, reality can get in the way of a politically-correct post game comment.

"Nah, we don't want to talk about statements," said Whisenhunt after the win. "It's two games, okay? You know, I'm proud of our guys and the way they work, and the way they play."

Well, the way the Cardinals worked, and played, on Sunday -- handing the Patriots their first ever loss in a home opener at Gillette Stadium -- a statement was made.

And even the coach who tried to downplay that statement, couldn't help but to remind the football world know that his Cardinals were a two-touchdown underdog, and that calling this win "huge" would be an "understatement."

"We've been a good red-zone team, and we executed our plan," said Whisenhunt. "We had a good plan coming in. Our players believed in it. We stayed patient, worked at it, and had a good week of practice. It's not easy coming in here against a very good football team and a good quarterback.

"Nobody really gave us a chance," he added. "But our guys believed they could do it. And it's great to see them operate that way."

The Cardinals won in dramatic fashion, with a Patriots missed field goal. The finish wasn't exactly how anyone wrote it up, but the end result is all that matters.

And afterwards, the Cardinals locker room reeked of a team that -- by coming into New England and getting a win -- believed their statement was strong.

"Defensive coordinator Ray Horton and coach Whisenhunt, they've been talking about it all week. Come here to get a 'W' and it can definitely propel our season to the next level," said Cardinals cornerback patrick Peterson. "Some guys in the locker room described it as a statement game. But we'll have to wait and see what the rest of the season has for us."

The meaning of this win had some looking further ahead than others.

"It was electric, bro. It was electric," said Cardinals linebacker Quentin Groves. "Just to get this win for us, man, it was electric. It's one of those wins, where you look back during a championship run, and say, 'That was the moment in our season where we knew we were a great team.'"

To say that Arizona was prepared for Sunday's game against the Patriots would also be an understatement. After the win, defensive coordinator Ray Horton told a story from this past NFL Draft, that had him drawing up plays for the Week 2 game, while the rest of the team made the picks.

"We were doing the draft, and I was sitting there doing New England plays," said Horton. "They couldn't see what I was doing, but that's the honest truth. I was doing New England plays that we ran in this game, during the draft. We're sitting there talking about draft players, and I'm sitting there doing that. That's a true story."

The Cardinals bought into that well thought-out game plan, and will leave New England as a 2-0 team.

"Coach Horton, he definitely had a pretty good game plan together," said Peterson. "He wanted to get after these guys. He wanted to keep pressure in Brady's face, so we can confuse him a little bit. And that's what we did.

"Coach Whisenhunt preached about it all week, take what these guys give us. They'll give us our shots sooner or later . . . We just kept grinding, man. It was all about grinding, playing a quarter at a time, and playing for each other."

"I think we've developed a never-say-die attitude," said Horton. "We won so many close games last year -- four overtime games. So we know how to react and play in tight games. It's just a lot of hard work that paid off."

Giardi's stopwatch: Brady quick vs. Steelers


Giardi's stopwatch: Brady quick vs. Steelers

How quick was Tom Brady's release in the New England Patriots win over the The Pittsburgh Steelers? Glad you asked. 

On average, Brady took 2.11 seconds to release the ball. That’s not as quick as he was against Cleveland, when averaged 1.86 seconds, but still pretty flippin' quick.

2.05 - Gun. Edelman crosser 9 yards
0.80 - WR screen to Edelman - 2 yards
5.34 - Gun. Flushed. 13 yards to White
2.04 - Gun. Edelman crosser. 6 yards
1.59 - Gun. Screen to White. 19 yards. TD
1.65 - Gun. Edelman at the hash. 9 yards
1.72 - Gun. Edelman crosser. 11 yards
3.17 - Gun. Hogan outside the numbers. 13 yards
2.25 - Play action. Incomplete short left to White
1.24 - Edelman right flat. 6 yards
2.37 - Gun. Deep in to Gronkowski. 13 yards
2.20 - play action. Happy feet, Incomplete to Bennett
2.90 - Gun. Bolden drop
1.53 - Gun. Incomplete to White at the numbers
1.79 — Gun. Edelman crosser. 7 yards
1.36 - Gun. Short right to Blount. 7 yards
1.66 - Gun. Edelman drop 
3rd Quarter
3.44 - Gun. Awful backhanded flip throw. Incomplete to White
2.25 - Gun. Crosser to Bennett. 5 yards
1.39 - Gun. Short right to Edelman. 3 yards
2.18 - Gun. Ground seam. 36 yards. TD
1.59 - Gun. Short middle to Edelman. 11 yards
1.33 - Gronkowski. short right. 7 yards
3.16 - Play action. 37 yards to Gronkowski
3.89 - Gun. Pressure. Incomplete deep left to Mitchell

Brady on NFL handling of Brown case: 'They claim to take tough stances'


Brady on NFL handling of Brown case: 'They claim to take tough stances'

Since more information came out last week about Giants kicker Josh Brown's history of abusing women, the prevailing feeling for many Patriots fans has been this: How can Brown be suspended one game for doing something so heinous when Tom Brady was suspended four games for allegedly removing air from footballs.

The acts can't be compared, obviously. But the league's attitude in its pursuit of the each situation has served as an indicator of the NFL's priorities for many. 

On WEEI's Kirk and Callahan Show on Monday, Brady was asked if, in light of recent events, he's been angered any further by how the league handled his situation versus how it handled Brown's.

"I think it's the league's issue," Brady said. "Obviously a lot of controversy with that. I'm trying to stay out of all that. I'll let them handle it. I think that's their responsibility. But I certainly don't condone any part of domestic violence. It's a terrible, terrible thing, but I think the league, they've got to handle those type of things."

But, co-host Kirk Minihane asked, has Brady been satisfied with how the league has handled Brown's case and others like it? Brady laughed.

"I'm just gonna stay in my lane, Kirk," he said. "It's up to them to decide whatever they want to do, and I'm just gonna stay out of any . . . my opinions. I certainly have opinions. I just don't really care to share them."

Why not, co-host Gerry Callahan asked?

"Why not? Gerry, why not?" Brady asked. "C'mon, man."

But what was there to tip-toe around? The consensus on Brown, and the league's handling of Brown's situation, has been relatively unanimous, Brady was reminded.

Brady then offered more.

"I grew up with three sisters and I was very fortunate to learn from a loving father and a loving mother how to treat and respect women," Brady said. "And I have a daughter of my own, and I have no . . . Domestic violence is a horrible issue. It's a tragedy when it happens. Any type of abuse or bullying of people who can't defend themselves or fight for themselves, I have no respect for that.

"The NFL, they claim to take tough stances, and this is their situation. This is their situation to deal with so I'll let them deal with it. Like I said, I'm very fortunate to grow up with sisters and a mother and I condone no part of that. That is absolutely something I would never be a part of or do. It's just a terrible tragedy."